Does your dog like to be hugged? New study says they probably don't.

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by Stratonator, Apr 30, 2016.

  1. Stratonator

    Stratonator Member

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  2. Headshok

    Headshok Member

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    I have a dog that was abused and she loves being hugged. Any interaction with me is the greatest thing in the world to her. She may be an exception though because of the abuse she suffered.
     
  3. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    My Daisy doesn't like to be hugged lately because she figures, we're about to pull another tick off of her.

    This Trifexis used to work so well. Maybe we will throw this batch away and get a new batch.

    Only bad thing about West Tennessee besides tornadoes. Can't get over all these ticks. Could this be the fault of the large numbers of geese we have in the lakes and grounds right where the apartment is? I thought geese ate ticks like candy.
     
  4. Ampedusa

    Ampedusa Member

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    My dog demands to be held and hugged. It crawls into your arms and wants to be held.
     
  5. sausagefingers

    sausagefingers Supporting Member

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    When you hug your dog, you do it because it makes YOU feel good.:D
     
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  6. Probos

    Probos Supporting Member

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    I read that article the other day. I agree with the overall premise of what the piece says. A good majority of dogs don't necessarily like to be "hugged" or held,...especially if it's a firm or tight hug for more then just a few seconds. A lot of probably feel like they're being restrained which causes stress, but there are a lot of factors that go into whether or not some dogs like, don't like, or tolerate it that the article doesn't go into. I don't think the pics they provide necessarily illustrate their point very well either.

    We have a 5 yo Pembroke Welsh Corgi -- he's happy and fully of energy but is a bit of a nervous little guy and gets really bad separation anxiety. He always wants to be petted and loves to cuddle on the couch and in bed but he doesn't necessarily like being hugged or picked up and hugged. He stiffens up and does turn his head away like the article says dogs do. I've been around other dogs that love to be hugged and held,..so,...while the article might be right about the majority of dogs it's not an absolute 100% lock.
     
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  7. lefort_1

    lefort_1 Nuzzled Firmly Betwixt Gold Supporting Member

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    Our male blue heeler (RIP Farfel) used to hug by pressing the top of his head hard into your leg.
    dem Aussie's be bulldozers when they love.
     
  8. Stratonator

    Stratonator Member

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    It didn't sound like it proclaimed to be correct across the board but rather that there are some factors a lot of people might be unfamiliar with that would show that the dog doesn't actually enjoy hugs. They even mentioned the statistic 82% which still leads 18% of dogs who either are indifferent or enjoy it.

    My dog loves it but I can't recall the specific body language of the others I've had before.

    It kind of makes sense. Lots of cats don't like to be hugged but they don't instinctively try to earn your approval. I'd suspect a dog would just tolerate it so as to not go against his master's wishes.
     
  9. nondeplume

    nondeplume Puppet For Prophet Gold Supporting Member

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    I read this the other day....I don't know. The study, consisted of culling, in her words "I decided to look at a random sample of 250 such pictures." ...from the internet. Seemingly no basis in context, who, what, where and when the dog is being hugged (are pictures, randomly pulled from the internet the basis for a scientific study?).

    I can look stunningly unhappy, even ridiculous if the picture is taken at the wrong moment, and that's what these are, random slices on unknown situational moments. And I would think most people taking the picture would be focused on the reaction of the person, not the dog when they click.

    Like, I pulled 250 random videos of a Marshall plexi off of youtube and decided....Marshall sounds bad/good/great etc...that's hardly factual, or....scientific, right?

    Maybe I'm wrong...idk. My dogs don't exhibit this behavior with me, anymore than showing me their belly or burying their heads in my arms of their own volition etc...with unknown people to them, sure, they won't do that. And kids, they're a random nuclear bomb waiting to happen with animals, you never know how either will react. Puppies, they're still figuring it all out, but it's been awhile since most dogs were in the wild, operating under the fight/flight instinct, I still sorta have mine, especially around cameras. I can tell you right now, I have one dog that DOES NOT like having her picture taken, I don't know how she knows or better, what she thinks is going on, but she doesn't like it, maybe that's all that going on here, camera-shy.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2016
  10. Stratonator

    Stratonator Member

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    Mine initiates hugs when I'm seated by placing his head right below the crotch and pressing. Kind of like a headbutt minus the running start. Wags his tail and wants to be cuddled when he's in the mood.

