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Favorite Concert Opener Memory

GuitarGuy66

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
8,148
Mötley Crüe did this neat entrance on one tour where they had this big clock counting down. It stopped at 0:04 and the band came through the crowd in a strange procession. It was pretty neat.


The Foo Fighters were on their Break a Leg tour with the throne. It was a bit after Dave had broken his leg so we weren't sure if he would be walking or not...

He was in the throne, and had a great entrance.
 

ceeinwa

Member
Messages
280
August 14, 2002. Rush had written, recorded, and released Vapor Trails after (in spite of?) the death of Neil's daughter and wife. I never thought they'd tour again, so to hear Tom Sawyer was quite emotional.
 

Wolfgangsta

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,579
I'm getting goose bumps reading this thread!
Here are a few that stand out for me.
(Finally!) seeing Motorhead open for The Foo Fighters a few years ago. "We are Motorhead and we play rock n roll." The perfect way to start an awesome show!
Seeing Van Halen in 2012 open with "Unchained".
Cinderella on their Long Cold Winter tour, around 1987-88. The stage is dark except for a dim light on Tom Kiefer playing "Bad Seamstress Blues". ALL of the lights flash in unison with the first note of "Falling Apart At The Seams". I think the whole area jumped back when it happened. Terrific show from start to finish. A few friends who weren't even big Cinderella fans left the show impressed.
 

ghengis99

Member
Messages
182
Comin' Atcha Live - Tesla! They were opening for Def Leppard! Tesla was just a breath of fresh air at the time. I went to that show a big DL fan, but left thinking that Tesla was the future and put on a much more energetic entertaining show. I'm still a fan to this day.
 

Omega

Member
Messages
2,168
Comin' Atcha Live - Tesla! They were opening for Def Leppard! Tesla was just a breath of fresh air at the time. I went to that show a big DL fan, but left thinking that Tesla was the future and put on a much more energetic entertaining show. I'm still a fan to this day.
Same exact thing, except I saw them opening for DLR. Bought Mechanical Resonance the next day. I was very impressed with them.
 

gennation

Member
Messages
7,386
David Bowie on the Station to Station Tour. This movie was the opener...Salvador Dali had a hand in this one.

 
Messages
2,323
SRV 1988.
Double bill with Robert Plant, SRV opened. I actually went to see Plant! I'd seen SRV once on Austin City Limits and wasn't all that impressed with that 'Texan Hendrix wannabe', so I wasn't expecting much, lol.

He opened with a blazing rendition of 'Come on', one of my favorite live Jimi tunes. I still get shivers thinking about it. SRV was on fire all night! Easily the most inspired guitar playing I have ever witnessed.
I saw that tour. Brought my then wife because she wanted to see Robert Plant. SRV killed it.
 

JGD5150

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,154
The reformed Little Feat in spring of 1989. They opened with Fat Man in the Bathtub, just like on Waiting For Columbus.

ACDC this past February. Opened with Rock or Bust.

Boston in 1986 on Third Stage tour, opened with More Than a Feeling.
 

saneff

Member
Messages
3,382
Prince & the Revolution. The Purple Rain Tour back in the mid 80s. Greensboro NC.

All lights are off, then suddenly Prince appears way out on a catwalk of the stage playing a guitar solo all by himself. Everywhere else remains dark. Plays solo for a while, then that light where he is way out on the catwalk goes dark. In a split second, Prince suddenly rises out of the stage when a spotlight moves to him. The Prince we had been seeing out on the catwalk was just a hologram, and I swear you couldn't tell it. I had good seats and it totally fooled me. Big time goose bumps.

And that was an incredible show.
 

rspencer

Member
Messages
2,385
Two come to mind.

Butthole Surfers. November 22, 1993. The Boathouse, Norfolk, VA.
All of the lights go out in the venue, except for a single bulb over the beer counter and one over the food counter.
It's almost pitch dark. One tiny bulb is lit on stage, in Gibby Haynes' vocal effects rack.
Gibby leans into that light, faintly illuminating just half of his face, and quietly speaks...
"Good evening, ladies and gentlemen."
And then fires 3 shotgun blasts before the band launches into "Dust Devil."

