excercises are so boring.

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by rich2k4, May 28, 2008.

  1. rich2k4

    rich2k4 Supporting Member

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    how come no one ever recommend using songs to learn your techniques?

    right now i want to work on my alternate picking, so i am learning yngwie's far beyond the sun, and paul gilbert's technical difficulties.

    i use amazing slow downer to slow them down and then gradually get them up to speed.


    then when i want to work on.....lets say my sweep picking, all i do is pop in jason becker's altitudes into amazing slow downer, and learn that. it goes through every single common sweep pattern in both major minor and probably diminished, that is used by almost all guitarists.

    legato? why not learn some satriani tunes.

    sitting with a metronome and doing plain old exercises are severely boring to me, i don't have the patience.

    but, if i am able to practice licks from a song that utilize a special technique, and use amazing slow downer to be able to play along with the song, it makes it much more fun.
     
  2. giggedy

    giggedy Member

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    I actually love practicing, but that is good advice for those who don't.
     
  3. rich2k4

    rich2k4 Supporting Member

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    it's still practicing, only this time you are using passages in songs as your exercises.

    this will make you want to do them and make it more fun because, if you don't do them, you won't be able to play the song.
     
  4. dewey decibel

    dewey decibel Supporting Member

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    Ever read any of my posts? It's pretty much all I recommend... :rolleyes:



    Learn everything in context! Your technique should suit what you play, not what you play suiting your technique. Of course it can help to isolate and practice a specific passage over and over again and figure out the best way to play it, but drilling a scale or pattern over and over again is the wrong approach IMO.
     
  5. rich2k4

    rich2k4 Supporting Member

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  6. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    I spent too much time practicing drills instead of songs during my first stab at playing guitar. One time I was at a party where people were passing an acoustic around and playing songs on it. I was embarrased that I knew so few songs, despite the practice I put into scales, arps, etc.

    Since I took up guitar again nearly 2 years ago, my practice routine has been oriented around tunes and compositions. I'm making better progress and having more fun with the guitar as a result.

    I'll still turn to the "bitter medicine" drills to fix technical issues that I encounter (eg. open-string hybrid picking exercies) once in a while, but the emphasis is songs and compositions first.
     
  7. The Captain

    The Captain Supporting Member

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    I always reccomend utilising songs as teh means to develop skills, or "do exercises". I have been pretty heavily flamed for it too at times.
    There was a great editorial I read by Tom Kolb, where he talked about one day while he was at Berklee, his room-mate came in wiht a coule of guys and waatched him shred complex jazz scales for a while.
    Eventually his roomy asked "so, can you play a atune for the boys then'
    Ay that point, he figured he actually needed to learn some songs.
     
  8. jzucker

    jzucker Supporting Member

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    Depends on what your goals are. None of your heros got their chops just playing along with songs .
     
  9. matte

    matte Senior Member

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    get busy.
     
  10. GuitarsFromMars

    GuitarsFromMars Member

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    stop typing,play ur gitar...
     
  11. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    Would you recommend it over the Mel Bay version?
     
  12. matte

    matte Senior Member

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    i haven't seen the mel bay edition. fingerings are a very personal issue. i have a system that works for me that involves seeing the entire board in one position. i don't see this echoed in a lot of guitar-centric publications.
     
  13. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    Understood. Working out fingerings for myself as opposed to following someone else's fingerings (that work better for him/her than for me) why I plan to learn the Bach Cello Suite #1 Prelude via the arrangement in Suzuki Viola School vol. 5 (since I already own that book) instead of the Bach For Bass book. Standard notation also lends itself to experimenting with different fingerings.
     
  14. matte

    matte Senior Member

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    :BEER
     
  15. rich2k4

    rich2k4 Supporting Member

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    guthrie govan has.
     
  16. Ooogie

    Ooogie Member

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    Funny, I looked through his first book in a store the other day and it was pretty heavy on chord theory, scales, modes, technique (muting, vibrato, tapping...), exercises, etc.

    Mark
     
  17. jzucker

    jzucker Supporting Member

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    If that's true (and I doubt it is, even if he says so) he's the exception. The problem is that the musical gamut is very wide and you can't possibly find a solo to cover EVERY aspect of it. However, there are many paths to becoming a great player and I'm sure the one you're on is valid. I was just playing devil's advocate.
     
  18. rich2k4

    rich2k4 Supporting Member

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    well, he made those up himself because he knows a lot of his listeners go that route when they practice. although he himself didn't actually do it that way.

    here is an exact quote from one of his interviews.

     
  19. cram

    cram Member

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    Exactly!

    Plus, the OP is putting metronome and exercise work in a box as if, "You are going to play 16th notes in this scale up and down the fretboard and if you DARE to sway in tempo or god forbid; feeling, you will be thrown into a pit and forced to listen to a local easy listenning radio station!"

    My exercise time is to get my fingers used to a pattern or two, but once I become familiar with it, I venture out with the clicks still going by accenting certain beats or using it as a jumping point into a more familiar phrase.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2008
  20. jzucker

    jzucker Supporting Member

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    agreed cram!

    I find it funny how Black and White the OP wants to take this. Ain't nuthin' wrong with practicing exercises but they need to be turned into music at the earliest opportunity. I have no doubt that GG did this, whether he admits to it or not. ;)

    Same with Trane, Brecker, McLaughlin, Tony Grey, Wayne Krantz, etc. They all practiced exercises at one time or another with a metronome.
     

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