Don't Let The Sun Catch You Crying - please check my chart transcription

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Clifford-D, Jan 23, 2012.

  1. Clifford-D

    Clifford-D Member

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    This is a beautiful blues tinged tune made famous by Ray Charles
    Written by Joe Green, I saw Robben Ford play it a couple days ago and
    he played it so sweetly I just about had leave to go get my guitar.

    Here's Ray Charles
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOsDT5wb0nI

    And here is the basic progression starting at the singing.

    A section
    .........................................................
    /.../........./.../
    ll: Fmaj7 Gm7 l Am7 Gm7 l Fmaj7 Gm l Fmaj7/A,, F13 B7 l
    ..........................

    l Bb7 Ab7 l G7 Gb7 l
    1............................................2........../.../..../......./
    l Fmaj7 Ab9 l Dbmaj7 Gb#11 :ll Fmaj7 l E7.... E7#9 E7b9 ll

    B section
    l A7..........l............l D7........l............l
    ./../../....../
    G7........Adim7. l A7 Dm/A l C9 C13 l Gm7 C7b9 ll

    C section

    .......................................................
    /.../........./.../

    l Fmaj7 Gm7 l Am7 Gm7 l Fmaj7 Gm l Fmaj7/A.. F13 B7 l
    ..........................

    l Bb7 Ab7 l G7 Gb7 l Fmaj7 Ab9 l Dbmaj7 Gb#11 ll


    This is a great song and it starts by getting the chart correct,,
    any corrections and additional stuff will be helpful.

    I'm looking at using three note voicings a lot, like Robben did.


     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2012
  2. JonR

    JonR Member

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    Here's what I get. There are some differences, but not significant ones.

    |Fmaj7 - Gm7 - |Am7 - Bbmaj7 - |Fmaj7 - Gm7 - |Am7 Bbmaj7 Cm7 B7#11 |
    |Bb7 - Ab13 - |G7 - Gbmaj7 - |F6 - Ab13 - |Dbmaj7 - C9 - |

    |Fmaj7 - Gm7 - |Am7 - Bbmaj7 - |Fmaj7 - Gm7 - |Am7 Bbmaj7 Cm7 B7#11 |
    |Bb7 - Ab13 - |G7 - Gbmaj7 - |F(7) - (Fmaj7) - |Bm7b5* E7b9 E7 - |

    |A7 - - - | - - - - |D7 - - - | - - - (D7b5)|
    |G7 - - (G7+) | (G13) - (G7) - |Gm7 - Db7 - |Gm7(b5) - Gb7b5 - |

    |Fmaj7 - Gm7 - |Am7 - Bbmaj7 - |Fmaj7 - Gm7 - |Am7 Bbmaj7 Cm7 B7#11 |
    |Bb7 - Ab13 - |G7 - Gbmaj7 - |F6 - - - |Dbmaj7 - C9 - |Bm7b5* E7 - - |


    1. The bass is Bb on beat 3 of bar 2, which makes it technically Bbmaj7 rather than Gm7, but Gm7 will obviously do. (This type of sequence often would go back to Gm7, not to Bbmaj7.)

    2. I'm pretty sure it goes through those 4 chords in bar 4. The Cm7 has an F in it, so is arguably Cm11 or F7sus/C. The B7 also has an F on top (#11).

    3. In the descending chords in bars 5-6, there's an F on each chord, so the last one is Gbmaj7, not Gb7. (Gb7 obviously works as a tritone sub for C7 going to F, but is not actually what's there.)

    4. In the 2nd A section, there's a slight hint of an Eb on the first F chord in bar 7, but probably insignificant - I can't hear it (or see it) beyond first beat.

    5. The "Bm7b5*" (beat 1 only) seems to be voiced like a Dsus4 with a B bass. IOW, no discernible F in the chord, but a clear G on top. (I'm only calling it "Bm7b5" because that's the conventional chord that's being implied there.)
    The backing vocal line runs down G-F-E, suggesting the b9 on the E7, but again not significant IMO.
    Ie, it's kind of like E7 for the whole bar, but with embellishments, starting with a sus4 and a #9, but seemingly ending up a plain E7. Of course, various alterations are optional!

    6. In bars 5-6 of the bridge it's just G7 for two bars. The bass does move, but only in a similar walking line as on the previous chords in the bridge.
    (On the D7 the bass plays Ab on beat 4, hence the D7b5 in brackets; ie not really a different chord.)
    On the G7, the bass runs |G-F-E-D|G-A-B-D|. The chord itself doesn't really change, except for a string line on top, which includes a passing D# on last beat of bar 5; but the bass is D, so it's just a chromatic approach to the E of the "G13". (I've put those chords in brackets because it's only what the string line suggests. There's a similar "13" implication on bar 2 of the A7.)

