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Ebo Customs e-verb?

tinkercity

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,806
Hey y’all,
I been interested in a E Verb for a while now. I am leaning towards the regular version. How does it handle being put in an effects loop? Is it good with line level signal?
I'm sure it would be great in those circumstances. It has the ability to go full wet, so it can used in an insert. Not sure about the line level usage on the stage version... maybe @flantrax could chime in with experiences? I think he's used it in that scenario. I do know the studio version has balanced and unbalanced inputs and seems to be suited for line level. It also has a custom transformer.

I would assume the regular one would be good with most signals since the preamp control works so well.
 

flantrax

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,207
I'm sure it would be great in those circumstances. It has the ability to go full wet, so it can used in an insert. Not sure about the line level usage on the stage version... maybe @flantrax could chime in with experiences? I think he's used it in that scenario. I do know the studio version has balanced and unbalanced inputs and seems to be suited for line level. It also has a custom transformer.

I would assume the regular one would be good with most signals since the preamp control works so well.
I have the non studio version and I‘ve only used mine in front of the amp or on an aux effects buss in the studio. Works great for both. I imagine it will work in an amp fx loop. Probably depends on the loop but if yours has any type of level control and it’s serial it should be good to go. I can try mine in a couple amp looks over the weekend and report back.

Also, EBO(Eric) is super helpful and will answer any questions.
 

leonelh7

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
645
I'm sure it would be great in those circumstances. It has the ability to go full wet, so it can used in an insert. Not sure about the line level usage on the stage version... maybe @flantrax could chime in with experiences? I think he's used it in that scenario. I do know the studio version has balanced and unbalanced inputs and seems to be suited for line level. It also has a custom transformer.

I would assume the regular one would be good with most signals since the preamp control works so well.
I have the non studio version and I‘ve only used mine in front of the amp or on an aux effects buss in the studio. Works great for both. I imagine it will work in an amp fx loop. Probably depends on the loop but if yours has any type of level control and it’s serial it should be good to go. I can try mine in a couple amp looks over the weekend and report back.

Also, EBO(Eric) is super helpful and will answer any questions.
I think I may get the regular version for now and a studio version down the road.
 

KennyM

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,943
I’ve been using the E-Verb for a few months now. Besides being a phenomenal sounding verb, I think the best thing I could say about it IMO, is that I’ve long stopped noticing it as any sort of effect - it’s simply an inseparable part of my amp sound equation. Every amp.

I technically have the same reverb in my Del Rio however the E-Verb in front of the amp, even the Del Rio, forms a more connected and solidified guitar/amp sound. It’s just killer!
 

donfrantz

Yo! You stealin’ all the cool.
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,447
Yeah--I thought about the Del Rio too, but decided I wanted verb in front of my other amps possible too, so went with an E-verb and a Rockshow. It's really fantastic!
 

leonelh7

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
645
Yeah--I thought about the Del Rio too, but decided I wanted verb in front of my other amps possible too, so went with an E-verb and a Rockshow. It's really fantastic!
How does the reverb react when the amp is providing all the distortion? I had a reverb that as soon as I hit the lead channel in my amp, the reverb would go nuts. I mostly use single channel amps now but occasionally I would use a two channel setup.
 

BobChuck

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
546
How does the reverb react when the amp is providing all the distortion? I had a reverb that as soon as I hit the lead channel in my amp, the reverb would go nuts. I mostly use single channel amps now but occasionally I would use a two channel setup.
It will be the same with this unit.

With four knobs, you can make it sound great no matter what (Clean or Distortion)... but you won't get the flexibility of a midi rig for example.

If you set the reverb for your clean channel, forget your gain channel.
If you set the reverb for your gain channel, forget your clean channel.
Either way, you will have to compromise. For one, the other or in between.

I love mine BTW.
 

leonelh7

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
645
It will be the same with this unit.

With four knobs, you can make it sound great no matter what (Clean or Distortion)... but you won't get the flexibility of a midi rig for example.

If you set the reverb for your clean channel, forget your gain channel.
If you set the reverb for your gain channel, forget your clean channel.
Either way, you will have to compromise. For one, the other or in between.

I love mine BTW.
I play edge of breakup tones so maybe I can find a in between setting. Thanks for the info.
 

tinkercity

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,806
It will be the same with this unit.

With four knobs, you can make it sound great no matter what (Clean or Distortion)... but you won't get the flexibility of a midi rig for example.

If you set the reverb for your clean channel, forget your gain channel.
If you set the reverb for your gain channel, forget your clean channel.
Either way, you will have to compromise. For one, the other or in between.

I love mine BTW.
While this is true if you have a gonzo drip reverb setting or something very high on the mix of the EBO, it's actually not the case for the most part for me. With the E-Verb set like a normal good sounding reverb, it sounds amazing into a clean amp or a dirty amp. For reference, I've used it with vintage Marshalls, Tweeds, Matchless, Two Rocks and the Ebo Rockshow I own.

Eric Borash is a vintage amp and more notable a Marshall guy - he does a ton of work on these amps along with his own circuits, so the E-Verb is voiced to interact much more pleasingly and more useful across the board with all amps.

If you're trying to put a big verb setting into a Dual Rectifier --- that's another story. But most of the applications you'd want a spring/plate verb are going to sound great. It does NOT act like a reverb pedal in front of an amp.
 

leonelh7

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
645
While this is true if you have a gonzo drip reverb setting or something very high on the mix of the EBO, it's actually not the case for the most part for me. With the E-Verb set like a normal good sounding reverb, it sounds amazing into a clean amp or a dirty amp. For reference, I've used it with vintage Marshalls, Tweeds, Matchless, Two Rocks and the Ebo Rockshow I own.

