Feeling the blues

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by drummondrs, May 24, 2005.


  1. drummondrs

    drummondrs Member

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    Well after getting funky, I turned to blues and with the help of my TIM pedal I am doing pretty well. I have been learing stuff from Eric Clapton, Danny Gatton and of course one of my favourite guitarist SRV. Have you guys got any suggestions about other sources I should look at. I already checked out Robben Ford on powertabs and there isn't much...shame.
     
  2. drjojo42

    drjojo42 Member

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    some of my favorite blues guys to emulate,#1 freddy king,love mixing minor and major,#2 jimmy thackery hes an encyclopedia of licks, at times a little to busy but empy arms hotel is full of must learn licks,kim wilson always has great players on his discs, just my opinons,good luck and let your licks breath joe
     
  3. jordanL

    jordanL Member

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    I like to start at the beginning- The 3 kings(BB, Albert and Freddy), Muddy Waters, Howlin Wolf (Hubert Sumlin on guitar), T-bone walker. All of these guys heavily influenced those who followed.
     
  4. Tom Gross

    Tom Gross Supporting Member

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    Mike Bloomfield
    Ronnie Earl
     
  5. raz

    raz Member

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    If you like SRV then you need to study:

    Buddy Guy
    Albert King
    Lonnie Mack
    Hendrix

    and Stevie's self-avowed biggest influence: Jimmie Vaughan

    If you like Clapton, you need to study:

    Freddy King
    B.B. King
    Buddy Guy
    Robert Johnson

    If you really want to feel the Blues, then you study everybody. Both SRV and Clapton drew from sources prominent and obscure and both went through mountains of records from people you've likely never heard of.

    Me, I like 'em all...and Lightnin' Hopkins, Gatemouth Brown, Mississippi John Hurt...

    R
    A
    Z
     
  6. BramhallFan

    BramhallFan Member

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    Ok now this is gonna sound dumb but please trust me and I know alot of other players will agree. Forget about going to emulating players. Listen to as much as you can. Magic sam, Otis Rush, Hubert Sumlin, BB King, Robert Cray etc... If I were you I would stay away from the lightening bolters ie Trower, Ford, Tyler, Shepherd... They tend to let the Feeling slip through the cracks. Feel is the best part. Find a player you can feel and listen to what hes doin and most importantly find your own way of playing it. Chasing down Stevies fingers will do nothing but dissappoint you.

    Sorry If I offended anyone.
     
  7. Tom Gross

    Tom Gross Supporting Member

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    How 'bout this -

    Everyone always says "find your own voice", well, how about "find your own way of listening"?

    The blues landscape stretches far and wide, with rural, rock, jazz, old women singers, Mississipi, Chicago, Texas, fast, slow, black, white, everything.

    I'd suggest getting some of those blues compilations, a bunch of them, they're real cheap. Then go on amazon or another site with sound samples, and follow the "similar artists" and "influenced by" links and the lists on the side of the page.

    Then listen to it all and see what speaks to you.

    I was raised on the blues, grew up surrounded by it. But I did what I described, and discovered a whole bunch of great stuff.

    An added bonus is that later you have stuff to rediscover.
     
  8. BramhallFan

    BramhallFan Member

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    You see I love it when people are on the same page. Tom is Right he just took my thought to a more wide and all around level. Great idea about the comps.

    Btw I saw Robert Cray in NYC last night.. Holy Crap such soul and feelin...

    Hes the man

    Tommy
     
  9. sanhozay

    sanhozay klon free since 2009

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    I don't know your level but if you want to learn to march then pull out and PLAY with your Jimmy Reed records.

    And playing hot licks ain't worth shinola if you can't comp behind Little Walter and Sonny Boy Williams.

    Personally, there's not much too it if you can learn to bend, vibrato and sing like BB ;)
     
  10. axwielding1

    axwielding1 Guest

    I play alot of SRV, Jimi,Clapton etc. .. Not as good as them by any means, but my interpretation of them. I cop some licks here and there, but I put them together differently. I will say that my feel is more of the SRV style, as I played in a 3 piece for a long time, and had to fill alot with rakes, trills, and bends. I stumbled upon SRV early, but was more into metal/hard rock at the time. When the 3 piece split, I floundered for awhile, and listened to SRV alot. What a great guitarist, what hands..That influence dragged me into the blues, and I followed. I went backwards through the artists, and have found alot of great players. Albert Collins, Lonnie Mack, T Bone Walker, along with the obvious listed in above threads.
    I've recently hooked up with some guys to explore more blues influences, and the other guitarist, a strat player, is an un-schooled phenom! When he gets hooked up, watch out, he'll leave you in the dust. His father was a musician as well, and this kid grew up with the blues. His father could play any instrument, but preferred the clarinet. What a way to grow up.. Pretty cool!
    His father is gone now, but his influence on his son still shines through. When we play together, we come from two different places, but mesh perfectly. Glad to get with these guys and jam through some old tunes.
    ax.:cool:
     
  11. pbradt

    pbradt Senior Member

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    This is the correct blues guitarist.

