Ear training in the car?

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by tsvaughn, Nov 10, 2004.

  1. tsvaughn

    tsvaughn Guest

    Can anyone recommend an ear training program on CD that you DON'T need a book for? I'm looking for something I can do while driving.

    Thanks.
     
  2. lhallam

    lhallam Member

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    Up there in Silver Spring and got a long commute on the Beltway?

    David L Burge Relative Pitch Ear Training course. There is some stuff you are going to have to do while not driving, but as far as the drilling goes which is ca 95% of the course, you can do that in the car. 45 minute a day.

    Got any questions, feel free to e-mail me.
     
  3. Pete2

    Pete2 Member

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    I saw your review on this a couple months ago. Would you say that the work you've done has stuck with you, or do you need to keep drilling to stay fresh? Are you still as enthusiastic about the course as you were when you were in the middle of it?

    Pete
     
  4. lhallam

    lhallam Member

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    Still doing it. I hate to say, that I've been stuck on one drill for quite some time. I refuse to cheat and continue on without really passing it.

    Yes, it sticks with you pretty much. The ability to sing intervals at moments notice hasn't stuck as much, but hearing them has. For example, I can hear all the intervals until I'm bored on that on-line interval website that Joe posted . No problem. When I got out of college I certainly couldn't.

    Yes, I'm still enthusiastic. It's friggin tough, no mistake and you've got to stick it out and you've got to do what he says.

    I hope that some other folks who have since purchased the course would chime in here. I'm very interested in others opinions.
     
  5. Pete2

    Pete2 Member

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    Can you listen to regular music and hear the intervals pop out? I read a review someplace that said outside of the environment of the drills, they were having trouble applying it.

    Pete
     
  6. Pedro58

    Pedro58 Supporting Member

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    It's like anything else taught in isolation. It requires repeated practice and failure. I can teach my students certain grammar concepts, but do they use them? Do they recognize them in other people's speaking and writing? Not right away, but eventually they do. Putting a drill into practice in the real world is ALWAYS going to involve time and intital frustration. Burge shows you a way, shows you the path, but you have to work for it.
     
  7. lhallam

    lhallam Member

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    That's a little difficult to answer. Can I hear all the intervals as a melody goes whizzing by? No.

    Do some intervals pop out? Yes.

    Can I sing a melody and figure out the intervals and write them down? Yes, but not to 100% accuracy and it takes time. It also depends upon the melody.

    Do I feel that I have a better ear as a result of the course?

    Absolutely.

    I was at a jam and the guitarist just hit a chord while I was setting up. Instantly I heard a G7 chord. So the keyboard player whipped out a chord and in a flash I heard Cmin6/9.

    However, I can't listen to a song and immediately identify all the chords but I'm working on it.

    I'm not sure how anyone could create a more comprehensive course but that doesn't mean there isn't one out there.

    If there is, I'd purchase it in a flash over any amp or gtr.
     
  8. markp

    markp Member

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    After Ihallam ear training thread I started doing The Berg in my work truck and shortly after that work got me a brand new truck that only has FM radio only and no CD and no cassett.
    When I go down to the basement at home I forget the ear training and just pick up the guitar.
     
  9. jzucker

    jzucker Supporting Member

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    Try singing the intervals you see on license plates.
     
  10. EricT

    EricT Member

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    I'll try to do a review of my first couple of weeks with the course in another thread. I've only done up to level 5 on both courses, been way too busy to work on it more than just now and then...:(
    I can tell you, though, that my ear has really improved just from those few lessons, I feel my ear is more open and I'm much more aware of the different intervals when listening to music(i.e. the harmonies between the different instruments).
    I can't name them yet, but I'm much better at hearing them and singing them out correctly.
    It's all hard work, though, you get nothing for free...
     
  11. lhallam

    lhallam Member

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    Well said Pedro.

    Thanks Eric and Mark.
     
  12. tsvaughn

    tsvaughn Guest

    Thanks, lhallam. I used to do singing exercises in the car and that was a great use of the time. Now that I'm not singing in a band, I'm looking for something different. I'll look into the Burge stuff.
     
  13. tsvaughn

    tsvaughn Guest

    Wow, it's expensive. $299. Maybe after Xmas...
     
  14. TonyV

    TonyV Member

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  15. Pete2

    Pete2 Member

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    fyi - you can get the Burge course a bit cheaper on ebay-- either new for $239, or else slightly used (i.e., someone returned it with the money back guarantee) for less than that-- $180-200-ish.

    Pete
     
  16. lhallam

    lhallam Member

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    Have you tried these books? If so, could you please elaborate?

    Which book(s)?

    How far have you gotten?

    What you've gotten out of it?

    Anything else?

    Thanks,
    Lance
     
  17. TonyV

    TonyV Member

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    Yes I am using them. Starting with the Fanatics Guide to Ear Training book.

    It is pretty much standard ear training, I took a course at NGW once and the instructor taught similarly.

    He plays the I, IV, V chord of a key then lets the I ring and your job is to learn the sound of different tones relative to that key. You go through all 12 keys. You start out one note at a time, he recommends the order of adding tones. So for example you learn the sound of the maj 3rd in 12 keys one week then the 2nd the next week, working through all twleve tones in twleve keys.

    You then proceed to two notes in succession and then four note lines etc. (that is where you start getting into the other books)

    It has definately helped me improve, probably what helped me most is just having a structured program gets me to stick with it more.
     
  18. EricT

    EricT Member

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    Yes, that's how it's like for me too. When you have lessons to follow and a structured program it's a lot easier to get better. Being a student, I'm used to homework and tests, and I that's how I learn the best.

    Lately I've been too busy, but after Christmas I'm putting half an hour with ear training on my schedule each day.
     
  19. KRosser

    KRosser Member

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    I used to do lots of ear training in the car with nothing but a chromatic pitch pipe (a whopping $12 investment). I would randomly play a pitch (remember to keep your eyes on the road!) and then practice singing an interval above it or below it. (More on this in the paragraph below). I also practiced randomly playing a pitch and then singing a major triad with the played note as the root, then minor, augmented and diminished triads, then I would practice the same thing with the played pitch being the third, and then the fifth. Then I moved onto seventh chords in a similar manner.

    As far as finding your intervals up & down, I highly recommend a method that worked great for me, which is finding a song that has a given interval as the first two notes of the melody. For instance, an ascending diminished fifth for me was "Maria" from West Side Story, and a descending minor third was "Hey Jude". It's more important that you come up with your own song references, though, because they need to be something you can access from your memory banks easily. Once I came up with a song for every ascending and descending interval up to (and including) an octave, I would just drill them accordingly with the pitch pipe in the car (I was doing a lot of tedious driving at the time).

    I also did lots of fun stuff singing rhythms against a metronome in the car, but that'll have to be for another post....
     
  20. lhallam

    lhallam Member

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    You are correct, being able to sing the chord or interval is the best way of getting intervals/chords into your ear.

    This is a great idea for someone with knowledge and an established ear but I have to question this approach for the raw beginner.

    A small point is accuracy & thoroughness in proper spelling. For example, a major third above D# is F double sharp (enharmonic G). Without proper guidance, folks would tend to name the pitch correctly (G) but not the theoretic correct note (F ##). Plus how often do you play a G and say to yourself, sing a major third below F double sharp?

    To some I may be nit-picking about the spellings however my professor would take off points if you sang the right interval but named the wrong note.

    I know plenty of people use the song association approach to learning intervals but I find it better to simply know the sound of a Major 3rd immediately than to hear it, then associate it with a song, then name the interval. The association method has been a crutch for me on some intervals.
     

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