Eric Clapton: A Tale of Two Tones

Gallery

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So much raving about Beano tone. Clearly understandable, because it was groundshifting, then.
But my favourite Clapton tones are the Tweed sounds since From the Cradle (outstanding, underrated album).
ABSOLUTELY!!!

Although that wasn't one of the eras discussed in the video. In my opinion, 'From the Cradle' is the best tone, the best playing, and best reinterpretations of classic compositions, that Clapton recorded in his entire career. To me, it is the Apex of his journey and creative purpose in life of repacking the blues into his own form for expression.

If I could only have one Clapton album for the rest of my life it would be Cradle. Perhaps that's because I wasn't even alive until his solo career started, but I had already absorbed his whole catalog before Cradle was released. And it was still an awakening for me when I first heard it. Clearly others agree since it sold more than any other album he's played on.
 
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zwiefldraader

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870
ABSOLUTELY!!!

Although that wasn't one of the eras discussed in the video. In my opinion, 'From the Cradle' is the best tone, the best playing, and best reinterpretations of classic compositions, that Clapton recorded in his entire career. To me, it is the Apex of his journey and creative purpose in life of repacking the blues into his own form for expression.

If I could only have one Clapton album for the rest of my life it would be Cradle. Perhaps that's because I wasn't even alive until his solo career started, but I had already absorbed his whole catalog before Cradle was released. And it was still an awakening for me when I first heard it.
I AGREE WITH ALMOST EVERY WORD.
 

mdrake34

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Tony-Cliffton

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All covers, of course. All Your Love and Hideaway are the two standouts on the album; Clapton's Rambling on My Mind, for all his Robert Johnson idolatry, is rather tepid (excusable somewhat, given it was his first recorded vocal). Alternatively, one might suggest Stepping Out (another cover), but Clapton did the definitive live version of that when in Cream (as featured on Live Cream Vol. II). Of the originals, Mayall's Little Girl and Have You Heard are probably the best, again due to Clapton on the former and the horns on the latter. As such, the album really is quite a mixed batch: lacking Clapton's presence, it would hold somewhat little interest beyond being a time capsule documenting the musical translations (and aspirations) of mid '60s white British blues aficionados.
Yeah, so?
 

Dashface

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The 24 Nights tone is epic.

I think what makes it so genius is that it is instantly recognizable. Completely a moment of rock and roll tone, a beautiful peak of what a powerful and refined guitar can sound like.

Is that tone useful for much else these days? Probably not. But at that moment, at those shows - perfect :D



...This video is cool, but it does not sound like 24 Nights as mentioned by other posters. The chorus and the Lace Sensors are also totally key.
 

ufguy73

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4,556
The 24 Nights tone is epic.

I think what makes it so genius is that it is instantly recognizable. Completely a moment of rock and roll tone, a beautiful peak of what a powerful and refined guitar can sound like.

Is that tone useful for much else these days? Probably not. But at that moment, at those shows - perfect :D



...This video is cool, but it does not sound like 24 Nights as mentioned by other posters. The chorus and the Lace Sensors are also totally key.
it doesn’t hurt that EC almost seemed reborn in that era - the energy and fluidity of his playing in the late ‘80s to mid ‘90s was what i consider one of three particular peaks in his career (Cream era , Derek & Dominos era, Journeyman era).

i think its interesting that all three periods of his career that I am really drawn to feature three very distinctive tones and setups - maybe it IS really the fingers and phrasing, provided you have SOME sort of base tone that is appealing.
 
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Dashface

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I was hoping they would use the settings EC is said to have used on his SLO...

Eric Clapton used the following set-up for the Soldano SLO-100 during his mid-90s blues period:
Normal / Preamp: 8
Overdrive / Preamp: 3
Bass: 11
Middle: 11
Treble: 3
Normal Volume / Master: 10
Overdrive Volume / Master: 7
Presence: 4
Amp switches: Normal and Crunch
A foot pedal was used to switch between the normal and overdrive channels

source:https://www.whereseric.com/the-vaul...ptons-guitar-amp-and-equipment-set-historical
I’m pretty sure those settings would flatten a city block - might not work for YouTube :)
 

zwiefldraader

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BobbyRay

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I remember reading in Guitar Player Lee Dickson stating that 90% of From the Cradle was the Tweed Twin. He took the SLO on the road for that tour, but that album is not mostly SLO.

I love the SLO sound that Clapton had, but From the Cradle is almost all LoPo Tweed Twin.

Someone cited the saturation on Five Long Years. LoPo Tweed Twin, plus Clapton Strat puts you right there! No problem at all!
 




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