    Trying to sound like anyone but yourself is a loser's game on a number of levels. First, you CAN'T. Look at the legions of SRV clones. THEY ALL SUCK! In addition, anyone with a lick of sense is SO SICK of guitar players who try (and fail) to sound like SRV and others that it makes heads explode to hear of another person trying (and failing).

    Second, if all you do is chase another's sound, we are cheated out of the music that's inside YOU. SRV has been here and done it better than you can. Be the best YOU you can be, and we're all the better for it.
     
  12. axwielding1

    axwielding1 Guest

    There is no way to get the same tone as SRV, or any other guitarist, great or not so great...
    If you want to play SRV, play YOUR version, we know who SRV is, who the hell are you?
    I take their influences, shake 'em up, and roll the bones.....
    AMEN brother!!
    ax.:cool:
     
  13. i'm sorry but playing blues like SRV ford or any of those guys, is figuring out their signiture. Be it vibrato sliding or bending. The stuff is about technique not feeling. If you want to learn the blues relatively quickly then learn the technique. "soul" is non existant. Hearing what to play in a blues context is easy to hear what to play over which is what people interpret as feel. I'm sorry but blues is a dead horse that is being beaten to death. Learn some new stuff for crying out loud. If I hear another **** SRVaughnabee i think i'll puke. I listen to stevie for his authenticity, And when i hear a million crap players trying to do EXACTLY the same thing but without the tone, vibrato, and utter discretion of stevie or anyone else it just doesnt sound like stevie at all. so for christ's sakes people learn more than that!
     
  14. davetcan

    davetcan Supporting Member

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  15. Mark C

    Mark C Member

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    Listen to whatever you want, borrow from whomever you want, practice a lot and have fun. No one has all the right answers, so even if the world doesn't want to hear another SRV clone - if that's how you want to play, have fun. I would however make one suggestion as a fairly accomplished player. Ditch the powertabs and start figuring out licks by ear - that's how all the greats did it and it will make you a much better player. Also make sure you always know which chords you are playing over and practice playing blues rhythms, since no one but you wants to hear you solo all night long. Good luck.
     
  16. lhallam

    lhallam Member

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    +1

    I've known some players who could only play lead. They are playing only 1/2 a guitar and not much fun to play with.
     
  17. Tom Gross

    Tom Gross Supporting Member

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    ++1

    Although I never play that way these days, I'm sure glad I didn't skip going thru an SRV phase, or that of copying any of the whole bunch of folks who inspired me.
    They're all in there in the mix somewhere, in the soup that is my music.
     
  18. mardin

    mardin Guest

    I listen to the blues players mentioned in the thread but the one I like the most was not mentioned: Jorma Kaukonen. A finger-picked acoustic style develops sound blues licks and what Jorma recorded with Hot Tuna is awesome.
     
  19. Leucadian

    Leucadian Guest

    I learned a lot of different grooves, rhythms, turnarounds licks etc. from the first three Fabulous Thunderbirds albums...also there's a young guy named Kirk Fletcher who's really souful...check it his "Shades of Blue" for Chicago and Texas style blues. Fletcher is also on an album with the Hollywood Blue Flames that's got lots of swingin' jump blues...Fletcher is very versatile. The new Ronnie Earl/Duke Robillard album is great too.
     
  20. tommyg

    tommyg Member

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    +++1

    I was into SRV when he first came out in the '80's. I liked his style but I NEVER tried to emulate him. Same with Ford. There seems to be a lot of people trying to emulate the "vibe" of their favorite players. It seems to me by reading a lot of these posts the two most popular vibes right now are to emulate SRV's and Robben Ford's tone. But remember; just because you have the same toys doesn't mean you have the same heart! Besides - what's the sense on being an SRV or Robben Ford clone? They're originals and have developed their styles over years of playing. Just by having their gear and knowing their licks turns you into nothing more than a wannabee. You might as well play in a tribute band. BE YOURSELF! Develop your own style! What I have done over the years was listen to as MANY players as I could from various idioms (blues, rock, jazz, etc.) and I took (aka "stole") the best parts from them and added them to my reportoire. It could have been anything; choice of scales, tone, bends, vibrato, whammy technique, slide, etc. Same with your choice of gear. My amp and guitars of choice are because they sounded good to me and gave me what I wanted in terms of my OWN tone.

    Anyway, I believe once you have done this you'll start to notice that you'll slowly start to sound like....YOU!;)

    Good Luck!:)
     

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