Explain the reasoning behind the Tele Custom to me

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by james..., Jun 18, 2019.

  1. Mike Duncan

    Mike Duncan Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Got worried, thought you meant Custom Telecaster...whew.
     
  2. bertramladner

    bertramladner Supporting Member

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    I just got a custom deluxe and I love it. For someone that just likes single coils it drives the amp just enough to get the gritty dirt just right
     
  3. romiso

    romiso Silver Supporting Member

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    I owned a nice '72 CIJ Custom for a time. I replaced the pickups with Lollars (Regal and Special T) and ended up with a great guitar.

    I rarely use Tele neck pickups on their own, so to me it's all about the middle position. I liked having the independent volume and tone controls for each pickup and thought the middle position sound was glorious.

    I decided I like the Lollar Regals so much that I wanted a Deluxe-style so I can have two of them -- that's the guitar in my avatar (and below).

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Lonnie00

    Lonnie00 Member

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    I like the sound of a Les Paul and the aesthetics/ergonomics of a Strat so this is my main guitar. I would guess that's why the Tele Custom exists.

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Maggie_O

    Maggie_O Member

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    Ah! I just found an article:

    Although neither brand would be able to claim dominance in the hard rock world, during the late 1960s and early 70s, Gibson’s humbucker-equipped instruments were proving to be a popular choice for guitarists looking for a thicker, chunkier guitar tone. This trend was not lost on Fender. The comparatively thinner, percussive quality of their single coil pickups just wasn’t doing it for many guitar players and heavy rock did not appear to be getting any less popular.

    In a shrewd and calculated move Fender drafted the inventor of Gibson’s humbucker, Seth Lover, to take care of business, and in 1970 the Wide Range Humbucker was born. Its arrival was heralded by the unveiling of Fender’s second-generation Telecaster Thinline, Custom and Deluxe models in 1971 and 1972, followed by the Starcaster in 1976. This unique, fully adjustable, highoutput dual coil design utilised 12 CuNiFe (copper/nickel/iron) alloy magnets, wound to 10,000 turns with 42-gauge polysol wire, producing a whopping inductance of 4.85H and a DC resistance of 10.6 kilo-ohms.
     
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  6. VaughnC

    VaughnC Supporting Member

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    I typically don't like the sound of a humbucker in any guitar but the '72 Tele Custom is one of my favorite guitars. I bought an original back in '72 and sold it when I became a Strat guy. But I missed that Tele...and I recently found a new MIM Fender version of it at a good price and it sounds great to me. What I like about it is its 3 distinctive sounds, like a rainbow...and it doesn't have the murky sound of a traditional humbucker. My regular Tele sounds great too, but it doesn't have the range of sounds of the '72 Custom so, IMO, both have their place.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2019
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  7. zach sears

    zach sears Supporting Member

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    Couldn't agree with you more
     
  8. coldengray

    coldengray Supporting Member

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    Read the article I linked. They aren't bar magnets, that's the problem. It would cost Fender a fortune to reproduce CuNiFe threaded rods just to make pickups for one or two models. Fender doesn't make magnets, they buy what is available. An entire company (Telenator) tried to build accurate CuNiFe pickups and had to give up after 10 years because they couldn't make it happen. It's definitely NOT "an easy fix", as you said. There are, however, several very close reproductions that are discussed in detail in that article. Give it a read.
     
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  9. monty

    monty Member

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    100% agreed. And with the LP style control you can dial in a ton of tones.
     
  10. zenitB

    zenitB Supporting Member

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    there's a joke there...somewhere
     
  11. gyeniceri

    gyeniceri Member

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    I don't think Fender came up with the idea on their own.

    It should've been demand driven. Sometime, somewhere, one of their endorsers might have asked to have a neck humbucker, because, you know, everyone is after their own unique tone.

    The question is of course, would you like it?
     
  12. samarshll

    samarshll Member

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    I have a partscaster tele with high end components. It has an 80's gibson 57 in the neck and a Tom Anderson TD3. The neck p/u is coil tapped and it gives me a lot of versatility with a 3 way switch. Each pickup has its own volume control. The type of neck pick up matters. The luthier that put this together tried many different p/u combinations before he settled on this configuration.

     
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  13. gmann

    gmann Member

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    In all the pics I've seen of him using one, the toggle sw. is never in the neck position. Of course, I expect people will now post pics of it but I've never seen it.
     
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  14. 2HBStrat

    2HBStrat Member

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    I'm sorry but your thread title "
    Explain the reasoning behind the Tele Custom to me" bothers me...it sounds funny...I think it SHOULD be "Explain to me the reasoning behind the Tele Custom"...

    The Telecaster Custom was produced in a time when Fender was trying a lot of new things using the Telecaster platform, and that was just one of them. It wasn't very successful, which is why is was discontinued, and it only because pseudo-popular with the indie bands because they could be gotten cheaply, so now Fender reissued them...

    Even back then I always thought the Stratocaster platform was the better one for modding, but the Strat was already not selling well...
     
  15. TJT79

    TJT79 Member

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    I guess if you like the percussive cutting sound of a tele bridge pickup, and want the option of a flutier, thicker lead tone then it makes sense.

    It wouldn't be my first choice but I don't think it's that hard to understand.

    By the way, the Creamery do an excellent Wide Range pickup - both in the bigger original size and aldo in a standard HB size.
     
  16. Ace1432

    Ace1432 Member

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    our friend Tab Benoit can offer some assistance in answering that.
     
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  17. Silver Hand

    Silver Hand Member

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    They don't even need CuNiFe to get significantly closer to a wide range sound than what they do now. It's purely cost vs increase in sales. They don't believe (and they're probably correct) that the increase in cost for a new run of magnets, bobbins, construction, training, ect will be exceeded by an increase in sales from making more accurate WRHB's.

    It's possible to get immensely closer to the originals than their current offerings without using CuNiFe. Telenator used to even offer a pickup option that had Alnico rods in place of half the CuNiFe rods, for people who couldn't afford a full CuNiFe WRHB.
     
  18. mvsr990

    mvsr990 Supporting Member

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    Closer but still not actually authentic, which was my point - so why invest the money in guitars that retail for $825? A pair of Lollar Regals is $420 - even with the scale of a Fender operation, you're talking about adding 25% to the cost of a niche guitar and you'll still have people who say they're not legit enough.
     
  19. Tonekat

    Tonekat Supporting Member

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    In the '60s, the local guys who had real, gigging bands and learned some stuff would slap a humbucker in the neck position on a Tele.
     
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  20. 3waytie4last

    3waytie4last Unfluencer Gold Supporting Member

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    Seemed to work for this guy...

    [​IMG]


    ...and, "humbuggy"? C'mong man! :facepalm
     

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