Explaining EVH's Impact To Today's Youth

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by Sloppyfingers, Nov 14, 2019.

  1. Sloppyfingers

    Sloppyfingers Member

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    I'm almost finished watching Pete Thorn's Sunday live epi 93.
    Anyways, he stated something that has resonated with me and echoes the sentiments that I had for some years.That being that the two real big game changers has been Jimi Hendrix followed by EVH, and essentially lots of great players in between and after. We're talking major game changers here.
    I'm too young to BE THERE for Jimi, but I do remember how when EVH came on the scene he literally made me and half of the young kids on my block want to pick up the guitar, buy star licks cassettes, and put striped tape on our cheap Hondo guitars. Many gave up after a few years, but some of us soldiered on. I can imagine that Jimi had this same effect on kids in the late 60's.I've always used the analogy that what EVH did for our generation is essentially what Tony Hawk did for kids later on wanting to pick up skate boards..Is this a fair analogy/comparison?.I can't really think of another one to use..I just don't know any other way to explain this to my now 20 year old nephew and some of his friends who picked up the guitar. I'm out of touch a little bit with who they look up to. Are there even any contemporary players that are even close to having the same effect as EVH or Hendrix had on past generations?
     
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  2. Young Dad

    Young Dad Supporting Member

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    Kurt Cobain inspired me to pick up the guitar. Never found any EVH remotely interesting.
     
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  3. blueworm

    blueworm Member

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    Kids are too young to be there for EVH
     
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  4. Sloppyfingers

    Sloppyfingers Member

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    Yes true. But when trying to explain his impact, I often use Tony Hawk and what he did for that whole skate board culture. It's the only non guitar thing I can think of.

    Yes he was definitely was a game changer in a non guitar centric way. Kurt ironically pioneered that whole scene that killed that over indulgent guitar scene that EVH had a big part of starting, but needed to eventually die.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2019
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  5. sws1

    sws1 Member

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    Remember when people used to talk to one another...then the iPhone came along and social behavior changed almost overnight?
     
  6. dreamspace

    dreamspace Supporting Member

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    Truth be told, young guitarists starting out today don't care too much about Jimi or Eddie unless brought up on that stuff. Most seem to be influenced by the top guitarists on Youtube and Instagram - and will probably discover both Jimi and EVH later down the road. I've lost count of how many times I've heard beginners point out these pioneering and "amazing, groundbreaking" guitarists on Instagram that are essentially playing the same stuff someone did 30 years ago.

    Take Mateus Asato, Plini, etc. for example - great guitarists, no doubt; But it's not like they're bringing anything new to the table. But still, people are going crazy about 'em, calling them the most unique and innovative guitarists :dunno

    edit:

    What I'm trying to say is: Guitarists are influenced by the musicians listen to / are exposed to. Most younger people today get their new artists through for example social media - instagram is pretty huge on this. You don't really see many of the classics on these channels (for obvious reasons), which means new people aren't getting exposed to their music.

    The modern guitar "influencers" are the rising stars and new Eddie Van Halens of this generation.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2019
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  7. el greco

    el greco Member

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    The screen took over the brain?
     
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  8. ant_riv

    ant_riv Supporting Member

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    I think explaining any guitarists’ impact is relevant to someone of that generation, only.
    Context is everything.
    Historic significance might matter to someone, if they are interested in digging deeper.

    When I started playing, I only cared about what I was listening to, which is what I wanted to know about.
    I didn’t care about some history lesson regarding music that I had never heard.

    Once I was hooked on playing, and exhausted my initial influences, I began to seek influences outside of my personal experience.
    Eventually I started to look into ‘game changers’ and earlier players.

    I think this is fairly normal. Of course, we all get excited about sharing what we are passionate about.
    It is often difficult to understand how someone else doesn’t feel that same excitement, when we try to share it.

    IMO.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2019
  9. Sloppyfingers

    Sloppyfingers Member

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    Yup..Perhaps if something like Van Halen1 were to be be released today, it would get missed and lost amongst all the instant information and people would move on from it to the next thing that's instantly at their fingertips.

    EVH started a movement, and almost overnight made kids excited and want to pick up the guitar was my point..It was a phenomena, that I don't think kids later on experienced in real time. I suppose Michael Jordan did the same thing for hoops in his era. In "real time" is more of where I was headed.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2019
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  10. Buzzard Luck

    Buzzard Luck Member

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    As far as the impact of an old rock guitarist, it’s now too late and incomparable because today’s youth have had access to the internet and computers their whole lives. They can find anything immediately. An old man who says ‘we couldn’t believe our ears’ sounds ridiculous to the youth who watch videos to enjoy music.

