Fanned frets

Discussion in 'Bass Area; The Bottom Line' started by Gretschman, Jun 27, 2008.

  1. Gretschman

    Gretschman Member

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    I am not a Bass player .
    I want to buy a nice Bass guitar for my Studio .
    does anyone play a neck with Fanned Frets on it ?
    I heard that they had advantages to tuning and sound , but not very many people would play them .
    So , are they worth a look at ?
     
  2. testing1two

    testing1two Gold Supporting Member

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    Since this is for your studio, I would avoid anything that would slow down the recording process. If a bass player needs 30 minutes or an hour to get comfortable with the fanned fret system, that's wasted time IMHO. I would suggest an industry standard bass that suits the kind of music you record the most. More than likely that will take the form of a P-Bass, Jazz Bass, or Stingray (or some incarnation of these basic designs). Just make sure you have them set up and intonated properly so they're always ready to go at a moment's notice.
     
  3. Gretschman

    Gretschman Member

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    Love your Quote:

    Owning Pro Tools makes you no more an engineer than owning Turbo Tax makes you a CPA...

    That's Funny LOL

    You make a very good and valid point for sure .

    The thing is , Everyone in Nashville already has those instruments .
    I feel that it would be redundant to have them .

    Because I am more artist driven than others , My setup is full of
    gear that is geared toward artistic development .

    I am in no hurry and take my time to do the things that I feel produce
    a quality product .

    The thought of having better gear appeals to me . If a Fanned fretted Bass is better , then thats the one I want to buy .

    I know a lot of players here that will come over and play it .

    They would never buy one , but play one , yes .

    Not everyone is struck in the 60's , 70's 80's ect .

    There are players who are looking for a chance to grow and expand
    on their skills .
     
  4. ghoti

    ghoti Member

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    Personally, I'd prefer a fretless.
     
  5. testing1two

    testing1two Gold Supporting Member

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    I'm not disagreeing with your point about making your studio more appealing to artists, In fact I think it's admirable. But there's a reason every studio in Nashville has those types of basses...they deliver exceptional results in the hands of all kinds of players. Fanned fret basses are only advantageous if you play a lot on the B-string, where the scale length is increased the most. Otherwise, it's just another boutique bass that costs lots of money but doesn't necessarily translate into better bass tracks or appeal to wide varieties of players. If you planned on having a stable of studio basses, then I think having a Dingwall makes great sense, but that wouldn't be the first bass I'd buy for my studio, or the second...If you really want to make bass players happy, get a great vintage Fender or anything from Roger Sadowsky and you'll have to pry them out of the player's hands at the end of a session.

    Just my $.02
     
  6. Thor

    Thor Member

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    Going to have to agree with the other posters. If you were considering a fanned fret bass for a personal instrument, I would encourage you to go for it, as you may love it. If the purpose is to have it for use by other musicians, you would be best served by getting something that is comfortable right off the bat. A bass that stays closer to the tried and true "F" formula is a good way to go. Fretted 4 or 5, and a fretless 4 and you are off to the races.

    If you want to have something in the studio that could inspire some experimentation, maybe pick up a Chapman Stick - a very different instrument, but one that may conjure up some novel ideas and lines in the right hands.

    Cheers,

    Edward
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2008
  7. Gretschman

    Gretschman Member

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    Thanks for all the great input .

    I never realized how many choices there were for Bass guitar and all of
    the different styles out there .

    I think I'll survey a few more studio players around town .

    This is a lot harder than I wanted it to be . I already own 35 guitars whats a few more right ?
     
  8. Dingwall

    Dingwall Member

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    As much as I hate to admit it, I agree with the above posts. If you're going to stock your studio with a bass for players to walk in and roll tape, you should stick with the tried and true.

    On the other hand, every session player in Nashville is going to own their own Fender or Fender variant. My guess is that they'd all prefer to bring their own for comfort and familiarities sake. In which case your shiny new F-style is going to sit un-used unless it's a really special vintage piece $$$$$.

    So from this perspective your original idea makes good sense, IF as an engineer or producer you find the evenness of tone and clarity that our basses provide nice to work with. These properties are as important if not more important than the quality of the B-string IMHO.

    We get a lot of compliments from producers (heavy ones included) about the way our basses record.

    The look of the fanned-frets scares people - or at least the conservative types. I can only speak for our basses, but if the lines are all below the 12th fret, adjusting to the fanned-frets is a non-issue. Especially if the player doesn't look down, and probably in your situation - one of our Super J's as they have the most Fender-like feel and tone.

    The reality is that you really have to try for yourself. As an option to buying a bass sight unseen, I'd recommend seeing if you could hire Craig Nelson for a few sessions and ask him to bring along his Super J. Your question would be answered and you'd get a GREAT session out of it as well.
     
  9. Dingwall

    Dingwall Member

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  10. The Golden Boy

    The Golden Boy Member

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    That's awesome.

    Giving respectable advice, even if it means not selling a bass.
     
  11. Thor

    Thor Member

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    +1

    Class act to be sure. I would love to pick one up for myself some day.

    Cheers,

    Edward
     
  12. Gretschman

    Gretschman Member

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    Thanks for your input .

    I glad that you understood the logic in the direction I want to go in .

    Buying a Bass guitar is every bit as complex as all of the other choices that I have gone through in selecting musical gear .

    Microphones were a nightmare , then rack gear , software , converters , monitors , monitoring systems , and so on . I don't know why I thought it might be easier .

    I think that I will stick to my gut feeling on this one and focus in on the fanned fretted bass . Buying anything else would be redundant .

    Besides , I am a very good at selecting all of the components to achieve
    the correct tone . I own the best amps , speakers and speaker cabinets
    and have the recording chain ready to go .

    Now all I have to do is have one made and play it .
     

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