Favorite Lineup of Bands who Changed Members

M. Shoop

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131
I really liked Dr Feelgood from Day One, but I much preferred them after Wilco Johnson left and John Mayo joined.
 

gretschplayer

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426
Also, it turns out that Nico was the best and most enthusiastic bus driver for the few tours she did with them!




How this never became a Smiths or Belle and Sebastian album cover is frankly beyond me.
I remember seeing that in the "Up-Tight" book and it just cracked me up and blew my mind. They also said she didn't even have a driver's license. :D
 

wombat66

Member
Messages
3,069
I need to go all contrary on a few of these

Flamin Groovies when it was Cyril Jordan ,George Alexander, Chris Wilson ,Mike Wilhelm and David Wright
The Flamin Groovies with Roy Loney and Danny Mihm (both of whom passed away during the last 12 months) and Cyril and George is my favorite lineup (with either Tim Lynch or James Farrell)
Zappa - Roxy and Elsewhere
The Uncle Meat Mothers!
The Velvet Underground & Nico lineup, they were groundbreaking and revolutionary.
The white light quartet (Cale, Reed, Morrison and Tucker) was the real pure band for me. As much as I loved Nico, she was just tacked on and was kind of a distraction (not that the banana LP isn't a masterpiece and may be the better record).
 

gretschplayer

Member
Messages
426
I need to go all contrary on a few of these


The Flamin Groovies with Roy Loney and Danny Mihm (both of whom passed away during the last 12 months) and Cyril and George is my favorite lineup (with either Tim Lynch or James Farrell)

The Uncle Meat Mothers!

The white light quartet (Cale, Reed, Morrison and Tucker) was the real pure band for me. As much as I loved Nico, she was just tacked on and was kind of a distraction (not that the banana LP isn't a masterpiece and may be the better record).
I agree with you in theory, but the debut album wouldn't have been the same without Nico. I do think Sister Ray is their best song, and possibly rock and roll's be-all, end-all track, but, the first album as a whole is hard to beat.
 

Fatherflot

Member
Messages
7,485
I need to go all contrary on a few of these


The Flamin Groovies with Roy Loney and Danny Mihm (both of whom passed away during the last 12 months) and Cyril and George is my favorite lineup (with either Tim Lynch or James Farrell)

The Uncle Meat Mothers!

The white light quartet (Cale, Reed, Morrison and Tucker) was the real pure band for me. As much as I loved Nico, she was just tacked on and was kind of a distraction (not that the banana LP isn't a masterpiece and may be the better record).
The first album, in my book, is miles better in terms of the songcraft. All Lou's best songs that he'd polished over years ended up there, plus an honest attempt by a whiteboy garage band to simulate "Wall of Sound" pop production.

WLWH is mostly a quickie jam album. Even the title song sounds better to me in some of the live versions, esp on VU Live 1969, where they bring out the doo wop inspiration with more reverence.

Don't get me wrong: WLWH is a landmark -- it's essentially the first "Industrial" album --- "Sister Ray" and "I Heard Her Call My Name" basically invented teh brutalz. It still amazes me that Verve released it. It's a gloriously, gratingly, shambolic, lo-fi, amphetamine-fueled freakout that has always given me the headache it was surely designed to induce.

"The Gift," however, has not aged well for me. Seems now like Lou reaching into his bag of college "macabre" humor stories for album filler. It wants to be tres drolique, but comes off as sophomoric and smug English major stuff. And a full eight minutes worth! That's studio ash-shifting, my friends. Bad enough on side 4 of a double album, but track #2 on a single LP? Speed is a hell of a drug. . .
 
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