Fairfield Circuitry 2020 Pedal Prediction?

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4,567
Technically I don't understand why Feed and Wet aren't just one knob. Can someone explain?

Wet/dry are just levels of your wet/dry signal

Feed feeds the output back to the input for whacky results (still on the wet side)

With feed down, you can just have wet/dry level adjustments. IE you could use the pedal to give you a "wet" mix for pedals that don't have a mix knob. No need to use the feedback for that function.
 
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Haloskater24

Member
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334
Forgive me if this sounds like a stupid question but could I use the Hors D’oeuvre to make a “Wet/Dry” rig? Like with two amplifiers?
 

Empros

Member
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10,503
Forgive me if this sounds like a stupid question but could I use the Hors D’oeuvre to make a “Wet/Dry” rig? Like with two amplifiers?

It's mono in and mono out, so you won't be able to send Wet and Dry signals to separate amplifiers.
If you put your entire pedalboard into the feedback loop, you could essentially emulate, in mono, a wet / dry mix. So kinda yes, kinda no?
 

cyberprimate

Member
Messages
139
I wonder how this stacks up against the Total sonic annihilation 2.

I wonder as well. I like the idea of a having a limiter in the TSA2, but the wet/dry knobs are useful, although I have parallel router which makes it less necessary for me. Also the TSA2 can be used as a dirt pedal on its own. But then you can always use a dirt pedal in the feedback loop of the Hors d'œuvre. I'd like to see a graphic explanation of how these two pedals work.

KNOBs had demonstrated the possibilities of a feedback looper so clearly and so musically.
 
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Haloskater24

Member
Messages
334
I wonder as well. I like the idea of a having a limiter in the TSA2, but the wet/dry knobs are useful, although I have parallel router which makes it less necessary for me. Also the TSA2 can be used as a dirt pedal on its own. But then you can always use a dirt pedal in the feedback loop of the Hors d'œuvre. I'd like to see a graphic explanation of how these two pedals work.

KNOBs had demonstrated the possibilities of a feedback looper so clearly and so musically.
Fairfield says it has JFet preamps in the In and return Inputs so I’m wondering could you get some dirt from this like the TSA on its own.
 

splatt

david torn / splattercell
Platinum Supporting Member
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27,886
I wonder as well. I like the idea of a having a limiter in the TSA2, but the wet/dry knobs are useful, although I have parallel router which makes it less necessary for me. Also the TSA2 can be used as a dirt pedal on its own. But then you can always use a dirt pedal in the feedback loop of the Hors d'œuvre. I'd like to see a graphic explanation of how these two pedals work.

KNOBs had demonstrated the possibilities of a feedback looper so clearly and so musically.

knobs always does, yes!

but, it's so EASY for you to try a feedback looper for yourself!
so easy.
BUT, YOU GOTTA BE CAREFUL!
DON'T TRY THIS IF YOU DON'T UNDERSTAND OR CAN'T FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS.

VOLUME CAN GET DANGEROUS VERY QUICKLY WHEN YOU DO THIS! SO:
DO NOT USE HEADPHONES!
ALWAYS START WIH ALL VOLUME CONTROLS OFF!
MAKE ALL CHANGES TO CONTROLS SLOWLY & CAUTIOUSLY.



get a little mixer with a few channels & a Master Out, hopefully w/some channel EQ, maybe a send-control.
turn the volume completely OFF.

don't plug in a guitar.

take the direct 1/4" output of any channel, and plug that output into the 1/4" input of that same channel.
now, turn that channel up a bit.
turn up the Master Out just a bit.

then, keeping your hand on the Master volume at all times, turn the channel up JUST A LITTLE.
now, gradually & gently move the channel volume up & down.
play with the EQ on that channel, each band..... see/hear what happens.

once you've done this you can understand:
every electronic control in this FEEDBACK LOOP affects both pitch and timbre (and rhythm/beating); the more controls there are, the more variation & interaction there will be in the resultant feedback oscillation.

so, now: pull the VOLUMES all the way down.
take out a fuzz pedal and a delay pedal: the more controls on each of them, the better.

plug your channel direct out to the fuzz box in, the fuzz box out to the delay in, the delay out to the channel input:
more complex feedback loop:
go slowly! always keeping your hand on the mixer's volume control.

then, imagine your guitar in such a loop..... fed by your sound.
 
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aaronjcurtis

Member
Messages
3,486
Got the Long Life in today (woo buying Canadian!) and it's pretty sweet thus far. Great range.... oscillates, too!
Needs 150mA, which was a little surprising, but all good. Will post some more when I get some quality time with it.

It says 95mA at 9v in the manual. Does yours say something different on the box?
 

Send_Noodles

Member
Messages
7
You mean by itself? (no fuzz pedal in the loop). How does that work?
With the feedback pot, even if you have no effect in the loop (you do need to close the loop with a patch cable), you drive the JFET working the return.

It's especially cool because you can still bring in some dry tone, and if you find the sweet spot with the right amount of feedback you can get some gnarly fuzz tones out of it.
 

Empros

Member
Messages
10,503
Long Life ramblings....

The Tilt EQ is really nice. It's dialed in perfectly - I do not need or want separate 3-band EQ.
Like every Fairfield pedal, the controls are all very interactive. Dialing in a harsh Freq + Q combination and then using the Tilt EQ to mellow it out can make some cool sounds.
Really adds some nice sparkle to a dark guitar, too.

I've got it after dirt but before mod/delay/reverb.
 

Haloskater24

Member
Messages
334
So in a sense the Feedback looper is also a signal splitter? I’m guessing mixing two amps with it would cause Ground loop hum? I asked FC but didn’t get a response.
 

Empros

Member
Messages
10,503
Quick little clip running a FM-rate (super fast rate that modulates itself) wave into the CV Control for 'Q'. Pretty obvious when it's kicked on!




Edit to add in another short clip....
This one starts with the Q almost at minimum.
Increasing Q until it starts to oscillate.
Then playing with the frequency knob for the rest of it.

 
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cyberprimate

Member
Messages
139
Guillaume Fairfield: "Another technique that doesn't get used as often as it should is to create feedback loops, which have a huge impact on the available palette of sounds from a given set of pedals. Pitch shifters in feedback loops are wonderful." (Pedal Crush p285)

What I find surprising is that there's no compressor in the Hors d'oeuvre considering there was one in the Meet Maude, which gave the option of taming the oscillation and not have it spiralling out of control.
 




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