EBMM BFRs Dropped Today - 80s Superstrat Style

poppunk

Member
Messages
600
While I am a EBMM fan this BFR offering does anything for me, especially the Cutlass offering. I do agree with the comments on price, way too high. EBMM has been pricing themselves out of the market recently.

When the Stingray and Cutlass hit the market 5/6 years ago they were priced very affordable but have been climbing rapidly up and the BFR's can be cool though always over priced
The BFRs are really meant for a small group of fans, and the 250 they make every couple of months for those runs probably aren't much in terms of revenue for them, they're probably helping get more people to buy the regular versions.

I have two pre-2018 StingRays (non-RS) that I got used. I'd like one of the roasted maple ones to swap out for one of the regular ones I have (the RS was the first one I played and was blown away by playability, the satin finish on the pre-RS necks is still really good).

I don't know if they're really pricing themselves out, especially in a recent sense. Since everybody is shelling out massive cash for instruments so far this year, they've probably had a record year. I really want both the Mike Herrera MxPx StingRay bass and the Stephen Egerton StingRay guitar, but they're sort of limited runs of things I already have and are $2,500. I'm not going to end up with either, as I've never paid more than $1,200 for an instrument.
 

poppunk

Member
Messages
600
I've felt for a long time now, and even more so since they've raised their prices, that they are extremely overrated and remind me of imitators. It seems to me they want the respect and admiration so badly that other guitar manufacturers get such as Suhr, Tom Anderson, PRS, ....just to name a few, yet they fall short in so many areas. Straight-up wannabes...that’s how I take them. They have some nice quality aspects to their products, but as a whole, they either fall short in their concepts or just simply can't compete with the builds of the companies I’ve already mentioned.

If people dig them, more power to them. I’ve owned many of their guitars myself in the past, and was always underwhelmed in the end and sometimes just plain disappointed. I think it stems from their leadership. Either way, I just believe their prices are incredibly inflated.
I don't get some of what you're saying here. I don't think there's a lack of "respect" for EBMM, usually the big criticisms I see about their guitars is that the nut width is almost always narrow and they're expensive. I get the expensive part, and the neck dimensions are about personal preference. I used to not like them either until I played a StingRay guitar. I still don't like pretty much any other model but the SR guitar is awesome for me.

The comparison to builders like Suhr or Anderson is weird. Both those builders make high-quality rebuilds of mostly Fender (and then sorta LP) designs with the superstrat style thrown in. EBMM has their superstrat types, but then some really weird guitars thrown in. That's actually how I think of EBMM in guitars: they tend to make weird ones and fit niches that other US builders don't. I don't like the Majesty at all, but it's an absolutely insane guitar in terms of implementing newer features and just being weird. Those comparable Suhr or Andersons can cost $1,000+ more than the EBMMs. A new Cutlass RS is "only" $2,100. If you're not getting a percieved massive upgrade when you pay that Suhr or Anderson price even over the EBMM price, something is wrong.

The PRS comparison makes more sense. PRS is still bigger but both these builders are more production type builders than Suhr or Anderson. The Silver Sky and Cutlass are in the same price range. I think both companies make awesome guitars, it just comes down to preference. Legit US PRS guitars aren't cheap either.

The other thing about EBMM is guitar players often forget they make the third most common bass guitar, which is actually the thing from EBMM I've really loved for a couple decades. If they ever make a StingRay Special with matching headstocks (not a crazy BFR thing), I might actually spend new money coin on it. I haven't bought a new instrument since 2002.

The thing is, EBMM have a small but extremely loyal group of repeat customers who will probably buy at this price. I don't think I've seen this to the same extent with any brand the size of EBMM or smaller.

Check the EBMM forums and you'll see people have like 10+ JP6/Majesties etc.

As for me? I wish I was part of that group :)
It definitely gets a little cult-ish with some of those people, but the same can be said for other brands. Although the EBMM people tend to not even dabble outside of the EBMM much.

I dont buy Guitars with Floyds.
This is the way.
 

BuckshotJenkins

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
765
Widen the nut like the new Sabres and offer a few “less loud” colors, and I’d be quite interested...although I would like that yellow one already.
 

John C

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,931
The BFRs are really meant for a small group of fans, and the 250 they make every couple of months for those runs probably aren't much in terms of revenue for them, they're probably helping get more people to buy the regular versions.

I have two pre-2018 StingRays (non-RS) that I got used. I'd like one of the roasted maple ones to swap out for one of the regular ones I have (the RS was the first one I played and was blown away by playability, the satin finish on the pre-RS necks is still really good).

I don't know if they're really pricing themselves out, especially in a recent sense. Since everybody is shelling out massive cash for instruments so far this year, they've probably had a record year. I really want both the Mike Herrera MxPx StingRay bass and the Stephen Egerton StingRay guitar, but they're sort of limited runs of things I already have and are $2,500. I'm not going to end up with either, as I've never paid more than $1,200 for an instrument.
Agreed on the BFRs - they are very small production numbers. For example in this run they are doing:
  • 40 of the Cutlass Floyd Rose in Lime
  • 35 of the Cutlass Floyd Rose in Lemon
  • 50 of the JP
  • 40 of the Mariposa
  • 60 of the Bongo bass
Pricing on these is for the collector's market.

As mentioned the 2020 Cutlass RS $2,150 MAP for most colors (the HSS is $50 more) - that's $250 more than a Fender American Ultra for most colors, but you net the roasted maple neck and SS frets. When the Cutlass and StingRay first came out in 2016 (pre-roasted neck) they were $100 or so less than the then-new American Elite series.
 

'63-Strat

Member
Messages
197
Dear Abby:

I consider myself to be a modestly conventional blues jamming single coil strat lover. I've only ever owned the one strat and I always thought that was enough for me. A nice sunburst is plenty stylish, yesirree.

But after looking at these BFRs, I began to feel uncomfortable urges. That green one makes me feel kind of funny in a way that I haven't since a young lad. I keep looking at my strat and thought to myself: what would it look like with pyramids instead of dot fret markers. Could I love a Floyd Rose? Should I take a router to it and carve out a grip hole?

Then last night my wife caught me in the basement huddled over a copy of Guitar Player from 1993, playing long sensuous solo lines in Locrian mode. I was ashamed but I agreed to therapy.

My counselor thinks I may be Vai-curious. What should I do?

Signed,
Angstwulf
Do you mean Lydian?
 

Angstwulf

Member
Messages
880
Do you mean Lydian?
I mean I have to stop posting stupid stuff while waiting to pick up my kids from school. :bonk

BTW: I kinda like these. They remind me of Fender’s attempt at their own superstrats in the 80’s.

This really is idle talk but if I ever seriously wanted one it would be an EBMM of some persuasion or an Ibanez, probably a Satch. He’s Vai for us non-fancy, follicle challenged types.
 




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