fender deluxe vs super question

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by batfish, Mar 20, 2015.

  1. batfish

    batfish Member

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    Hi All,

    Suppose I'm playing classic, southern rock with a Les Paul at small clubs, 50-200 people. Assume the amps can be mic'd for front of house.

    Do I want the Super Reverb or the Deluxe Reverb?

    To my ear, with a Les Paul, the super has a richer clean tone, but that could be my imagination because I'm just hearing what I expected to hear (because I know the super has more power, bigger tubes, etc). Does it actually have a richer sound to it?

    Second, assuming I want, at stage volume, my guitar tone to be clean and clear, but just starting to get some sustain and compression but plenty of volume headroom remaining. Again, playing rock with a drummer and 2nd guitar player at small club volume. I think the Deluxe would be about right here, but the super might have a bigger sound, but would I be fighting overwhelming the stage volume with the SR?

    I've played the deluxe but only at very low volume at a guitar store. It's hard to know how somethings going to sound until you play it with a band!

    I don't care how heavy the super is and I don't care which sounds better in my living room, just which will sound better in a rock band mix for rehearsals and small, indoor shows.

    Do I want the deluxe or the super? Thanks!
     
  2. mxvin

    mxvin Member

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    SR...60 pounds of pure wonderful tone.
    DR...35/40 pounds of great tone but different.
    I have a both but my DR has a very efficient EVM-12L speaker and I have it set up to be as clean as it can with in the confines of the circuit.
    Both will get the job done. The DR is so much easier to move around though for gigging.
     
  3. swiveltung

    swiveltung Member

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    I'm thinking neither. SR probably too loud to get in the zone, DR may give it up too early with a packed house.
    I'm thinking Vibrolux or DR modified for 6L6's.... I do use a DR though on a lot of similar gigs... but few are 200 person clubs. Some clubs it seems to sound nasty... just due to the volume of the club.. as it does at outside gigs too.
     
  4. Muzzy

    Muzzy Supporting Member

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    I vote for the Vibrolux too. It's ideal for what you're looking for.
     
  5. batfish

    batfish Member

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    Thanks guys, they don't make a blackface vibrolux anymore, do they? I guess I could look around for a used one. They do have that '68 Custom vibrolux and I admit, it sounds good on the demos I've been watching, but the TGP.net in me can't get over the 30 dollar speakers, lol. I should give one a try, though, sounds like a good 'middle ground' and some of the features on that '68 custom could be useful, though I wonder if they voiced that whole series for sounding good at low volume vs. in a band (i.e. they tout the early breakup, etc)
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2015
  6. DeaconBlues

    DeaconBlues Member

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    Yep, '68 custom Vibrolux.
     
  7. stevel

    stevel Member

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    The 68s have a "blackface" side and a "bassman" side, so you do get that as opposed to just having "the same sound twice" in the typical blackfaces (DR and SR). Plus since reverb is available on both channels, they're both useable to the same degree if you use the amp reverb

    The real answer is though, it totally depends on how much work the amp is doing without the pedals.

    Super Reverbs are glorious. Sublime even. 4x10s fill the air with sound in a way that a single speaker or even a pair of speakers can.

    But yes, if you want to try to crank it to get "that tone" out of the amp, it's going to be too loud for all but giant stages (not that many musicians care though unfortunately, but your ears eventually will).

    I used one for years, but because it was loud enough on stage and still clean enough to be clean at that volume. Then I got my gain from pedals.

    A Deluxe - I could never use one on any stage where I needed any stage volume becuase they don't stay clean enough up the dial for me. In a style of music where that didn't matter, it wouldn't be a big deal to me. But since I mostly play covers, having a loud clean is as important as having a controlled gain sound. If I were playing in ears and stage volume wasn't an issue, any small amp would do. Get the tone you want going into the mic at whatever volume it worked at and you'd be golden.

    But most small gigging situations mean you often don't even put your amp in the monitors (don't need any more stage volume!) and sometimes you're even carrying the room with your amp, at least in part (which shouldn't be done in most "rock" bands - and you are mic'ing it - but again it's sometimes a necessary evil).

    Fender is pretty good about making "band level" amps IMHO. Even the Pro Jr and Hot Rod Deluxe don't really come into their own until you play them at "band volume".

    I think what they're trying to do now is make the bigger amps sound good not only at gig volume, but at lower volumes as well, whereas in the past it was more of a "use the small one at home and the big one at the gig" kind of deal.

    My experience over the years was that there would always be some instance where I couldn't run the amp in "it's sweet spot". In every room, it would be either too loud or too quiet - and turning it down or up wasn't practical. So instead I went with too much power but keep it low, so the sound the amp is more consistent over the travel of the dial (say from 2.5 to 4 instead of running an amp on 6 or 7 or 11). That way my tone doesn't change drastically if I'm forced to turn the amp up or down. This way my channel volume is more like a Master volume. If I took my Pro Jr to a gig though, there are no cleans at the volume I need to run it, and once it gets to about 7 on the dial (goes to 12) which is a good gigging volume for a loud rock band, it won't get any louder - it only gets grindier - which isn't a bad thing, but if you need more stage volume, you simply don't have it - and in fact the grindier sounds don't cut through as well so turning it up after a certain point works against you!!!

    If you can find one that does "the tone" at the right volume, and you can leave it from gig to gig, great. You'd probably have to go through quite a few though. At least Fender does make enough size ranges where that's an option.
     
  8. swiveltung

    swiveltung Member

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    Oh......... I thought you were talking vintage amps. I vote neither....!
     
  9. batfish

    batfish Member

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    Steve, thanks for taking the time to write all that out, I really appreciate the advice. As you can guess, I'm pretty new to playing shows, and getting the rightsized rig has been a learning experience.

    As far as new vs. vintage, I probably don't have the budget for a vintage amp, but I would definitely consider one if the price was right. I'm probably looking at a used reissue, which aren't too much money.
     
  10. sixty2strat

    sixty2strat Member

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    Got to say as a 4 hole marshall guy fenders are not my thing. I own a few still and the 2 I've come to love the most are a 67 Super and a 66 BF Bassman in a a 1x12 combo. I'd look at the SR or a BF basmman. Also super cheap is the SF Bandmaster reverb head. The 70's rock guys are not as overdriven as many guys think IMO. So with the right speakers these amps can work very well at a sane volume. Just like they did then use a fuzz or boost pedal as needed.
     
  11. SupremeDalek

    SupremeDalek Member

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    An early SF Super (68) can be had for less than the RI models at GC.

    If you get a vintage Super, get speakers as close to stock as possible. When I'm jamming, my amp is right on the verge of breakup with the stock, low watt speakers. The amp has the volume around 5 and the guitar (SG) is turned down a bit.

    Or...if you want "cleaner, longer" you could opt for more efficient speakers.
     

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