Ear Training-- Best way to hear intervals

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by squeally dan, Jun 19, 2008.

  1. squeally dan

    squeally dan Member

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    I've been playing a long time and gig regularly, but my eaer still stinks. I know this is because I have been busy wanking scales isntead of training my ear some. Whats the best way to get better at hearing different intervals?
     
  2. derekd

    derekd Supporting Member

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    I have been taking vocal lessons, mostly solfegio sorts of stuff to help my ear. My voice is decent, but I am doing it so I can improve my ear mostly. It is part of my efforts to be able to play what I hear in real time.

    I also bought Guitar College's Theory for the Road, which are some ear training cds I listen to some when driving. Could DIY pretty easily. Dunno if those are helpful suggestions or not.
     
  3. guildchild

    guildchild Member

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    learn melodies that blatantly feature certain intervals.

    for example:
    p4 = amazing grace (a = R; maz = 4)
    p5 = top gun theme
    M6 = my bonnie (?) lies over the ocean

    so, find some tunes that you can sing/hear instantly in your head and figure out some of those interval jumps and you're there.

    then give yourself a tonic, sing the interval and then play it to check your accuracy.

    good luck, and remember that every minute spent doing this is FAR more valuable that learning the next lick (imho).
     
  4. mark norwine

    mark norwine Member

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    b5 (tritone) = The simpsons (the = R; Simp = b5)....or Maria (West Side Story). Same thng
     
  5. brad347

    brad347 Member

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    the "best way" is almost always a combination of "every way you can think of."

    For example, the method outlined above, of using "reference melodies," works fine in a vacuum and is a good start, but it breaks down a bit as a useful device when the interval is in the middle of a cluster of notes, when the interval is in a different key or mode, a different quality of chord, or when you're in an actual music-making situation that doesn't allow you to sing little tunes to yourself.

    A minor third feels a bit different when it's the lower two notes of a minor triad versus the upper two of a major triad, you know?

    It's a good thing, over the course of your ear training, to figure out ways to hear intervals, triads, tetrads, etc. in as many contexts as possible.
     
  6. giggedy

    giggedy Member

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  7. Austinrocks

    Austinrocks Member

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  8. squeally dan

    squeally dan Member

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    I was looking at Tomo's AYGP1 and I noticed their is a section on interval training that would help me. I think I kinda skipped that upon first listen and went straight to the fun stuff.
     
  9. dewey decibel

    dewey decibel Supporting Member

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    A good way to start is to learn to tell the difference between specific ones. Start with the distance from a root, the easiest is probably the difference between a major 3rd and a minor 3rd. It's pretty easy, one's happy and ones sad. Another easy one would be a major 7th vs a dominant 7th. Then maybe a 4th vs 5th. Just go on like that until you start to get it, and then try and put it in context. Listen to a pop song and try and figure out what the notes and intervals are to the melody. You don't even have to know the key, just how far a note is away from the root. Ten grab your instrument and see if you're right.
     
  10. sinner

    sinner Member

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    Thanks for the links! I just did the good ear simple interval tests, so far 25 out of 25 correct! Pretty basic but better than I thought I'd do.

    I just started a thread about getting a little handheld device to load with software like the good ear trainer, to have in your pocket everywhere you go, I hope I get some advise about this.
     
  11. jared_t

    jared_t Member

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    i think the best way to be able to hear it is to be able to sing it.
    Also associating intervals with songs you know is a good idea.
    But i still believe singing the intervals out is the best way to train your ears.
     
  12. dimas4108

    dimas4108 Member

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    I have to say I stopped playing for 15 years and now I'm playing again I feel my ear improved over the years away from playing. Anyone else feel that way. Also singing and playing Star Spangle Banner is a great one for that
     

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