Dragon head shell build for an SLP

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by Geeze, Jul 4, 2019.

  1. indeedido

    indeedido Supporting Member

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    AMAZING!!!
     
  2. DonaldDemon

    DonaldDemon Member

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    Fantastic work as always Russ. Are you using dado blades for the finger joint cuts? The biggest mistake I made in my tiny wood shop was buying a DeWalt job site table saw that can't accept dados. I've never learned proper joinery because of that limitation though I've made some attempts at a simple rabbet joint with a router. I'd love to hear more about your process.
     
  3. Hulakatt

    Hulakatt Supporting Member

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    @Geeze , I think we need a family shot of your cab projects! Easily the worst thing about these build threads of yours are that they are too short and quick.
     
  4. Geeze

    Geeze Silver Supporting Member

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    Well, you could come visit on your way to Nashville...

    Russ
     
  5. Geeze

    Geeze Silver Supporting Member

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    Thank you!

    Funny, I started off with a job site saw in '96. When I cut wood the height wheel would turn and sink the blade - lots o nasty words at that point. So I returned it and got a 3HP full cast iron top saw. Mucho better.

    Horsepower is the first requirement for wider dados and a great set of stack able blades. Less than 3HP means you must feed the wood very slowly to keep from bogging down the saw and introducing more vibration. Another instant upgrade for ANY belt driven saw are braided belts - worth every penny - kills harmonic vibration and noise.

    I used a Forrester set for years worked fine but I always had to shim to get to .750" and generally had to bash the joints together. Then I bought a Freud carbide set - wow! Stack 'em in and .750" on the nose. Cuts everything flat and smooth. If you find as you cut that one of the blades cuts lower than the rest you've got a low spot on your arbor [the threaded gizmo you put the blades on]. Experiment loosening, rotating a bit [a sharpie mark as you go] and retightening until the blades cut the same - . Then scratch a mark on top of the arbor flange so you don't have to find it again.

    A good square jig is a requirement and consistent pressure. I always push it toward the left as I cut and I can hold .002" going across the board - that means the joints are snug [no gaps] and don't need a mallet to 'help' them together. The Forrest's always needed help.

    A stiff backer board the same height as the jig will prevent or at least minimize tear out. I use a pair of 4" vise grip clamps on either side of the board to hold the board still. Never been a fan of finger holding.

    All of this can be done with a router - I'm not a fan mostly for the noise [I'm skirting the power tool regulations so I don't want to piss off the neighbors].

    Before I moved I had access to every wood and machine tool on the planet through friends. Ask around your buddies / relatives if they have gear you can use. Dallas TX has a 40,000 sqft facility called the Makers Space and they have EVERYTHING there and the month dues are reasonable. I suspect other metro areas may have something similar.

    Holler if you have more questions.

    Russ
     
  6. DonaldDemon

    DonaldDemon Member

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    Great, thanks! I do have a facility near me that I can rent, I'm seriously thinking of getting a part time membership. At this point, I'm at the limit for my super tiny basement woodshop, no more room for big power tools and certainly not a proper sized table saw with an iron top. The DeWalt works fine but is not meant for fine woodworking. Your stuff is an inspiration!
     
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  7. Geeze

    Geeze Silver Supporting Member

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    Good luck and dream big!

    The other great wood working quote I stole from a buddy who taught himself how to build acoustic guitars from scratch replied when he was ask 'How did you learn to build such beautiful things?' His reply 'Cause I'm will to f*** s*** up on the way to here!'

    Russ
     
  8. Hulakatt

    Hulakatt Supporting Member

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    Next time I get sent to OK for work training, I'll give you a shout! I was just there in May and I learned that I really am better off driving the 17 hrs myself rather than flying and being stuck in a hotel for 3 weeks with no car.
     
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  9. Geeze

    Geeze Silver Supporting Member

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    A couple of final bits - bottom is painted

    [​IMG]

    Face plate is mounted

    [​IMG]

    Still don't have a handle as I haven't found a black one I like yet.

    Russ
     

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