Ear Training

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by blissop, Feb 19, 2015.

  1. blissop

    blissop Member

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    Okay, so I've been learning out of this ear training book from musicians institute and I've had difficulties with the section i'm at and was if anyone could help me out. I'm at the part where it tells me to sing the major scale without accompaniment and to check if i stayed on pitch at the octave. Im usually off a bit and after the major scale it goes on to major melodies without accompaniment. When I sing with accompaniment i'm spot on.. any tips for this or just any advice with ear training in general? Thanks.
     
  2. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    It's ongoing. Do you ever transcribe( listen and write down)? That is excellent ear-training too.
     
  3. treedroppings

    treedroppings Member

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    Get a cheap tuner and practice those TV jingles as bar chords . I learned a couple of carpet store commercials using just the e barre chords.
     
  4. kimock

    kimock Member

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    Sharp or flat?
    Are you in a good range?
     
  5. KRosser

    KRosser Member

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    Start simpler - Just try to get the Maj 2nd in tune first, then add an interval at a time until you're getting the octave.
     
  6. dingusmingus

    dingusmingus Member

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    It's a slow process, especially for folks like me who start out with a shaky sense of pitch. It does improve with lots of practice. I try to sing all the time to myself, like when I commute. I'm not at all where I'd like to be, but it's definitely improved with about two years of work.
     
  7. blissop

    blissop Member

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    I definitely wanna start transcribing again. I kinda gave up doing it because i couldnt really hear or figure out the bassline etc and also just how to go about it in general. This lead me to think i needed to improve my ears and thats when i bought the ear training book. I probably just started with songs that were too difficult. Any suggestion for songs?

    I just started singing when i begun learning from the book. The book started with matching pitch with your instrument and i can do this decently. My problem is when im singing without an instrument. I guess just havent internalized the intervals yet.

    I remember that song lol ill take another listen. Thanks!
     
  8. amstrtatnut

    amstrtatnut Member

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    I think you are doing well. I rarely practice singing unacompanied. If you need a piano or guitar for now I would not sweat it at all.

    I dont know if it was a shortcoming but, in music school I was never asked to sing an ear training exercise unaccompanied. I could see how it would be a great skill for a "technical singer", but for the average musician I dont know. Ive always been able to sing do re mi.

    Funny thing about music. You can use it to help remember stuff. So the idea of exercises that take music out of context and expect you to remember seems odd to me.

    Thats my way of saying I would try to learn actual songs I like. Sing those a capella when I want to test my ear chops.

    My .02

    Stick with it. Ear training is totally worth it.
     
  9. stevel

    stevel Member

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    This.

    I'll also add that it becomes important to find the "tonal guideposts" of the Tonic, Major 3rd, 5th, and Octave.


    Patterns like:

    Do - Re - Do - Mi - Do - Fa - Do - So... etc. are good for using the Tonic (Do) as "home base".

    It's also important to get patterns like:

    Do - Mi - Do

    Do - So - Do

    Do - do (8ve) - Do

    in your ear, as well as the triad:

    Do - Mi - So - Mi - Do

    It's also not a bad idea to work on some things below the tonic as often times melodies will have notes both above and below the tonic, not just above.

    We used to always have to sing Do - Mi - So - Mi - Do - SO (below) - Do to get the key in our head in sight-singing class.

    "Somewhere Over The Rainbow" is a great song to work on eventually because it hits on every note of the scale with some jumps up to 8ve, then the 6, etc. But it gives you a way to use those "tonal guideposts".

    Also, most teachers teach you some songs that have specific intervals in them but what they don't teach you is the tonal aspect of it that makes it easier (like it's more likely you'll hear a Major 6 interval up when singing from SO up to Mi above, as opposed to Do to La, which is in general much rarer, and it's important to get those "SO - Do" and "SO - Mi" patterns - same thing with the tritone - it's more important to understand the relationship between Ti and Fa as scale degrees 7 and 4 and how they relate to 1 and 3, and how they're part of a V7 harmony - singing Do to "Fi" doesn't really teach you in quite the same way).
     
  10. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    Here is a simple ear training exercise: play any note, in any octave, and match the pitch with your voice. If it is out your vocal range sing it in any octave that is comfortable.
    Being able to match notes is fundamental.
     
  11. blissop

    blissop Member

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    Thanks for the tips. Appreciate it. I think i just need to take it a bit slower and focus on each scale degree and how it relates to the key.
     
  12. chill

    chill Member

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    Hey Blissop!

    Could you answer these questions? I am very interested in reading what Steve has to say about this. He is THE person when it comes to music and the ear.
     
  13. frdagaa

    frdagaa Supporting Member

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    Channel the Sound of Music. Become Julie Andrews. "Do a deer, a female deer, Re a drop of golden sun ...." Sing it in the shower every day for the next year. Occasionally do it with an instrument (out of the shower) to check your pitch.

    IMO every musician needs to be able to do stuff like the major scale on pitch without accompaniment
     
  14. blissop

    blissop Member

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    I'm usually a bit flat and Ive found a good range for my vocals.
     
  15. blissop

    blissop Member

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    hahaha Heck of a tune! Im definitely gonna work on this. Thanks :)
     
  16. Phletch

    Phletch Member

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    On top of Julie Andrews...err, wait...becoming Julie Andrews, don't forget "Row, Row, Row Your Boat" and "Mary Had a Little Lam" (the kids' song, not SRV). They fit right in with the do re mi stuff.
     

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