    7. The last 2 bars of the bridge is the most significant difference from yours (and still nothing too important). I hear a definite Db bass on beat 3 of bar 7; ie, a Db7 chord, not the C13 you have. The b5 on the Gm7 is little unclear; and the last chord of the bridge has one Gb bass note and one C. So call it either Gb7b5 or C7b5 (I wouldn't say it's quite a Gb7#11 or C7alt).
    Still, as with the other differences, your changes work fine. (I don't know how Robben Ford does it, but I guess his changes may be more like the ones you've got, or different again.)

    8. The C section in this version ends with a cadence to the bridge again (for the solo), but of course if you were returning to the A section then the changes you have are good.
     
  3. Clifford-D

    Clifford-D Member

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    Hey Jon, thanks for chiming in.

    My computer has a bad sound card or something, I only get sound from one side of my monitor, a 1" speaker. So I could never hear the bass.

    I have to take my son to school (music college) and when I get back I'll respond better.

    Let me ask you this, Would you call this a blues??
     
  4. JonR

    JonR Member

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    Not entirely, no. It's a traditional 32-bar AABA jazz standard (vintage pop standard) format.

    However, the way it goes to the IV7 chord in bar 5 (after a fancy 4-bar CESH* sequence on the tonic) does signal "blues" at that point. We could easily believe it will go on to be a slow 12-bar blues. The Ab7 chord has a strong bluesy charge to it; and it goes back to the tonic in bar 7, where we'd expect.
    So you could easily argue that the A sections on their own are an 8-bar blues sequence. 8-bar blues comes in a few different guises, and (if simplified to I-I-IV-I) this would be one of them; although one of the rarer sequences.

    The bridge, btw (as you may have spotted) is a "Rhythm changes" bridge; albeit heavily embellished with subs in the last 2 bars.

    I'm trying to think of some other songs in AABA format where one of the sections is in blues form. There is "Can't Buy Me Love", where the A sections are 12-bar blues, followed by an 8-bar (non-blues) bridge (aka "chorus" in that case) which also introduces the song.
    Another one is the standard "Black Coffee", which also has 12-bar A sections, and a more traditional 8-bar (non-blues) bridge.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KRxS7Q64xUQ
    It's kind of semantics, I guess, but I wouldn't call that "a blues" - the A sections are clearly 12-bar blues in form, but as a whole thing, the song isn't "a blues" (IMO that is). It's like a hybrid: mostly blues (ie every A section), but with a traditional bridge grafted on to give it an AABA pop song format. Same with Don't Let The Sun.

    IMO, for a song to be "a blues" (entirely), it would need to be a string of verses, all with the same sequence, whether that's 12 bars, 8 bars or one of the other common blues formats. (It could still have a chorus if the chorus just follows the same sequence.)
    IOW, authentic blues is a kind of "folk ballad" form, where verses could follow one another for as long as you like (as long as you can think of more verses, or more solos). As soon as a song contains a structure with a different section - a bridge, or a chorus with a different progression - then it moves towards Tin Pan Alley pop tradition (derived from classical Aria form originally).
    At least that's the way I see it.

    *CESH (for any readers who don't know) = contrapuntal elaboration of static harmony. IOW, a way to stop 4 bars of the same chord sounding boring, without really changing the chord properly.
     
  5. Clifford-D

    Clifford-D Member

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    Ain't Got Nothing But The Blues
    Living In A Fools Paradise,,,


    Jon, I don't think CESH (chromatic embellishment of static harmony) is a contrpuntal move. I thought it was an oblique move
    One tone moves through a static chord

    as in the classic Stairway-ish move

    Am...Am/M7..Am7..Am6
    -5-----5-----5-----5
    -5-----5-----5-----5
    -5-----5-----5-----5
    -7-----6-----5-----4
    --------------------
    --------------------

    ??
     
  6. JonR

    JonR Member

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    Well, it's defined as contrapuntal:
    http://acronyms.thefreedictionary.com/CESH

    Of course it can involve a chromatic line, as in the minor chord cliche used in Stairway. But (AFAIK) usually isn't.

    But then I like the way this site -
    http://www.apassion4jazz.net/glossary.html
    - describes it as a "foolish" term.

    Then again, it ain't the first music theory term to be used foolishly (yet accepted in some circles), and it sure wont be the last... ;)

    I did a search on the not-at-all-foolish allaboutjazz forum, and turned up all these threads, which each contain at least one mention of the term:
    http://forums.allaboutjazz.com/search.php?searchid=5526466
    - notice the first hit is on "My Funny Valentine", which contains the same CESH sequence as Stairway to Heaven.
     
  7. willyboy

    willyboy Member

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    Those lines are also commonly known as 'line cliches' as Teleman pointed out. George Benson's/Leon Russell's 'This Masquerade' has a similar line as well. Classical theory often uses different terms than what Jazz/Contemporary uses. Another common line cliche uses ascending chromaticism (minor, minor#5, minor6 chords) as in 'Secret Agent Man', Kashmir, etc. Perhaps historically those lines may have been conceived of contrapuntally, but they certainly aren't in the Rock and Jazz tunes I know of.
     
  8. Clifford-D

    Clifford-D Member

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    yes, line cliches,, also known as CESH
     

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