Eric Borash is a vintage amp and more notable a Marshall guy - he does a ton of work on these amps along with his own circuits, so the E-Verb is voiced to interact much more pleasingly and more useful across the board with all amps.

If you're trying to put a big verb setting into a Dual Rectifier --- that's another story. But most of the applications you'd want a spring/plate verb are going to sound great. It does NOT act like a reverb pedal in front of an amp.
Fenders and Marshall’s are what I mostly use. Usually my amps are set to the edge of breakup, if not past breakup and I use my volume knob and tone to get different sounds, including clean. That’s why I think this reverb should work for my needs.
 

BobChuck

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
546
While this is true if you have a gonzo drip reverb setting or something very high on the mix of the EBO, it's actually not the case for the most part for me. With the E-Verb set like a normal good sounding reverb, it sounds amazing into a clean amp or a dirty amp. For reference, I've used it with vintage Marshalls, Tweeds, Matchless, Two Rocks and the Ebo Rockshow I own.

Eric Borash is a vintage amp and more notable a Marshall guy - he does a ton of work on these amps along with his own circuits, so the E-Verb is voiced to interact much more pleasingly and more useful across the board with all amps.

If you're trying to put a big verb setting into a Dual Rectifier --- that's another story. But most of the applications you'd want a spring/plate verb are going to sound great. It does NOT act like a reverb pedal in front of an amp.
Vintage Marshall, Tweed, Matchless or Rockshow are single channel amp, not switcher.

So..

Are you telling me that if you have a vintage Marshall, cranked (distortion from amp), then you set your E-Verb...
You won't have to change the setting on the E-Verb if you turn down the volume on the Marshall????
If that is the case, you are using the "in between" setting I was referring to.
 

tinkercity

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,806
Fenders and Marshall’s are what I mostly use. Usually my amps are set to the edge of breakup, if not past breakup and I use my volume knob and tone to get different sounds, including clean. That’s why I think this reverb should work for my needs.
Yeah, you'll get on great with the E-Verb :)

Vintage Marshall, Tweed, Matchless or Rockshow are single channel amp, not switcher.

So..

Are you telling me that if you have a vintage Marshall, cranked (distortion from amp), then you set your E-Verb...
You won't have to change the setting on the E-Verb if you turn down the volume on the Marshall????
If that is the case, you are using the "in between" setting I was referring to.
I'm not arguing that if you've got a channel switcher high gain kind of amp that you'll have to change settings. I mean, you may want to change settings regardless for parts in sessions, parts in songs etc... Of course if any amplifier you have is dimed and fully distorting you're going to have to adjust accordingly. Your original post however suggested that the E-Verb wouldn't work that well with one setting and I just don't find that to be true.

Like @KennyM mentioned above, the E-Verb becomes more of a part of your rig rather than being an effect. The pre-amp and the reverb itself really merge with the whole rig to make something unique, engaging and addictive. It's become one of the most important pieces of my studio by far.
 

KennyM

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,943
How does the reverb react when the amp is providing all the distortion? I had a reverb that as soon as I hit the lead channel in my amp, the reverb would go nuts. I mostly use single channel amps now but occasionally I would use a two channel setup.
I dial back the verb and delay when switching from my Bassman to an opened up Plexi. I still often like a hint of it in there even when the Marshall is cooking but generally prefer the grease post. That said, I really like the sound running through the E Verb in idle into a distorted amp. It still adds something.

So..
Are you telling me that if you have a vintage Marshall, cranked (distortion from amp), then you set your E-Verb...
You won't have to change the setting on the E-Verb if you turn down the volume on the Marshall????
If that is the case, you are using the "in between" setting I was referring to.
You probably need to change your bass or treble or any of several settings with drastic amp distortion changes so no reason you wouldn't expect to do so with any reverb or delay. I don't tend to use as much delay or verb on dirty sounds even post when I mix. A little goes a long way with the exception of leads and melodies.

I only really record so one reason I do like a touch of Verb on the amp is that it gives a little depth in the track exactly pinpointed to where the guitar is panned and sits in the mix. It's stuck to the sound wherever you place it. I use the post effects to give that track some space and width.
 

BobChuck

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
546
You probably need to change your bass or treble or any of several settings with drastic amp distortion changes so no reason you wouldn't expect to do so with any reverb or delay. I don't tend to use as much delay or verb on dirty sounds even post when I mix. A little goes a long way with the exception of leads and melodies.

I only really record so one reason I do like a touch of Verb on the amp is that it gives a little depth in the track exactly pinpointed to where the guitar is panned and sits in the mix. It's stuck to the sound wherever you place it. I use the post effects to give that track some space and width.
I agree, totally. Leonelh7 was asking about the E-Verb and his previous experience with another reverb unit.
I wanted to confirm that the E-Verb will behave the same way within the same circumstance he described.

How does the reverb react when the amp is providing all the distortion? I had a reverb that as soon as I hit the lead channel in my amp, the reverb would go nuts. I mostly use single channel amps now but occasionally I would use a two channel setup.
 

leonelh7

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
645
I have a question. How different is the reverb from a Fender Reverb tank? If it is night and day, what makes it different?
 

donfrantz

Yo! You stealin’ all the cool.
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,447
Power--one JJ 6V6 other one is hard to see (Rectifier?) two JJECC83S for preamp.
 






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