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Fan for underneath a pedalboard?

williamsnrb

Member
Messages
238
Hey All,

Has anyone added a small fan or two (I'm thinking like a DC computer fan) under their board to keep components cool? My power supply is mounted underneath and it gets pretty warm after 20-30 minutes. I have a spare variable voltage output on the power supply that goes from 6-15v, so I'm thinking of wiring 1-2 small fans that could plug into that spare output to keep it cool underneath the board. Anyone done that? If so, any thoughts on it and how to best wire it up? Some of the fans I've found are 5.5V. Thanks!
 

mabinogeon

A really hoopy frood.
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,570
I did exactly what you're describing with a 12v computer fan. Ran it at 9v off an unused tap on my power supply. It was quiet and moved air.

I redesigned my board to have an open back, so got rid of the fan. But it can be done.
 

williamsnrb

Member
Messages
238
How hot do the pedals get? I don't think a fan should be needed.
Better put one inside your tube amp if it hasn't one installed.
Well, the pedals on top of the board aren't getting hot, but I do have a pedal and a dedicated buffer underneath and they get warm. The main thing that gets pretty hot is the power supply (and then that warms up cables and other components). It's not burning hot, but a lot warmer than I'm comfortable with.

Good idea about putting one near the back of my tube amps. I actually have a fan in the room for that reason. :)
 

williamsnrb

Member
Messages
238
I did exactly what you're describing with a 12v computer fan. Ran it at 9v off an unused tap on my power supply. It was quiet and moved air.

I redesigned my board to have an open back, so got rid of the fan. But it can be done.
Awesome! That's just what I'm thinking. Did you wire it yourself? Was it worth the hassle? I'm just thinking about longevity of my components.
 

lefort_1

Nuzzled Firmly Betwixt
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
14,952
Y'all know he's going for the Steve Vai Hair-Fan look... why waste air on yer PSU when it can go on yer Toan?

Toan is in the Hair !




Sorry.. . I tried to come up with a Dead Crybaby Mod that'd toe-down to re-direct fan air up to your face when at these hot Summer-O-2020 Monster Jams...
but yeah, the premise is kinda lacking this year.
... so I went for the low-hanging fruit.
 

williamsnrb

Member
Messages
238
Y'all know he's going for the Steve Vai Hair-Fan look... why waste air on yer PSU when it can go on yer Toan?

Toan is in the Hair !




Sorry.. . I tried to come up with a Dead Crybaby Mod that'd toe-down to re-direct fan air up to your face when at these hot Summer-O-2020 Monster Jams...
but yeah, the premise is kinda lacking this year.
... so I went for the low-hanging fruit.
Hahaha.... that's good. I wonder if I can install two fans, then. I could have one for the PSU and one for my flowing locks.
 

Timtam

Member
Messages
2,067
Some inexpensive ebay laptop tables (~$40) have flat profile dual fans than screw on underneath. Cheap enough to scavenge the fans. Powered from 5v DC.
 

williamsnrb

Member
Messages
238
Some inexpensive ebay laptop tables (~$40) have flat profile dual fans than screw on underneath. Cheap enough to scavenge the fans. Powered from 5v DC.
That's another wonderful idea! Thanks for the input. I'll see if I can find one with dimensions that would work for my board. Thanks again!
 

8len8

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
13,172
The components in your power supply are rated up to at least 70 degC. A rule of thumb is that 70 degC is the temperature you can touch something for 1 second before getting a blister. That’s pretty hot. I don’t think you really need a fan.
 

williamsnrb

Member
Messages
238
The components in your power supply are rated up to at least 70 degC. A rule of thumb is that 70 degC is the temperature you can touch something for 1 second before getting a blister. That’s pretty hot. I don’t think you really need a fan.
That's good to know. Thanks for the advice! I haven't really tested how hot it will get. I've just noticed that after 20-30 minutes, it's hotter than I would like it to be. Thanks for the peace of mind. :)
 

williamsnrb

Member
Messages
238
In case anyone follows this in the future, I purchased these 3d printer fans from Amazon and wired three of them to an open 12v output on my psu (would have used four fans, but they draw 80ma each and my output only allowed 250ma draw). And the moral of the story is that I might not ever build another pedalboard without fans like this. They keep the components cool and do not add much noise. Great peace of mind!

 
Last edited:

ccouch7

Member
Messages
613
In case anyone follows this in the future, I purchased these 3d printer fans from Amazon and wired three of them to an open 12v output on my psu (would have used four fans, but they draw 80ma each and my output only allowed 250ma draw). And the moral of the story is that I might not ever build another pedalboard without fans like this. They keep the components cool and do not add much noise. Great peace of mind!
Cool :drink:), could you post some pics of how you did the fans on your board?

My power supply is crammed pretty tightly inside/under my board, so I added four little blower fans (on an on/off toggle switch) to blow some of the heat out of there.
It definitely helps, especially in hot conditions.

I made a little preforated aluminum plate to mount them on that is raised about an 1/8" off the bottom of the case, so the fans draw air from both sides and blow towards the power supply.
The power supply itself is also raised up about an 1/8" off the bottom of the case, and has about an 1/8" gap at the the back and top (when the tier is mounted), to try and let air flow all around it.

Here's a few pics of how I did mine -
HXFXPB -REV 5 (1).jpg
HXFXPB -REV 5 (4).jpg
HXFXPB -REV 5 (6).jpg
HXFXPB -REV 5 (7).jpg
HXFXPB -REV 5 (11).jpg
HXFXPB -REV 5 (13).jpg

I made the little fan assembly easily removable via four #10-32 cap head machine screws, through the bottom of the case.
So I could change it up easily if I wanted to in the future.;)

Here's the boards signal flow just in case anyone is interested -
HXFXPB -REV 5 (2).jpg
 
Last edited:

williamsnrb

Member
Messages
238
Cool :drink:), could you post some pics of how you did the fans on your board?

My power supply is crammed pretty tightly inside/under my board, so I added four little blower fans (on an on/off toggle switch) to blow some of the heat out of there.
It definitely helps, especially in hot conditions.

I made a little preforated aluminum plate to mount them on that is raised about an 1/8" off the bottom of the case, so the fans draw air from both sides and blow towards the power supply.
The power supply itself is also raised up about an 1/8" off the bottom of the case, and has about an 1/8" gap at the the back and top (when the tier is mounted), to try and let air flow all around it.

Here's a few pics of how I did mine -
View attachment 286884
View attachment 286885
View attachment 286886
View attachment 286887
View attachment 286888
View attachment 286889

I made the little fan assembly easily removable via four #10-32 cap head machine screws, through the bottom of the case.
So I could change it up easily if I wanted to in the future.;)

Here's the boards signal flow just in case anyone is interested -
View attachment 286930
That's awesome! Pretty similar to what I did. I wired three fans to a 250ma output on my power supply and mounted one fan next to the power supply to apply direct air flow to the PSU and the other two fans were installed in the surface gap, one blowing down into the underside of the board and one blowing upward to bring hot air out (circulate the air). It has worked amazingly well. Before, it would get pretty warm, but now it stays cool for however long I play. I may never have a board without a fan again.
 

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