E-harmonix Pitchfork

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by teleman1, Mar 27, 2015.

  1. teleman1

    teleman1 Supporting Member

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    I have had the OC-2 & OC-3 Boss and was under welmed by them both. Most octave machines have fuzz built into the the sound. I like the clean octaves too. So far the Pitchfork is extraordinary. The Glissando part gives you organ. With an appropriate O/D I get a decent Quasimodo organ sound. Can't wait to couple that with my Mini vent. The baritone just might be well enough to induce me to sell my baritone electric Dano. The octave stuff is very very cool. It tracks well. And its is cheap for what you get.
     
  2. van_delay

    van_delay Member

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    I just got one of these pedals. I was excited for a few specific applications:

    1) 12-string simulator
    2) Organ/pad sounds
    3) Baritone drop tuning
    4) Bass guitar simulator

    The 12-string sounds (+1 octave, ~25% wet) are decent, but not excellent. The upper octaves still have a very trebley digital sound. I've found that the mix should be kept just shy of 9 o'clock if you want it to not sound too fake. If you switch to neck pickup and roll back the guitar tone knob it helps too.

    The organ swells are great for the +/-1 and 2 octaves. Wonderful sounds.

    My favorite is probably the drop tuning (-interval of choice, 100% wet). I love that I can very convincingly get a baritone sound from my standard tuning guitar. If you shift more than a 4th down it starts to not sound as nice, but any less than that is excellent.

    The bass simulator (-1 octave, 100% wet) is not overwhelming, but works in a pinch.

    An application that I found I really like was the +/- detune interval setting at ~50% wet. This gives you a really nice static-pitch-shift dimensional chorus effect (think Boss DC-2 or Neunaber Chroma). I was going to add a chorus pedal to my board, but the Pitch Fork can cover those duties.

    Overall the pedal tracks really fast and the polyphonic tracking is very good. Amazingly versatile pedal to have on your board.
     
  3. jsytsma

    jsytsma Member

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    I'm struggling a bit the more I play with the Pitch Fork. The higher octave (which is my primary usage) sounds REALLY treble-y and tinny - I put just a TOUCH of it in and it can be overpowering. The bass octave sounds decent, and they both sound really good when I add fuzz.

    But the more I play with it, the more I'm wondering if there's something out there that would sound more natural...
     
  4. Blakemore

    Blakemore Member

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    I would love to find an upper 5th octave/harmonizer pedal that was slightly warmer and that had less background hiss. (very noticeable into a dirty amp)
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2015
  5. NewDr.P

    NewDr.P Member

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    i had an EHX micro pog and thought it sounded very good, the octave up treble sounded natural.
     
  6. playguitar6789

    playguitar6789 Supporting Member

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    I think the Pitch Fork does a pretty good job. In general, pitch shifting effects are going to change tone and be a bit cheesy. It's kinda just the nature of the effect. But I think it's a great tool for a versatile board. I was even happy with going a half step up or down at 100% mix instead of down tuning or using a capo. Sure, there's a bit of latency and tone differences, but it's hardly noticeable in a band mix and worth that flexibility (think, playing an open-E tune in Eb). I also like the detune mode for chorus and +/- 1 octave for swells.
     
  7. teleman1

    teleman1 Supporting Member

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    Solo this thing is fun. Your favorite OD will get lots more mileage in front of this baby. And change the palette nicely. I haven't incorporated it, but can't wait to play with chorus and delay.
     
  8. gibs5000

    gibs5000 Member

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    POG2, if it still sounds unnatural, adjust the low pass filter so as to cut the high treble frequencies, this has been my go to for organ/ 12 string sounds that still sound natural.
     
  9. teleman1

    teleman1 Supporting Member

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    Anyone else digging this pedal?
     
  10. lefort_1

    lefort_1 Nuzzled Firmly Betwixt Gold Supporting Member

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    I know nothing of the internal implementation of the Pitchfork, nor the algorithms they chose (if it's a digital/small DSP design), but I can tell you that the harmonic content of low octaves vs upper octaves in an organ are not the same. And they are drastically different between the reed and diapason (flute) voices. So when an organ adds on those octaves, it's not just the same note/up an octave with the fundamental note's harmonic content octave'd in the same manner. Plus with a Hammond (and others) you can control the volume of that added octave with a drawbar..I'm ignoring foldback here).This organ notes have their own oscillators (either tonewheel or discrete osc's like in the pipe organs I worked on) and their harmonic content is different (good ears on ya' !!).

    If the Pitchfork had the equivalent of the 'feedback loop' in some delay pedals (like Skreddy's Echo), then one could do some filtering per your need, but that still wouldn't quite be the same...plus you couldn't add a bit of grit with a low octave** reed and avoid the high octave ear-rip like you can on an organ.

    To my way of thinking, the Pitchfork is too 'general-purpose' of a tool to be great at an organ imitation, unless you want 'all flutes' into a clean amp.

    just another 2 cents

    **edit: iirc, Hammond added some odd-order harmonics to the lower octaves. on the wide-version tone-generators.
    These were not present in the upper octaves... again, iirc.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2015
  11. drbob1

    drbob1 Silver Supporting Member

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    lefort has an interesting point, the more complex an organ was, the less effective the pedal will be in copping the sound. The OP's original point, that most octave devices add fuzz, is because the ones that he's referring to are analog, and add the octaves by multiplying or dividing the signal, which introduces distortion. Digital methods use sampling and frequency shifting to get the effect, which is much more subtle. That said, I haven't found a pitch shifter of any kind that does a smooth octave up. The hex pickup based Roland VG8/88/99 is probably the best, only having to process one string at a time. The newer algorithms in the Digitech Whammy/Drop and the EH Pitchfork/POG2 are better but still kind of clunky. Not sure what to suggest if you want pristine pitch shifting, but I think Roland might be the way to go.
     
  12. Dr. Jimmy

    Dr. Jimmy Member

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    Is it best to run it before or after OD?
     
  13. van_delay

    van_delay Member

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    I wish the Pitch Fork would have a low-pass filter on the upper octave(s) signal; it would go a long way towards reducing the metallic digital artifacts. But for a little over a hundred bucks and a small foot-print you can easily live with it.
     
  14. lefort_1

    lefort_1 Nuzzled Firmly Betwixt Gold Supporting Member

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    Since the Pitchfork has a Blend control, I'll wonder this aloud:

    If it's an analog blend, wouldn't that be a good place to tap in and place a little filter in-line on the 'octave' side to try to gain a little control over the octaves... I'm thinking 'toss that octave signal over to a little 2-4 band parametric EQ' and tweak the daylights out of the annoying stuff. Again, it's not replacement for an organ, but it might be worth a try ... plus you try adding dirt/fuzz or other noise to the octaves ...

    It's all fun-n-games till someone puts a Tiger Boost or TornsPeaker in there ;)

    Certainly someone has a Pitchfork they'd like to offer up on the sacrificial alter.
    :needs a soldering-iron/boowahahahaha smiley here:

    EDIT :
    I DO have an all-tube circuit that transforms nicely behaved, sinusoidal-ish guitar signals into obnoxious, drastically asymmetric, harmonically R&P'd reed-like toans. But I doubt anyone is going to want to hang a Mothership-sized toan-mangler on the side of their mini-box pedal board, just to get that limited functionality.
     

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