Dr Z Route 66 GAS

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by roblovesolives, Feb 20, 2012.

  1. roblovesolives

    roblovesolives Member

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    Dear All,

    Have a terrible case of GAS for a Drz Route 66. Have always lusted after Beano tone but most seem to think that this is very difficult to achieve without all the added studio bits!

    Love the way a head can be paired with different speakers to change it rather than a combo.

    Tonal reference points: Beano, Fresh Cream, Kossoff etc.

    Don't want SLP100 type gain or fuzziness.

    I know lots of people will say get a JTM45 but, the marshall JTM45 is not really very good and you cannot get the boutique ones over here very easily or cost effectively (germino, metro, Louis Electric).

    Any thoughts?

    Haven't heard any bad things about the Rt 66. Is my GAS justified?

    Ta,

    Rob
     
  2. Adman103

    Adman103 Member

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    A 66 will do Beano easily! It's gonna be loud though. It's a thick, and warm amp.
     
  3. markmantle

    markmantle Member

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    the 66 can easily do that type of sound, it's pretty much what it was designed to do.

    I have one. I stare at it every day at the moment, because I moved overseas, and need a new cabinet for it... and being the picky guy that I am, the one I want is quite expensive, so I'm just saving up at the moment... also need to get a step down transformer (mine is built for North American power)... but anyways.. I love my 66, it is really loud, but its great.

    Just got back some recordings I did with it in a studio back home, and I really like the tone I got running my sunface into the 66 with my strat.. just great.

    If you use humbuckers with the 66 turn all knobs to 3:00 and roll your tone knob down, you should be in beano heaven.

    Some say the 66 is a one trick pony... but I beg to differ.. I think it's a great pedal platform and an all around great amp for many styles.
     
  4. acoupland

    acoupland Member

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    I personally love the zwreck and feel like it can do "that sound" with the right guitar + speaker choice, which is really a huge part of it (other than the playing of course)

    There are some boutique companies in EU doing TW rocket / AC30 style amps which are along the lines of all of this. A rocket with el34 or kt66 output section would be great

    Then again, there are some good-priced boutique options in EU for 18w / 36w style marshall amps - not sure your opinion on that direction
     
  5. rawkguitarist

    rawkguitarist Member

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    I've become a huge Dr. Z fan in the last year. They're among the finest built amps available. Yet, they're readily available...

    I have a Z28 and KT45 - amps that share similar circuit DNA with the Route 66. They're extremely unique amps and I couldn't be happier. I say go for it.
     
  6. bbigsby

    bbigsby Member

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    Look elsewhere. Route 66 will not give you a beano tone. I bought one and it shinned brilliantly with single coils, but with humbuckers it was too flat.

    I bought a Metro JTM45 clone and that was the sound. Save your money and get a JTM45 clone.
     
  7. coreybox

    coreybox Member

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    Mine sounds fine with my dual humbucker PRS.
     
  8. roblovesolives

    roblovesolives Member

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    The problem is you can't get amps like metro or germino etc over here without it being ridiculous. I looked into it but by the time you have paid shipping, import duty, different transformer etc it is silly. That is why I looked into Dr Z and most people seem very positive about it doing what I want. It's the same with cabs. You can't get Avatar etc over here.

    Rob
     
  9. rawkguitarist

    rawkguitarist Member

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    I don't get people trying to *nail* particular player's tones....

    If you like those tones, just get a great amp *first* but that can get in the ball park of you favorite player's tones. From that standpoint the Route 66 will be great.
     
  10. stratpaulguy86

    stratpaulguy86 Member

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    Dude, don't you live in the UK... Marshalls are much cheaper over there right? I don't know what a RT66 will run you over there but I'd probably buy a Marshall RI and mod it, or find someone who will build you a clone. I would try the Z because I love all of his amps, if it has the sound you want then it's a no brainier. I'm a little superficial though so when I'm doing Cream stuff there better be a Gibson in my hands and a Marshall logo on my amp.
     
  11. cratz2

    cratz2 Member

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    I've kind of wanted a Route 66 for about 5 or 6 years now. It's not really 'me' and there are two or three other amps on my list, but I think I might eventually get one.
     
  12. billyguitar

    billyguitar Member

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    I had a Route 66 and liked it very much but I never got the Beano comparison. Maybe if you had it into a 4x12 box with Celestion Blues. It would blow a pair of blues pretty quick. I know it's only 32 watts but it's a really THICK 32 watts.
     
  13. rambleon223

    rambleon223 Member

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    What would you compare it to tonally if it doesn't produce similar tones to the old Bluesbreaker? I ask because I've been gassing pretty hard for one too and have contemplated moving my Carmen Ghia or old Pro Reverb to pick one up.

    Dan

     
  14. billyguitar

    billyguitar Member

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    The Marshall Bluesbreaker? I've got one I bought in '89. It doesn't sound like the Route 66. To me the 66 is not really comparable to anything else, except Z's own Z28, except the Z28 does not have the super thick mids. The 66 also needs bright speakers to have anywhere near the Beano slice. I'd say if you're dying to try one to sell the Carmen Ghia. They aren't too hard to replace with another later on.
     
