Explain "Shut Up and Play Your Guitar" to me...

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by Jaimoe, Nov 22, 2008.

  1. Lucidology

    Lucidology Member

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    Ah ****... sorry I missed ya ... When I'm on line my phone doesn't answer...
    I'll tell you to call right now but I'm just on my way to Sunday night gig ... leaving in about 5 minutes ...
     
  2. LHanson

    LHanson Member

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    Frank's solos could be musical masturbation in front of an audience: He didn't care who else enjoyed it, he simply got his rocks off. If he played for anybody other than himself, he played for musicians that could get what he was up to. You have to remember that Frank was a drummer first, and that he was always looking for a polyrythmic quality, and a human interaction, to his solos. He got a thrill out of spreading a phrase over 9 7/8ths measures and ending at the same time as the drummer. I think the term he used was "hemiola".
     
  3. mtm105

    mtm105 Senior Member

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    Shut Up and Play Yer Guitar came around the same era when books were published with witty titles and the substance was bland. Books had cult status based on it's title.

    Same with album, IMO. No Biblical guitar substance anywhere.

    Inner Tennis. I'm OK. You're OK.
     
  4. chucke99

    chucke99 Member

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    Frank said that he named the album based on what he said rock critics had been telling him to do for years.

    "Return of the Son of Shut Up 'n Play Yer Guitar," from the third disc, is a flat-out masterpiece. If you know "Inca Roads", you can hum the outro melody from the original solo along to the solo and it fits (obviously) very well.

    It's hard to "rank" Frank alongside any other guitarists, whether Hendrix or Clapton, or anybody. He was just completely different from them all. I happen to think he was one of the best soloists ever, if not THE best.
     
  5. Tone_Boss

    Tone_Boss Member

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  6. Lolaviola

    Lolaviola Supporting Member

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    It's okay.
    It could have been a great instrumental album, if the songs had hooks, or even parts. (Think a whole album of 'Watermelon...' Style compositions.)
    Instead, it is a really strangely constructed album of segments of songs, featuring live musicians, with studio jamming overdubs. It just comes off as an off the cuff non-live, non-studio album.

    It sounds like Frank did it on one weekend.
    I am not really a fan of Zappa's musical ideas on this album, and as far as the album being a showcase for the guitar, uh, okay.

    I do like his songs, his personna, and the hole Zappa oevre so, I am a fan.
    I do love Frank's rhythmic phrasing on guitar, when he works up a frenzy, and that little hammer-on-with-the-pick thing he does. The flanger is amazing, and some other effects are ok, but nothing groundbreaking. But technique-wise he is just okay overall in the great pantheon of guitarists. Even Frank said around that time in Guitar Player that he rarely picked up the guitar between tours.
     
  7. LHanson

    LHanson Member

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    NecroPost!
     
  8. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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