Dr Scientist RRR Batteries?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by DarkestChapter, May 19, 2011.

  1. DarkestChapter

    DarkestChapter Member

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    Hey guys,

    After days of contemplating which reverb pedal to get, I finally went for the Dr Scientist RRR. I have a quick and stupid question though... It doesn't seem like this pedal can take 9v batteries, so I'm wondering, can you only use it if you have an adapter?

    Thanks, and please excuse my ignorance!
     
  2. sketches

    sketches Member

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    Nope, no batteries!

    It would chew them like crazy but they're also BAD for the environment so the Dr doesn't use them where they aren't necessary!

    I still highly recommend them though and absolutely LOVE mine!
     
  3. DarkestChapter

    DarkestChapter Member

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    Cool, thanks for the reply! So the only way to use them is through an adapter?
     
  4. tibbon

    tibbon Member

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    I'm actually really curious to know about your desire to use batteries. I'm working on a few pedals (for my personal use only at the moment), but I'm leaving batteries out completely. I figure they are wasteful, take up precious space in a pedal, heavy and are even further away from being ideal voltage/current sources than a regulated power supply.

    Trying to figure out why people would still use them.
     
  5. DarkestChapter

    DarkestChapter Member

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    The only reason why I use batteries is because I am a university student who can't afford a power supply for my small board. It also helps that I have a cousin who is high up in an electronic store and supplies me with free 9 volt batteries.
     
  6. digiTED

    digiTED rock > talk

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    Just grab a 1spot (~$30 USD) until you can afford a PP2+ IMO. 1spots are more sensitive to crap house power, but generally work very well for lots of pedals, including the RRR. Just make sure any unused jacks on the daisychain are covered with the included caps; shorts can and do occur!
     
  7. mrbluetone

    mrbluetone Member

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    batteries are best for fuzz pedals mostly
     
  8. sketches

    sketches Member

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    Batteries are bad for the environment and do cost more in the long run. As digiTED said the 1spot adapters are cheap enough. You don't need a PP2+ either. There are great power supplies for cheaper such as the Diago Powerstation which has the power of about 2 and a half 1spot adapters and is much quieter. But yes, I highly suggest you invest in getting a 1spot before you do in a niche/expensive reverb pedal, as much as it pains me to say (hey I'm all for moar effects! ha ha... but there has to be a line drawn).
     
  9. Lanard

    Lanard Member

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    I prefer battery powered pedals just because there's less hassle involved. There's no need to carry different adapters, untangle cords, find a plug, use an extension cord, or worry about someone tripping over the extra wires. If you ever play on a big stage and are unfamiliar with where the outlets are, or if you have to set up on stage real quick, not having to find an outlet and plug in your pedals makes for less headaches. There are a lot of great analog pedals that use less than 10mA of power and a battery can last for months. Those are the ones I prefer. The only pedal I plug in now is a delay, though sometimes I'll still use an Ibanez AD9 that's fairly good on batteries. For me there's a satisfying simplicity to using a few battery powered pedals.
     
  10. magnus02

    magnus02 Member

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    that's a little absurd...

    you have to plug in your amp... bam, just found the outlet.

    i have a large board with a pp2 and some other adapters for pedals that don't work off a pp2 and i just run it all through a nice power strip which leaves me with a single plug to go into the wall next to my amp.

    a one spot or similar is quite cheap or you could just get a 9v adapter from your cousin and use that... other than fuzz, i've never hear of someone wanting to use batteries. in general they are very costly in the long run and you never know when they're gonna crap out...

    just build a board and wire it up with a one spot and use that single plug to power the whole thing...
     
  11. arem

    arem Member

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    Y'know, I get all that, but I don't use a board and would rather have the option of using a battery if I want to. I understand a power hungry pedal like the RRR not using batteries, but in a fuzz it's kind of ridiculous to insist on a power supply or nothing (or even worse, to charge extra for a battery clip!). There are a couple of pedals that I was very interested in but had to pass on because of this, the Algal Bloom for one.
     
  12. Lanard

    Lanard Member

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    If you ever play outdoor events, jam at an open mic, fly or take a cab to gigs, or if you live in a town where the clubs have equipment, you may not need to bring your own amp. Depending on the stage, you could be standing 20 feet away from the amp or an outlet. If you only have a few minutes to set up it's nice to keep it simple with battery powered pedals, then you have more time to try and get a good sound.
     

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