  15. ArcNSpark

    ArcNSpark Member

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    I had a 66 and a 45 same amp different power tubes
    and u could really hear the difference. KT66 Fat and Creamy
    EL34 punchy with more top end . What makes these amps
    really unique is the EF86 preamp. Has tone and feel like
    No other amp Ive played. Very brilliant chimey sound with
    A breakup in the top end almost like treble booster. You'll either
    love or not. Really should play one first. I do miss the 66 and
    have thought about picking up another many times.
     
  16. vmjoe

    vmjoe Member

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    Germino's have a variable voltage control on the back to accomodate different areas of the world.

    I had a Route 66 and liked it very much, but imo, if you want a true Marshall tone, you will either need to go with Marshall or a boutique (such as a Germino) that is designed to replicate a particular Marshall.

    I've owned 2 Dr. Z amps (EZG-50 being the other) and they are wonderful amps, but I feel like they have their own characteristics. By that I mean, they do a good job of replicating certain amps (the EZG-50 is designed to replicate a beefed up black face Fender) as intended, but they still have their own distinguishable voice. To me, the Germino sounds about as close to original "Plexi" amps as anything I've ever heard.
     
  17. rambleon223

    rambleon223 Member

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    Yeah, I meant Bluesbreaker/Beano tone. I swore I was content with the CG when folks were telling me that once you buy one Z you'll want to try them all.....lol. I at least want to try the Z28 and Route 66, will be looking to nab a Route 66 sometime this spring probably. I figured if nothing else it would be a nice complement to my old Bassman and Pro Reverb. I do like the Ghia a lot too but I think I may be over EL84 based designs these days.

     
  18. vmjoe

    vmjoe Member

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    One other thing I'd like to add is that unlike master volume amps, plexi or plexi style amps need higher volumes to attain certain saturation levels. With "mv" amps, much of the gain comes from the preamp section (primarilly the EF806 with a Route 66). Although many "mv" amps do a good job replicating this power section saturation, imo there is still a difference. I'm not saying the difference is better in one than the other, only different. The dynamics of a great single channel, non master volume amp is rediculous imo. Truly a beautiful tone.
     
  19. Fireball XL5

    Fireball XL5 Supporting Member

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    I used to own a Route 66 as well as a Germino Classic 45 (JTM45) at the same time. Both are GREAT sounding amps BTW, but tonally pretty different IMO. The Germino is a dead on knock off of the classic JTM 45 Marshall amp, whereas the Route 66 - while still having some Marshally qualities - really has it's own thing going on tonally.

    You always hear/read that the Route 66 is very JTM 45-ish, and while there's some truth to that - when compared directly to a JTM45 the Z amp has WAY more midrange to it's overall voice no matter how you e.q. it, and it operates in a much narrower dynamic range as well.

    It's tone controls only add Bass & Treble up until noon on the dial, and anything beyond that adds gain to those respective frequencies rather than more Treble or Bass. So depending upon your ears, speakers used, and what you like tonally, the Z can come off as sounding a bit one-dimensional.

    I'll admit, I stuggled with this when I first got the amp, but I came to really enjoy the 66's midrange energy and unique tone controls once I got the hang of it. The amp always sounds fat (even at lower levels), and the bass always stays tight regardless of how hard you are driving the amp.

    In comparison, a JTM45 has a much more open and glassy tone with far less of the uber-present midrange of the Route 66. Beacause of that, I find the clean tones on a JTM45 to have a more 3D quality than the Route 66.

    When pushed, a JTM45 gets a great open crunchy overdrive that is more on the bluesy side of the fence than an EL34 JMP Marshall, and it's distortion is voiced over a much wider dynamic range as well. Less mids, higher highs, and deeper lows than on a Route 66. Unlike the Z, a JTM45 can get flubby on the low end when pushed hard, but nothing that can't be corrected for with judicious settings of the Bass control.

    I used to play both amps through a 4x12 loaded with Greenbacks and both amps sounded killer for Classic Rock. Both amps are extremely pedal friendly as well.

    To sum it up, I'd say that if someone is seeking the most authentic JTM45 tone, go with a Germino, Metro, or Marshall copy that is designed to emulate that amp. If interested in looking for something that sits squarely in the old Marshall camp - but with a twist - then the Route 66 might be your cup of tea. Both are great amps, but a Route 66 is certainly no JTM45 and vise versa.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2012
  20. roblovesolives

    roblovesolives Member

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    Thanks for that last post. What I wanted to hear.

    I think that, realistically, even if you get a completely accurate replica of a series II BB down to the last piece of solder it won't sound like Eric for a multitude of reasons.

    I think the best thing is to work out what ballpark you want to play in and put your own spin on it- using some well known tonal reference points is helpful to communicate what's in your head but you're deluded if you think you will ever be able to completely clone someone else.

    As an illustration of this, listen to the our different versions of Machine Gun from the BOG 69/71 NYE shows. All same gear, same chap, same recording equipment. All different tones.

    Ta very,

    Rob

    ps Route 66 sounds ideal to me!!!!
     

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