Falling in Love Again...

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by alguit, Jan 3, 2006.

  1. alguit

    alguit Guest

    Has anyone here ever put a pedal away for a while and then taken it out and rekindled their love affair with it?

    For me, it happened this week with three pedals:

    Fulltone Fulldrive II-I think I fell into the trap of thinking that so many pedals have come out since its arrival that surely some of them must be better. Uh-uh; into a clean amp it has a crisp, warm tone that is terrific with a nice Strat, and the Boost feature adds really usable extra gain. Into an already-overdriven amp it can create a wide array of distortion flavors. It's back on my board.

    Bixonic Expandora-this is going on my board for the first time. I always thought it was nice, but nothing so extraordinary. However, in the time since I put it away, I've moved on to some excellent fifty-watt heads and a couple of exceptional combos, and when I plugged it into each this week..wow, the tones I could pull up by manipulating the gain and drive knobs and the solid push it provids woke me up to its potential.

    Nine-Volt Nirvana Dinosaur Fuzz. I guess Joe Gagan isn't making these anymore, and that's a shame. It's a hybrid that utilizes silicon and germanium transistors together, and it's got very high components in it. It also lets the user set a rhythm level and has a second footswitch to go between that and a lead volume.

    It definitely works best in a cranked amp, and when I first bought it I seemed to always be using master-volume amps that were so low volume wise (vile soundmen!) that I couldn't bring out the best in the pedal. The other day, though, I got to play it through a cranked Reeves 50 watt head as well as through my Straub Cantus, and I was stunned at how rich and flexible it is!

    So, how about you?:)
     
  2. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    It's why I hate to sell pedals.

    Of course, as a novelty, it WAS pretty cool to sell a few and get another...but generally I find, as your situation changes, so do the pedals you want to use.

    Spent a few years recording at home. Some pedals work better for that, but then got in a band. Suddenly I liked different pedals and rediscovered them. But it isn't just that...getting in a band ended up making me practice WAY more, and as I practiced my style evolved a little, and instead of just hitting the notes I went for more nuances...and some pedals play well with dynamics, at higher volumes, so I "reaudition" my pedals from time to time to see if one I already have has just become more in line with my style.

    Another point I think is relavent here, if any of you folks are like me, when I first get a pedal I try and "put it through its paces" and find out what sounds good with my playing. Try different settings. If I fall in love with a pedal it becomes a "regular" on my board. Maybe for, now that I think about it...probably WAY less than I would have guessed, maybe 3 practices with the band I'll make small tweaks on it. Depending on the pedal I may have a couple of settings I settle into. But after a while I probably go between the "presets" I know work.

    If I retire a pedal, or never make it a regular, I might try again in a few months, but then I start tweaking all over again and my find a combination I missed or a use I hadn't thought of.

    That's the fun part of all of this. I love it when I rediscover a good ol' pedal I had taken for granted.
     
  3. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    I kinda losst my train of thought there...what I meant to get at too was, sometimes a pedal ON your pedalboard is a good candidate to "fall in love with again" because of what I mentioned. That we tend to settle in to from one to a couple of settings, and then think "that's how THAT pedal sounds" and take it for granted.

    So even for pedals on your board, it can give a great reward to try and listen to it with new ears, and try more radical settings that aren't "natural" for you. If we have had a lot of experience with one type of pedal too, we maybe approach it with the same set of assumptions about generally where to start with the settings. This can be a mistake. Sometimes it's good to "throw out everything you think you know" and just tweak and listen to what happens. And again, as time goes by you may be changing in your style so a new setting or combination might unlock a new sound you didn't know you could get.

    It never gets old!
     
  4. rewog

    rewog Member

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    ...And sometimes you can judge a pedal, and then try it with a different guitar and/or amp, and it's completely different.
    I use a PRS Soapbar with a Peavey Classic 20 - My son comes over regularly for a jam with a Levinson strat and a Marshall. A pedal that sounds bad with one combo sometimes sounds great with the other.
    I have to say the Soapie is more pedal friendly than the Levinson.
     
  5. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    That's a cool point too. It is what is fun, as well as what is sometimes a pain. That EVERY time almost that you get some new piece of equipment, you really need to retry it all :)
     
  6. derek_32999

    derek_32999 Member

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    I very frequently fall in love with my guitars over and over. Seems as though it is almost in a cycle, like strings get old on strat....... fall in love with tele. Strings get old on tele... fall in love with les paul. As long as I am in love though, i am happy. I love all my pedals wether they are in a box or on the board. If I didn't, I would turn them over for something I could love.
     
  7. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    Um...you know, you CAN actually change out the strings?
    I know where I'm going dumpster diving now at least...


    :Devil


    Kidding...I know what you mean. I do the same thing.

    I also find when trying to hone in on an elusive sound I want, sometimes doing ONE drastic thing....switch pickups, turn tone control way down, switch from modern to vinatage on the pedal, OR switch guitars, and sometimes you discover a completely different sound you weren't after, but that is really a find.

    That's kind of the same thing, but I most often to the pickup thing, or switch guitars when I have it close to what I wanted. It can go either way, but from single-coil to Humbuckers can be interesting, and visa-versa.
     
  8. Moe45673

    Moe45673 Member

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    and women don't believe that men can love them and still sleep around :moon
     
  9. alguit

    alguit Guest

    :AOK
     
  10. Alienhead

    Alienhead Member

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    This pedal is a great pedal by itself. I find it does not work well with other overdrive pedals in most situations. It tends to get a bit noisey. I hesitate to sell it because it is dead quiet and shines by itself. This whole pedal thing is a lot of work. But I just hate to sell the damn things because I'll end up missing them. I keep a chest full of pedals. They all come in handy when recording! Wish I hadn't sold that damn Klon!!
     

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