Educate me, why is Clapton considered one of the greatest?

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by dende, Apr 4, 2019.

  1. telelion

    telelion Member

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    The only session player in the entire history of the Beatles, of course other than George Martin, was the mystery guitar player on "While My Guitar Gently Weeps." It was Eric Clapton. Why? Because at that time, no guitar player was capable of delivering what the song needed, obviously according to George Harrison. That was a great distorted tone, lyrical string bending guitar with Clapton's signature vibrato. Sure, anyone can play it now. Then it was revolutionary.
     
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  2. guitargeezer

    guitargeezer Silver Supporting Member

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    I wasn’t asking for clarification of your comment, I meant that my comment was off the subject of this thread. Sorry I wasn’t more specific.
     
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  3. John 14:6

    John 14:6 Member

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    Because the British kids who were REALLY getting into American blues music during the mid 60's had never heard anything like Clapton live with his Les Paul/Marshall rig. Many will disagree, but Clapton took guys like Freddie King to the next level. Both Clapton and Peter Green were in their own league when it came to the being the apex of the next generation of American blues guitarists at the time.....And they were not even American. They caused America to finally give the now classic blues players the recognition they deserved. Those guys were still in their prime at the time. B.B. King had not even done Live At The Regal.
     
  4. Michael Lapp

    Michael Lapp Guest

    You know you are right about that. I do like Bonamassa and do a couple covers, Sloe Gin and Mountain Time. He reminds me more of Jeff Beck than Clapton but either way you are right. The problem with the guys today’s is they are industrial, I mean they are really managed unlike what we saw in th day’s of old. What ever happened to someone trashing a hotel room. Where is Jimmy Page now!
     
  5. eddie101

    eddie101 Silver Supporting Member

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    I love K Richards' and his playing, and one of the reasons why I got a tele in the first place.

    Having said that, you must be kidding me. Keith is Keith, and he's great but he's not god.
     
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  6. Rockledge

    Rockledge Member

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    There was no luck involved in Mr Clapton being chosen by John Mayall for the Bluesbreakers, other than perhaps the fact God placed them in the same general geographical location.
    John Mayall didn't pick Clapton just because he happened to be there, Mr Mayall always had the best of the best. He would seek out and find who were the best blues players for his bands, that is why so many of the musicians he chose over the years became famous in their own light.
    Fleetwood Mac, Larry Taylor, Mick Taylor, Coco Montoya, Jack Bruce, Andy Fraser, Aynsley Dunbar, Hughie Flint, Harvey Mandel, and God knows who else in music royalty played with Mayall. If you was a great musician in Britian in the 60s or 70s, John Mayall would find you. He didn't just stumble on these fellows.
    None of them got into that band because of luck.
    Clapton got the job for one reason. Because he is GOOD.
     
  7. DiPa

    DiPa Constant GAS Silver Supporting Member

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    We had a great birth of the blues culture on our USA shores and people here didn’t even know it or want to get involved, it was primarily black men and of course those were times of segregation, it took the British to tell us what we had and how great it was. Thank you Clapton and the Stones and so many other British artists that opened our eyes in America.
     
  8. StummerJoe

    StummerJoe Member

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    :beer
     
  9. GulfportBound

    GulfportBound Member

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    It didn't hurt Eric Clapton, either, that Mayall was extremely impressed by his playing on this B-side . . .

     
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  10. Rockledge

    Rockledge Member

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    From what I have been able to gather and conjecture about the whole situation, it was Clapton joining John Mayall that propelled Mr Mayall into wide recognition.
    So much so that the Beano album wasn't just John Mayall and the Blues Breakers.
    It was also billed "FEATURING" Eric Clapton. Which was unheard of at the time, a recognized act adding a guitarists name to the billing. Mr Mayall and Mr Clapton, it would seem, propelled each other into the big time.


    Which brings back a memory. My brst friend, who I have been friends with since were were in grade school, just died a few weeks ago.
    I remember the day him and I walked about 10 miles to go to the mall ( which, at the time malls were a brand new thing and were nothing like what are known as malls now) and went to a store called Recordland.
    I remember this guy who was probably about 35 years old at the time who worked there, he knew I liked guitar stuff and was raving to me about this blues guy John Mayall and this hot new guitarist that was playing with him. I remember him showing me the one copy of the album he had. It was the Beano album. I didn't get the album then, my album money for the month had already been spent, but I did get it at some point in time.
    But I remember that day like it was yesterday, this guy raving about that album.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2019
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  11. Blingdogg

    Blingdogg Member

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    I found this clip a while ago and never tire of it. It's the best cover I've ever heard. She plays those solos so beautifully; I honestly like listening to this almost as much as Clapton's original haha.
     
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  12. DiPa

    DiPa Constant GAS Silver Supporting Member

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    Wasn’t Eric the one who asked to add his name explicitly? I think I read it somewhere. Agreed, he propelled that album as well as John M.
     
  13. DiPa

    DiPa Constant GAS Silver Supporting Member

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    Yeah and the other clip of the young boy playing it actually I liked a bit more, the one Husk posted above. The kid nails it...
     
  14. McShred

    McShred Supporting Member

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    You really have to appreciate how lame guitar paying was prior to Clapton's Beano record. There just wasn't anybody really cutting loose. By todays standards it seems pretty tame, but back then, it was en fuego. Claptons impact is further confused by the fact that he pretty much quit playing like that after a few years and morphed into this white bluesman thing.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2019
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  15. Tom CT

    Tom CT Old Supporting Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Ah, yes. The music = sports mentality where one guitarist just has to be better than another. :rolleyes:
     
  16. Rockledge

    Rockledge Member

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    If I am not mistaken that album was on Polydor, which I think was a British Label.
    Clapton had made such a stir playing live with Mayall that I am betting the label demanded it, as
    a marketing aid. Or perhaps Mr Mayall himself seen the wisdom of having that name on his album as it related to sales.
    I doubt Clapton would have asked, or had the clout at the time to have even dared to. You gotta figure, he was just a lad at the time.
    I think that was the album that inspired a huge interest in the blues among hippies in the states. It was after that album that bands like Canned Heat started popping up.
     
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  17. sharpshooter

    sharpshooter Member

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    Waded thru most of this thread,, I think that the quote above captures some of the real essence of ECs playing.
    Whether it be in a stadium, or sitting on the porch with friends and an acoustic, his playing has a "flow" to it,, he plays songs, with real melody.
     
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  18. GulfportBound

    GulfportBound Member

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    Even before Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton, Mayall was giving Clapton featured co-billing on record (cut before Clapton took a hiatus and then returned to the Mayall group):

     
  19. GulfportBound

    GulfportBound Member

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    I'm afraid they and Mayall/Clapton were beaten to that punch by . . .

     
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  20. Hefalump

    Hefalump Member

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    He is a bit better than me. That is all I got.
     

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