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durability of solid wood?

music321

Member
Messages
3,793
assuming that an acoustic has a solid top, what sort of durability would it have if the rest of the body were laminate as opposed to solid wood? resistance to humidity? thanks.
 

RustyAxe

Member
Messages
3,012
assuming that an acoustic has a solid top, what sort of durability would it have if the rest of the body were laminate as opposed to solid wood? resistance to humidity? thanks.
Tops and backs crack from humidity, but it's rare for it to happen on the sides. You are looking to make a choice for the wrong reasons. There is no reason (in my mind) to buy any instrument for its "resistance to humidity" or durability ... when some proper care can eliminate the perceived problem. A $20 case humidifier and 15 minutes of time every week during drier seasons is all it takes. The tone and projection of most laminated guitars is usually not as good as solid woods ... a generality, but true because most laminated guitars occupy the lower end of the guitar price spectrum (under $1000).
 

zombywoof

Member
Messages
4,706
In the end it comes down to the fact that there is laminate and there is laminate. The good stuff will be two or so even slices of the same wood glued together. The el cheapo variety will be a nice veneer glued to some cheap filler stuff.
 

Gearaddict

Member
Messages
1,431
I never understood the cost savings or the saving the environment sidebar issue. Seems easier and cheaper to use one layer as opposed to laminations. I can't hear a tonal difference with lam back and sides.
 

music321

Member
Messages
3,793
i can see it not being cheaper to use one layer since an entire piece has to be flawless, where filled voids can be used in laminate. Assuming a solid piece will crack more easily when formed (I'm pretty sure it will, if I remember correctly), then waste must be added into the equation.
 






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