Easiest way to change caps in a 335 ??

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by frankiestarr, Feb 22, 2012.

  1. frankiestarr

    frankiestarr Supporting Member

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    I have always been intimidated with swapping electronics in my 335....I need to swap caps, and am hoping it's do-able without anything to difficult.....Thanks

    PS it's a 81 re-issue if it matters....
     
  2. dspellman

    dspellman Senior Member

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    Have Gibson build you a Custom shop guitar with the right ones in the first place <G>
     
  3. 335guy

    335guy Member

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    Fishing around through those F-holes is never easy. One of the hardest guitars to work on.
     
  4. direwolf

    direwolf Supporting Member

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    Easy, tie dental floss to the pots. Pull the works thru the neck pup hole. Use the floss to pull it all back into place.
     
  5. Caribou

    Caribou Silver Supporting Member

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    You have to pull the wiring harness to solder the caps. I wouldn't call it easy, but if you're determined enough you can get through it. Dental floss worked best for me as described above. And patience-- a lot of it.
     
  6. Drewski

    Drewski Supporting Member

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    I use spectra fishing line. Like was mentioned above tie it to all your pots and jack then remove them and pull them back...
     
  7. Turbozag

    Turbozag Senior Member

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    Here ya go...

    Part 1 of 5

     
  8. tjmicsak

    tjmicsak Member

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    Well.... you did say "easiest"....

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Peteyvee

    Peteyvee Premium Platinum Member

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    I'd pay someone qualified to do it. IMO: PITA doesn't begin to describe it even with dental floss.
     
  10. chrisjnyc

    chrisjnyc Member

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    Yea, floss can break off pretty easily. I would use a show lace or something like fishing line.
     
  11. vortexxxx

    vortexxxx Member

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    I know some pro repairers that have spent hours doing that on one guitar. It's not for the timid.
     
  12. Seegs

    Seegs Member

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    I would invest in a wiring harness as it is all preformed and cut to the right size...

    Removing your old electronics and trying to get them back in is a recipe for disaster...with a premade harness it slips right in...

    My first attempt with a 335 took me 7 hours without a harness...

    With a BCS harness it took me 20 minutes in my 339...

    Chow,
    Seegs
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2012
  13. cowboytim

    cowboytim Member

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    Changed as per video....using clear plastic tubing...and this was VERY easy way to do the job........I used R&S Super pots...Gray Tiger Caps.
    I bought mine "Pre-wired" by Billy at R&S....just pull them through the F holes in my case. But you may get yours though the pick-up cavity.
     
  14. supa-fuzz

    supa-fuzz Member

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    First and foremost is set aside a block of time where you won't be rushed, pulling and replacing a 335 harness requires alot of patience. I use a nylon braided fishing line for this task, good luck!
     
  15. Dillow4092

    Dillow4092 Member

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    Not an easy job to be sure. It can be VERY frustrating, and time consuming. If you don't have the time/patience/experience do yourself a favor and take it to a competent tech.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2012
  16. I'm Incinerator

    I'm Incinerator Supporting Member

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    aye!

    TV Jones uses and recommends the clear tubing method on Gretsch guitars. I can't imagine trying this kind of work myself!
     
  17. tartanphantom

    tartanphantom Member

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    As a very experienced tinkerer of Gretsch guitars, I have to say that dental floss, fishing line, shoe laces, thread, etc.... they all BLOW.

    The plastic tubing method is by far the easiest of any of them-- still somewhat time consuming due to the nature of the guitars, but much easier than dealing with a mess of threads & strings, which, by the way, have a tendency to get caught on other components inside the guitar.

    Of course, the EASIEST method is to pay someone else to deal with it.
     
  18. stilesg57

    stilesg57 Member

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    I'm not looking forward to this, but I've got to swap all the electronics out of my Ibanez 335 clone soon. And I can't use the floss or tubing tricks because I've got to drill the holes larger to accept the new CTS pots (currently has stock little import pots).
     
  19. tartanphantom

    tartanphantom Member

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    You can still use the tubing trick. You need to pull the whole harness anyway. just unscrew the pot nuts and let the old components fall into the body, remove the whole shebang through the pickup holes, re-size your pot holes, insert the tubing into the pot holes, pull it through to the pickup cavities, and then attach it to the new pots/harness and pull it all back into place (be sure to put on the internal lockwasher first). It's good to have about 18 inches of tube length for each pot and the switch. for the jack, I use a plastic wall anchor, insert it into the jack, insert a screw into the anchor to expand it enough to securely hold the jack, and just push the tubing over the screw head.

    Once you have each component in place, just drop the outer washers and the nuts into place down the length of the tubing. Sometimes, you may get tubing that is too big for the nut to slip over. What I do is buy tubing slightly smaller than the pot shaft, and then heat it with a hair dryer-- it becomes very soft and flexible when heated-- this allows me to slip it over the pot shaft easier. As it cools, it shrinks and clamps down on the shaft, ensuring a good grip. It's easier than you think.
     
  20. cherrick

    cherrick Member

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    turn the guitar over. cut a hole in the back underneath the controls and install a plastic cover plate when you're done.
     

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