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Don't Laugh: My Sharona.....

hawkeye17

Member
Messages
1,064
You know for years the only version I've heard of this song was the radio version which hacks out most of the amazing guitar solo. I'm not sure who the guitarist was on this track but man that guy could rip. THAT is a great guitar solo...flat out. Who played the lead for the Knack back then?

 

PUCKBOY99

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,975
Berton Averre

More importantly. who's "Ms. Meatballs" in the pic ? :D

I always dug this one:

 

rob2001

Member
Messages
16,939
That band was quite the punching bag when I was a kid but when I hear that stuff now as an adult they wrote some mighty fine pop/rock songs. Good girls don't is an excellent tune. I don't know who they are but ya, great playing and writing (in a pop rock way)
 

the fat one

Senior Member
Messages
1,501
one of my favorite songs and the guitar lead is perfect

when it comes on the radio in Seattle nowadays they *still* play the radio edit with most of the solo gone...which just illustrates how completely ****ing LAME Seattle is. Seattle should just put on a little dress already.

The Lame List, indeed. This tops it.

 

Catoogie

Senior Member
Messages
3,969
I had to learn the solo for a benefit show for my friend's sister who was sick with cancer. My friend is now a Grammy winning recording engineer and his old band (they were signed to A&M back in the day )got back together to do a reunion. My buddy also wanted to do a set of covers with some of his close friends and since I used to be known as the guy who knew all the solos to Pop songs note for note, he called and asked me to play. The only thing is, I never knew this solo. I tried to tell him but he didn't believe me. 'Dude, I remember you playing this for me years ago.'. 'Nah man I know all the Elliott Easton stuff and it seems like a solo I would know but honestly, I don't know it.' We went back and forth a few times and then I just shut up and said "Ok brother, let me go over it again."

Now I HAD to know it note for note so I set out to learn it. Man, it wasn't like back in the old days when I had nothing but time along with loads of fire and a never-ending supply of attention to detail. So, I learned the chord changes of the song first. Then went to all of the little twists of the riff. Ya know, when they accent certain parts, when the push certain parts etc... After which I focused on Berton's parts, his chord inversions and ultimately, the solo. I slowed it down with Audacity and took each section and perfected it. It took me a week of my busy schedule but I got it. Note for note.

The night of the benefit was a lot of fun. Lots of old friends getting together for the love of one our own. GREAT musicians. Lots of fun. 'My Sharona' was the last song of the night. The band for the tune was stellar and it felt AMAZING to have that tight, powerful backing pushing me as I launched into the extended solo. You never really hear this song performed live, let alone played correctly but the support of veteran players, I felt like I was sitting on a rocket ship blasting off. My pull-offs weren't as clean as they when I was learning them in my studio but I chalk that up to some good old adrenalin. The roar of the audience when we ended the song was awesome and even better was when a friend of mine who is celebrated player came up to me and said 'Beautiful man. ****ing NOTE FOR NOTE. AWESOME.'. I didn't write the solo but I sure presented it as best I could and having a chance to play it onstage with old friends who happen to be some of the strongest musicians going, in front of old friends and acquaintances, it was the stuff of teenage dreams.

Go for it. Learn the song. NOTE FOR NOTE. There are tons of extremely small details you need to cop to truly pull it off but DAMN if it isn't an old fashioned boost when you finally get it RIGHT.
 

supergenius365

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
10,518
That solo is amazing. I never really heard it as a kid growing up. Just recently picked up a copy of Get the Knack and was pretty blown away.
 

DaveNJ

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,571
First album I ever bought with my own money when I was 11 or 12... Still love it...
 

ggwwbb

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,355
I had to learn the solo for a benefit show for my friend's sister who was sick with cancer. My friend is now a Grammy winning recording engineer and his old band (they were signed to A&M back in the day )got back together to do a reunion. My buddy also wanted to do a set of covers with some of his close friends and since I used to be known as the guy who knew all the solos to Pop songs note for note, he called and asked me to play. The only thing is, I never knew this solo. I tried to tell him but he didn't believe me. 'Dude, I remember you playing this for me years ago.'. 'Nah man I know all the Elliott Easton stuff and it seems like a solo I would know but honestly, I don't know it.' We went back and forth a few times and then I just shut up and said "Ok brother, let me go over it again."

Now I HAD to know it note for note so I set out to learn it. Man, it wasn't like back in the old days when I had nothing but time along with loads of fire and a never-ending supply of attention to detail. So, I learned the chord changes of the song first. Then went to all of the little twists of the riff. Ya know, when they accent certain parts, when the push certain parts etc... After which I focused on Berton's parts, his chord inversions and ultimately, the solo. I slowed it down with Audacity and took each section and perfected it. It took me a week of my busy schedule but I got it. Note for note.

The night of the benefit was a lot of fun. Lots of old friends getting together for the love of one our own. GREAT musicians. Lots of fun. 'My Sharona' was the last song of the night. The band for the tune was stellar and it felt AMAZING to have that tight, powerful backing pushing me as I launched into the extended solo. You never really hear this song performed live, let alone played correctly but the support of veteran players, I felt like I was sitting on a rocket ship blasting off. My pull-offs weren't as clean as they when I was learning them in my studio but I chalk that up to some good old adrenalin. The roar of the audience when we ended the song was awesome and even better was when a friend of mine who is celebrated player came up to me and said 'Beautiful man. ****ing NOTE FOR NOTE. AWESOME.'. I didn't write the solo but I sure presented it as best I could and having a chance to play it onstage with old friends who happen to be some of the strongest musicians going, in front of old friends and acquaintances, it was the stuff of teenage dreams.

Go for it. Learn the song. NOTE FOR NOTE. There are tons of extremely small details you need to cop to truly pull it off but DAMN if it isn't an old fashioned boost when you finally get it RIGHT.
GREAT story!!!!
 

Rockledge

Member
Messages
5,557
The single version of that song is great. The guitar work is fantastic, it is exactly appropriate for the song. And, songs is what it is all about. Less is more.
 

Teleking

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,894
The whole band was outstanding. Drummer was crazy good. They have a cool documentary about them that I watched. It was pretty awesome. The guitar player is playing the solo live and he nails it. Incredible solo.
 

HoboMan

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
17,274
I heard the edited version on the radio when it first came out.
My friend bought the cassette and we cranked it up in his car.
I couldn't believe it when I heard the unedited version. I immediately became a huge fan of Berton Averre and the whole band.

I wore our several copies of that cassette. Every song is great. Growing up in small town NC it really made a huge impact on me. If you listen to it closely there is some great guitar playing on there. The album was recorded at a total cost of $20,000. It sounds like it's basically them playing live. Very few overdubs, if any.

In 1985 I moved to Los Angeles. A couple of years after that I heard that the Knack was playing in a small club in Anaheim CA. Of course I went.
I was standing in the packed club and saw Doug Fieger talking with someone at the bar.
Coming from a small hick town and seeing one of your idols was very surreal to me. I walked over and stood a few feet away. Filler music was playing very loudly over the PA. All of a sudden Doug turns away from the bar and starts walking toward the stage.
As he got closer to me I held out my hand. He stopped and shook my hand and gave me a big smile. He then continued to the stage, strapped on his guitar and the band played a killer set.
A moment I'll never forget.

In the mid 90s I was in a cover band. The drummer was in another band that had Berton on guitar. They were looking for another guitar player and the drummer kept trying to get me to jam with them.
I should have done it but I was too intimidated to play with Berton. He is one of my favorite guitar players. I regret that decision to this day.

Here's a live clip from 1979. It's amazing how clean of a tone Berton is using.

 




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