Exercises for learning to recognize Pitch?

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by vhollund, Jan 3, 2008.

  1. vhollund

    vhollund Member

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    I have a pretty good realtive hearing and Intuitive hearing but It could be great to always know exactly the name of the note beeing played just by recognizing the height of it
     
  2. Bryan T

    Bryan T Guitar Owner Silver Supporting Member

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    What do you mean by height? Pitch? Position on the staff in written music?

    Bryan
     
  3. vhollund

    vhollund Member

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    "Perfect Pitch" ? in english (im Danish)
    Knowing instantly the name of the note by hearing and recognition of the pitch,
     
  4. Bryan T

    Bryan T Guitar Owner Silver Supporting Member

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    I'm not sure perfect pitch can be learned. There is a series of books/recordings that attempts to teach it, but I don't know anyone who has successfully completed it.

    The general consensus seems to be that excellent relative pitch is more useful than perfect pitch.

    Bryan
     
  5. Mayflower

    Mayflower Supporting Member

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    reconizing intervals by #'s is much easier than calling the name of the note.
    What would make the difference in your playing/gigging situation to actually reconize what note it is?
    The Nashville # system is where it's at IMO.
     
  6. devinb

    devinb Member

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    In college every time I walked by a piano (which was a dozen times a day) I would try to sing the C below middle C and check it...got pretty good at it, but lost it later...I'm not sure I ever had it in my head strong enough that if I heard another pitch close to it I would have been able to still produce the C.

    I do think each note has a bit of character, or color to it. Whether I'll ever be able to recognize that color instantly in the context of other notes and such, I don't know...
     
  7. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    I have Burge's PP course and though I wasn't willing to put the work in to learn it, I think it can work if you put in the time. According to him, you should be able to tell pitch as easily as you can discern visual colors, but no one is taught/learns to listen inside each and every note from an early age/infancy like they are trained to discern colors. It's worth a try. And he has a money back guarantee (never had to use it so I don't know how good that guarantee is), so if you hate it, return it.

    Best of luck!

    Dave

    P.S. His relative pitch course is stellar!
     
  8. Bryan T

    Bryan T Guitar Owner Silver Supporting Member

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    I have a pretty good memory for the F# at the second fret of the high E string . . . but only on a steel string guitar. For whatever reason, that pitch/timbre combination is very vivid to me. The same note on a piano doesn't do the same thing for me.

    Bryan
     
  9. stratovarius

    stratovarius Supporting Member

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    I have the Perfect Pitch course that I bought many years ago and would be willing to let go of it cheap! I didn't realize that it required a partner to use it and no one was ever willing.
     
  10. Dana

    Dana Guest

  11. Tone_Terrific

    Tone_Terrific Member

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    I still don't get the idea of perfect pitch.
    Perfect relative to what. When, where, how is that base tone established?

    If a PP person hears a sligtly detuned instrument can they still identify the note or are they hopelessly confused, or do they adjust to the relative pitch and that becomes the new base? Can they then re-identify their original base?

    This might as well be mind-reading to me as it is so far from my scope of talent....which is darn tiny.
     
  12. Redhouse-Blues

    Redhouse-Blues Member

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    I started ear training over a month ago with my guitar teacher and I'm using this and it's working out great. Ear Master Pro, http://www.earmaster.com/ it's very easy to use and has a great tutor. You can download it and try it free.

    I'm also working with Musicians Institute's, Ear Training for the Comtemporary Musician book.

    All the teachers I know and Musicians say that Perfect Pitch ad stuff is B.S. and only a very few people can have perfect pitch. Relative pitch is what's important and can be learned and improved.
     
  13. Scott Miller

    Scott Miller Member

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    Recognizing intervals: Priceless.

    Recognizing a note: I don't see any use for this.
     
  14. devinb

    devinb Member

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    A person with PP can tell you any note without a reference point, like you can tell something is blue, without having to hold it up to a color you know is something else...

    Beethoven, Bach, Mozart all had PP...

    There are theories that people who are born in areas of the world where people speak 'tone' languages (meaning the same word has multiple meanings depending at the tone of the word) have PP at a rate many times what us English speakers do...

    To answer your other question, people I know with PP have said that it drives them crazy when a tone isn't in tune...for example, the hum of your car's wheels on the highway...
     
  15. vhollund

    vhollund Member

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    Thanks for all the answers

    Well Ive met several persons capable of doing it and saying like
    "thats F# slightly too sharp"

    You listen to, and remember, the notes as toneheights
    The same way you can completly hear a song you know well in your head from memory and in the right key

    I already have a very good relative hearing
    and I hear the chords to their function and their extentions pretty much on the spot
    Also I know all the intervals perfectly by ear and in theory

    ....Thats relative Hearing

    Intuitive hearing
    What you can do with intuitive hearing is go to a note i hear far away on the same string by hearing the note heigth and sensing the distance

    You can also sense notes you hear and forget their relativness completely

    This I do well too and its beginning of PP the but...

    Absolute Perfect Pitch means that you can allow your self to completely let go of the relativeness and only "see" noteheights

    You hear the notes independently and you play them starting right on the begining note you heard
    It also means you kan play notes suites by ear with a bigger interval than an octave (or two for that sake)
    and in a much more abstract harmonic context with a bass the walks in and out all over the place
    Not that it has to be wierd fusion
    But it changes the tonal perspective alot to have PP
     
  16. vhollund

    vhollund Member

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    I know there are some methods out there , books and CD , but i think all it takes is a good exercise
    How to aproach it ?
    If I use a sinustone maybe and have a program play the 12 notes randomly, and show the notename for 1 sec when i hit space , before playing next note

    maybe someone here knows how to make this quite simple computerprogram for pc?
    Hmmmm or maybe I can try to do it myself in C64 basics...
    ! ! !
     
  17. bluesjuke

    bluesjuke Disrespected Elder

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    I think subconciously we are better at this than we suspect.
    Many a time particularly when not paying any attention at all such as being busy reading I'll hear a song I don't know but automatically I go right to playing the correct key right off the bat.
    Strange how it just happens.
     
  18. vhollund

    vhollund Member

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    Exactly !


    My commodore skills are rusty
    Maybe the program could be done easily in flash by someone experienced?
     
  19. Tone_Terrific

    Tone_Terrific Member

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    I think that is just recognizing the root of the song and finding it quickly on your own instrument, possibly using other cues, as well. Even I can often do that.

    But hearing notes as colors doesn't make sense to me as there are many shades of color that are only apparent when compared, relative to one another, consider 'white,' for example.

    Unless, everyone but me, actually recognizes color to the specific hue:worried which might help explain my wardrobe choices...nah!
     
  20. bluesjuke

    bluesjuke Disrespected Elder

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    \
    Finding the root (key) for sure.
    Other cues I don't know.
    Mant times I start playing without even realizing that I didn't even intend to start.
    Just happen to have a guitar in my lap already and find myself playing unintentionally before I was even paying attention to the fact that I had already started.

    Most likely ingrained from playing a lot. Sort of like muscle memory is but for the brain.
     

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