Does this type of Delay pedal exist ?

Baminated

Senior Member
Messages
6,491
1 .Tap Tempo

2. Separate switch and additional mix knob for a mix boost

No matter where I place the delay, when going into the front of the amp, it is too much when I hit the OD or switch to the OD channel on the amp

When I turn the mix down to compensate, it is too low when going clean

I notice that this is less of a prob when going into the loop, but I have other amps w/no loop
 

Nork

Member
Messages
710
i'm not sure i understand, but the empress superdelay (is a lot of pedal) has a separate mix and volume knob.
 

frankfalbo

Member
Messages
278
If you have a delay with a wet loop, you can either put a boost pedal in there, or a volume pedal and rock the delay level up and down.
 

Baminated

Senior Member
Messages
6,491
If you have a delay with a wet loop, you can either put a boost pedal in there, or a volume pedal and rock the delay level up and down.
Hmmm not sure what you mean by a pedal having a wet loop. I have an echo park which has 2 ins/2 outs ?
 

frankfalbo

Member
Messages
278
Wet loop is an insert point for the delays only. It's like having a mixer channel just for the delays, so you can do whatever you want to them. You can put chorus on them, or phaser, distortion, EQ, whatever, but at hte very least you can put "volume" on them by having a boost pedal or volume pedal in the loop.
 

thedroid

Member
Messages
3,071
A lot of people set up two parallel signal paths -- one clean, one dirty -- and switch between them. You'll need a delay for each path. This costs more and takes up more space but is the easiest to use on stage: one stomp does everything. I've tried using a volume pedal for delay level on stage, and while it works great, it takes too much time and focus to adjust it on the fly. If you're a fairly stationary lead guitarist, I could see it working.
 

Grimace

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
677
He's having the "delay in front of a distortion" problem. Caused by the compression inherent in distortion. The difference between the original and the delayed sound is squashed, so that the repeats sound as loud as the original sound even though they are really not before they hit the distortion.

Best way to handle this is to put the delay after all distortion, which means in the effects loop of the amp. If you are getting a lot of power amp distortion, not much can help.

Or, you have a delay with two different presets with two different mixes and switch between the presets as you go from clean to dist. Might require some dancing.

Or you have two delays in two effects chains, one dedicated to the clean and the other dedicated to the distorted, and a switching system, like a loop pedal, that switches between the dedicated clean and dirty chains. Essentially what thedroid says.
 

Baminated

Senior Member
Messages
6,491
A lot of people set up two parallel signal paths -- one clean, one dirty -- and switch between them. You'll need a delay for each path. This costs more and takes up more space but is the easiest to use on stage: one stomp does everything.
Can i do this w/an A/B box ?
 






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