Robert Plant. October 11, 1990. Hampton Coliseum, Hampton, VA.
House lights went down and one by one, each band member came on stage. They played "Watching You," adding each instrument in until everyone was on stage. I would have thought it an odd choice for an opener, but it really worked.
This was the first show of the tour leg after Canada, and Plant had taken a vacation and explored the area. Instead of the far-too-common hello from bands that didn't know the difference from VA and WV, we got a welcome that included almost all of the area cities and counties, as well as "Outer Banks, North Carolina." Plant had called local radio station WNOR and done an impromptu phone interview from a payphone in Corrolla, NC.
 

teleman1

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
14,890
Hands down---B.B. King, opening for the Who and Jefferson Airplane at Tanglewood (Mass.), summer 1969.
I was there on a summer camp outing. The first few notes from B.B. King (he opened then with "Don't
Answer the Door") and I was absolutely staggered, I couldn't believe someone could make a guitar sound
like that. I was so hooked on him that I didn't want to know from the Who or the Airplane, both of
whom I loved. And I couldn't wait to get home from camp, get back to the cheap electric guitar my
maternal grandmother bought me as a gift two birthdays previous, and start teaching myself to play
a guitar seriously. (Not to mention get my mitts on the allowance my mother was saving for me all
summer long and buy as many blues records as the money and my fourteen-year-old arms could carry
out of the store!)

To this day I don't live a day without hearing B.B. King at least once.
I have been to a lot of concerts and also saw BB in 1969. Much more of a commanding performer back then. My DAD died when I was 11. Seeing him at 14 gave me that "don't worry Dad is is control feeling only a young man can get. He was powerful and his story telling got the crowd going. He was hot right out of the gate during his show.
 

teleman1

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
14,890
Not knowing exactly what I was in store for, the first opening song to Ziggy Stardust live dropped my jaw to the floor. Best concert I have ever seen, bar none.
 

Scott Miller

Member
Messages
7,366
"The original Mahavishnu Orchestra in '73, Chicago Auditorium."

I saw that band too, with the same opening. The only trouble was that the nearby yacht harbor broadcast an annoying BEEP every 18 seconds, which came out quite loud and clear from the PA.
 

lazyjames

Member
Messages
1,159
Perhaps not my favorite, but definitely the most memorable: Peter Murphy opening the show on his Deep tour in the dark, just acoustic guitar and voice carrying the fragile, haunting "Strange Kind of Love." The sound of his incredibly rich baritone voice was chill-inspiring.

This happened in my early twenties; until this time my popular music concert experience was almost entirely flashy, bombastic metal bands. This was quite a change of pace and a whole different kind of powerful.
 

A-Bone

Montonero, MOY, Multitudes
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
101,140
Perhaps not my favorite, but definitely the most memorable: Peter Murphy opening the show on his Deep tour in the dark, just acoustic guitar and voice carrying the fragile, haunting "Strange Kind of Love." The sound of his incredibly rich baritone voice was chill-inspiring.

This happened in my early twenties; until this time my popular music concert experience was almost entirely flashy, bombastic metal bands. This was quite a change of pace and a whole different kind of powerful.
Peter Murphy is a great performer.
 

frijoleghost

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,833
Hands down---B.B. King, opening for the Who and Jefferson Airplane at Tanglewood (Mass.), summer 1969.
I was there on a summer camp outing. The first few notes from B.B. King (he opened then with "Don't
Answer the Door") and I was absolutely staggered, I couldn't believe someone could make a guitar sound
like that. I was so hooked on him that I didn't want to know from the Who or the Airplane, both of
whom I loved. And I couldn't wait to get home from camp, get back to the cheap electric guitar my
maternal grandmother bought me as a gift two birthdays previous, and start teaching myself to play
a guitar seriously. (Not to mention get my mitts on the allowance my mother was saving for me all
summer long and buy as many blues records as the money and my fourteen-year-old arms could carry
out of the store!)

To this day I don't live a day without hearing B.B. King at least once.
hey, i saw BB that same summer at fillmore west!
 




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