    But mine shows the signs mentioned in the OP even without the hugs. He's just a submissive dog who's had an unpleasant past so he is uneasy about the most common thing. For instance, we have to tell him to drink or else he doesn't. Love carpeted floors but really dislikes walking on wooden ones. I could go on, but he's a real sweetheart who won the lottery by getting us as owners. We also did by getting him as our dog.

    Case in point. My wife sent me a funny pic she took when she was home alone with him saying he started drinking to cope with me leaving for a few hours.

    [​IMG]

    Head turned, ears low, whites of the eyes showing... These are the signs they're talking about but really, he was merely uncomfortable because he was on a wooden floor, told to sit and stay when he prefers to instead move around, and because he much prefers the downstairs area.

    Knowing your dog's temperment and idiosyncrasies is key to interpreting the signs correctly. If we had somebody hugging him in the pic and that website were to analyze it, they might come to the wrong conclusion about him disliking being hugged when it's not the reason he's displaying those signs to begin with.
     
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  11. Blix

    Blix Supporting Member

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    He looks uncomfortable because you brought a Cabernet Sauvignon, when he wanted a Merlot.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2016
  12. Steve Hotra

    Steve Hotra Silver Supporting Member

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    I think it depends on the dog and the owner / hugger.
    Our current dog Lucy, ( austrailian shepherd / bulldog mix) lives for hugs and petting.
    But she can be skittish at times, too.
    We think she was caged all day, before we adopted her.
     
  13. T Dizz

    T Dizz Member

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    same here. and when we stop hugging him, he paws at you to continue. He certainly does not show the signs in the OP.. he eats it up.
     
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  14. Dave Shoop

    Dave Shoop Member

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    My dog insists on being called Dr Ziggy. I refuse.
     
  15. derekd

    derekd Supporting Member

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    Mine definitely does not.

    She tolerates strangers petting her, but doesn't invite it. She will roll on the floor with me and will lay still if I rub her tummy, but she absolutely doesn't like the confinement of a hug.
     
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  16. Probos

    Probos Supporting Member

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    True, they didn't claim it was "across the board" in the article but the 82% is based off of photo examination. There's obviously some validity to that but that's only one way of determining if the hug is like or not,..and even that way is can be slightly flawed.

    Like I said, I agree with the article for the most part -- but a lot of factors can go into a dog liking or not liking "the hug".
     
  17. Stratonator

    Stratonator Member

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    Yeah. Read the post above where I embedded a picture of my dog for some more detail.

    Bottom line is the dog's upbringing factors in quite a bit. Some dogs have rather eccentric behavioral traits stemming from their abuse or neglect, assuming they were rescued. While others might have been raised with plenty of hugs growing up and they actually are either indifferent or happy to get that type of attention. And all kinds of exceptions in between, too.

    There have been similar studies in the past although I can't remember for the life of me the methodology that was used for those. They all suggested hugging as being a form of affection dogs don't typically enjoy or care for. Again, it makes sense for the most part. However, I'd say it's best left to the masters to observe their dog and judge for themselves if it's enjoyed or not.

    If anything, I like how it gives owners the info that perhaps it's best not to let their kids hug the dog, especially if there are strong signs he's not onboard with the idea.
     
  18. lefort_1

    lefort_1 Nuzzled Firmly Betwixt Gold Supporting Member

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    I'm not sure that rolled back ears are always a sign of subservience.

    Our heelers have always done that, and they've had a very easy/no-stress life.
    "Ears rolled back in love" is how we always seen/worded it.
    Our female heeler will hop up on the couch, push me flat on my back, lay on me, forepaws across my shoulders, ears rolled back in love, and lick my face until I can't breathe.
    ...not sure if that's a sign of subservience or not...
     
  19. FFTT

    FFTT Member

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    My little Mini would sit in my lap or yours 24/7 if it were allowed.

    She LOVES being babied and pampered.

    Like baths, fine with the hair dryer on high.
     
  20. lostpoet2

    lostpoet2 Supporting Member

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    My GSD loves hugs from my wife and I, but begrudgingly accepts "strangle hugs" from our two year old daughter. They are tight buddies though.
     

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