Envelope filter pedal vs wah pedal

stbhorn

Member
Messages
201
I've never used a envelope filter pedal before, was thinking about getting one . . I currently have a cry baby wah . . . Do they sound much different?
 

rte1023

Member
Messages
762
Yeah they are definitely different although similar. I just picked up a DOD 440 and it is awesome.

I think of Phaser, Envelope Filter, and Wah as being along a line. Phaser will just be going through it's sweeps no matter what you play. Wah is tied to the expression of your foot so it gives you the most control. Envelope filter is somewhere between the two and is based on your playing dynamics. So if you play hard it will "wah" to the higher frequency and if you play soft it stays in the lower. It's great if you are playing more notes and/or a faster tempo, funk players like it so they don't break their ankles killing it on a wah. With that it's able to give that effect per each note whereas it may be hard or tiring to get the wah to be that active. But with auto wah you can't have that wild variable expression that a treadle has. So they're related but most definitely different capabilities.
 

wyatt

Member
Messages
4,170
Yes, listen to Fire on the Mountain by the Grateful Dead, then listen to Voodoo Chile.
That may not be the best example, This is an envelope filter as well...

But for the OP, what makes the EF unique is the envelope follower itself and how it responds to your playing. Plus, unlike a wah, it always starts the sweep in the same place and sweeps up (or down) for there with each note, giving a percussive effect. And, indeed, it is synonymous with Jerry Garcia, Bootsy Collins, etc.
 

jwny72

Member
Messages
2,796
They're different, though similar. One can get a filter to sound very much like a wah, or quite different. Filters can be very versatile. I have and use both. Get a good filter, you won't regret it.
 

rte1023

Member
Messages
762
The new DOD 440 I just picked up is super simple and sounds great. Paranoid Android by Radiohead is a great example of the vintage 440, but the new one is great at about $100. It has a down filter which I haven't quite figured out what kind of parts that could work with. I guess it's more of a bass player's effect.

The Q-tron is a readily available Mu Tron type of envelope filter although I've heard mixed reviews. And Earthquaker Devices has a new one called Spatial Delivery which sounds and looks awesome.
 

J_Stefanik

Member
Messages
862
That may not be the best example, This is an envelope filter as well...
Hendrix didn't use a filter, but I didn't think I needed to specify his version vs a cover band's. Good example though, putting that recording against the original, you can clearly hear the difference.
 

Dr.Lee

Member
Messages
1,669
I just picked up a WMD Super Fatman. I love the thing. Tons of flexibility and warm!
 

WeZ-84

Member
Messages
75
The Sonuus Wahoo can be used as a normal wah and it can be set up like an envelope filter so it will do both (and more)
 

SupremeDalek

Member
Messages
737
Shout out for the Keeley Neutrino. It's a very versatile envelope filter with a wide range of tonal options.

However, it can be tough to trigger with single coils unless the guitar is dimed. With humbuckers though... It's always awesome.
 




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