    Tosin Abassi (animals as leaders) is certainly one of the leaders in the young enthusiasts eyes these days, along with the gentle Plini, Nick, and Misha
     
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  11. Dark Matter

    Dark Matter Member

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    It's hard to be smug and irrelevant and the same time, but this comment pulls it off. The issue raised wasn't "how do you personally feel about EVH?", it was "are there any players today with the same impact?"

    And as one who was around at the time, I assure you that the answer to the question is "no." Eddie not only dominated the guitar world for a generation, he was a force in pop culture more broadly. VH caught the MTV wave and made some of the most popular videos of that whole era, and EVH references worked their way into movies (Back to the Future, Fast Times at Ridgemont High, etc), other artist's work (Michael Jackson, Hank Williams Jr., and others), and basic celebrity gossip (marriage to Valerie Bertinelli, popular actress). Young players today are of course massively skilled, but in terms of impact on either music or culture, there is no one with even 1% of the stature he had from 1978 through at least 1991.

    I would also assure you that your hero is also essentially unknown to today's kids. I teach high school, and while of course there are still fans, to the average 16 year-old today Kurt Cobain is just as distant and irrelevant as EVH. 1993 is no different to them than 1978. Kids today actually know and respond to a fair amount of older music, but not at a visceral level. It's just nice old stuff. Even Led Zeppelin is kind of quaint to them. But whatever the kids think of him today, EVH was as giant in his day as any guitar player has ever been.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2019
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  12. Buzzard Luck

    Buzzard Luck Member

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    That’s a nice idea, but not accurate. Those kids still didn’t have much money, and the market didn’t offer much in the way of affordable guitars. It was not overnight. Nothing moved overnight in a national sense in 1978. It took a while. By the early to mid 80’s Billy Ray and the achy breaky heart actually moved more consumers to visit their local music shop and purchase a guitar. By that time, the VH fans were catching up as well as the manufacturers.
     
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  13. circle_o_5ths

    circle_o_5ths Member

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    What is the point of the endeavor? If they want to go back to research how we got to where we are, great. If not, it makes no difference.
     
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  14. Sloppyfingers

    Sloppyfingers Member

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    Yes agreed..Van Halen1 was still fresh and young players were getting excited about well into the 80's as if it were just released.Things affecting Pop culture hung around and made them relevant longer I suppose..Especially music.
     
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  15. Buzzard Luck

    Buzzard Luck Member

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    That’s quite a historical overview, impressive, hysterical, but it reads like a wiki article and not something experienced firsthand. Back then, before the internet and computers, there were just a few magazines, and not Much else, especially for middle America. Most average fans had access to far less information about stars, much less musicians. The average fan didn’t even know what some of their favorite musicians looked like in those days. They only heard a tune on the radio. A broad force in pop culture? Please stop the hyperbole. It was dribs and drabs back then.
     
  16. Sloppyfingers

    Sloppyfingers Member

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    I was there for both. Achy breaky came out in the 90's, and not even close. Billy Ray didn't make kids want to pick up the guitar en Masse like EVH did.That whole notion is laughable.. And yes, there were affordable guitars in the early 80's.Billy Ray was however a part of the whole line dancing scene which was big at that time.
     
  17. 3waytie4last

    3waytie4last Unfluencer Gold Supporting Member

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    Jimi was the biggest influence on me when I started, and that was in the 80s when EVH was big. Depends on what you’re into.

    I think the most interesting guitarist today is St. Vincent, and her music is probably more relevant to the youth.

     
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  18. Buzzard Luck

    Buzzard Luck Member

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    Talk to some retailers, get some history lessons from the boots on the ground and not the internet. Guitars started selling again thanks to billy Ray. Country fans actually had jobs and enough extra cash to buy a full set of gear. ( guitar, amp, accessories) Rockers generally didn’t. It wasn’t till then that a decent pointy guitar was hanging on the wall anyways.
     
  19. Go Cat Go!!

    Go Cat Go!! Member

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    In the late 70s I was a kid into hard and southern rock as well as fusion. Page, Frehley, Perry and Nugent were my heros. I had been playing for ab out a year when I heard Van Halen for the first time. It was Dance the Night Away. I didn't like it at all. Way to poppy. Remember Sam Goody record stores? The one by me also sold musical instruments. I was at the cashier getting some strings when I heard the most outrageous guitar being played. It was a jaw dropping moment. What the heck is that? Oh that's Eruption. It was a new era of guitar. My old heros were just old. Van Halen was new and exciting. Anytime you would walk into a Sam Ash or Mannys there kids tapping away. And his tone was just huge! Nobody else sounded or played like him.

    I think we forget also as popular as tapping lots of kids were also playing Stray Cat Blues. That riff was everywhere as well.
     
  20. Slash

    Slash Supporting Member

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    There are a few players that really changed the direction and shape of music. Jimi and Eddie are two of the most prominent to me. Can you imagine if you remove either one... no Jimi records no Eddie records how much that would change what we heard over the years. The soundscape of rock music would be totally different.
     

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