Dropped my power cord in calcium chloride, should I toss it?

3Sides

Member
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336
Well I was taking my brand new power cord out of the package and didn't realise that the female end had dropped to the floor and landed in my container of DRY OUT dehumidifier container. So the female end was probably in the solution of calcium chloride and water for about a minute before I realized where it was. I quickly rinsed it with tap water for about a minute, but I fear that in the end it may corrode and I should not use it for my amp.

Any thoughts?
 

John Phillips

Member
Messages
13,038
If you rinsed it thoroughly in clean water, then dried it completely, it should be fine.

Water is not actually a problem with electrical equipment as long as it's not present when the gear is powered up. I will sometimes deliberately wash gear (including cables) - it's fine if everything is dried out really well afterwards.

What you don't want is conductive deposits, including salts such as the calcium chloride! But they're entirely water-soluble, so if you wash it well there should be no problem.

The worst of the lot is the sort of greasy, carbon-bearing grime that gets into gear which is gigged regularly in smoky venues. This is both conductive and difficult to get off... and is attracted to electronic gear (especially tube) by the high voltages inside, which act like an electrostatic air cleaner. Add a cooling fan to ensure a continuous supply of sweaty, smoky air and you have a sure-fire way of coating the insides of your stuff with this muck...
 

3Sides

Member
Messages
336
What I did was let it sit in a cup of water for a couple of minutes and then took it out and spun it around to get the water out. Maybe I will rinse it one more time to be sure.

Thanks
 

fullerplast

Senior Member
Messages
6,781
Originally posted by John Phillips
The worst of the lot is the sort of greasy, carbon-bearing grime that gets into gear which is gigged regularly in smoky venues. This is both conductive and difficult to get off... and is attracted to electronic gear (especially tube) by the high voltages inside, which act like an electrostatic air cleaner. Add a cooling fan to ensure a continuous supply of sweaty, smoky air and you have a sure-fire way of coating the insides of your stuff with this muck...
Yeah, you got that right John! You should see the inside of my PA's power amp...even the fan blades have a thick coating of this junk on them. I'm dreading having to clean it out.:eek:
 




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