Duplicate Single Mic Tracks vs Dual Micing

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by shawntp, May 14, 2008.

  1. shawntp

    shawntp Member

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    So I stumbled across the dilemma above today playing around in my home/hobby studio. I've almost always dual miced my Carr combo amp at home. I used to use an SM57 and a TLM103 into an Apogee duet. I recently found the TLM103 was not ideal for use in my high ceiling/downtown condo I was writing in so I punted it and picked up an SM7b.

    Today I was dual micing with the SM7b and the SM57 and played around with duplicating/moving the tracks around and felt just duping the SM7b's track to be two tracks and panning a little yielded a better/clearer sound image.

    Anyone not even bother dual micing? I suppose it depends what mic's you are using as before I had a condenser which one probably wouldnt want solo on guitars - but the SM7b seems to do a better job by itself.

    I am also now wondering if I should try a similar technique on my Acoustic - I have a Rode NT5 stereo condenser - I wonder if I could get a better mic like an SM81 and do the same technique.

    I must say in a home office hobby studio there is something nice about the idea of only fudging with one mic at a time to lay down tracks.

    Any tips/suggestions/idea's on the above?
     
  2. Bryan T

    Bryan T Guitar Owner Silver Supporting Member

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    Are you doing anything different with the second track (EQ, compression, etc.)? If not, then you don't need to duplicate it - just bring up the fader of the mono track and adjust the panning for the same effect.

    Bryan
     
  3. chrisgraff

    chrisgraff Member

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    two mics isn't always better. Sometimes, phase issues make things worse than if you just use the one mic.

    Rather than duplicating the track, try doubling it. That would yield a wider image than the other options you mentioned.
     
  4. shawntp

    shawntp Member

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    I tried a couple different things - when I say I duplicate the track - I am creating a second track and then panning the two apart a bit. I am playing around with EQ/effects on each but nothing is solid yet to warrant even having it in stereo I guess on this one.

    I also tried just nudging the second track a little forward.

    With all the options and the limited conditions/time/space/assistance in a home/hobby studio I guess there isnot really a need. Ive always just had this idea in my head that you have to use two mics.
     
  5. Sunbreak Music

    Sunbreak Music Member

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    Definitely.
     
  6. MichaelK

    MichaelK Member

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    Creating an identical duplicate is the same as duplicating, yup. It's still a mono track, duplicating it adds to the volume somewhat. Panning them apart from each other just changes the balance left to right.

    Which probably made it sound "phasey" and weak.

    Try tracking the same part twice and pan the two takes apart.
     
  7. jackaroo

    jackaroo Member

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    I must agree...all you're doing is making more of the same signal by making a copy. I find that most electric guitar is best in mono anyway. Just get a nice sound from one source, or blend two mics if you like- I've found it just get a little weird sounding unless it's perfectly in phase.

    Acoustic? I like using two mics a lot. I tend to put one by the soundhole, and another in front of my fingering hand. I move the guitar a bit sometimes to change the balance and it can be quite effective- especially in solo applications. Oftentimes, the second mic (the one by the left hand) is panned opposite the one on the soundhole. This just widens the image and gives a bit of space, air and dimension to the sound. It can be very cool. Here's an example-

    http://soundclick.com/share?songid=6027222

    Have fun!

    J
     

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