Fender necks - "rosewood slab" versus?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Tone Loco, Feb 24, 2009.

  1. Tone Loco

    Tone Loco Silver Supporting Member

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    I've seen ads for a couple of Strats where they say this one has a "rosewood slab neck". Now if its a rosewood neck guitar what else would it be? Are there fretboards that are made of multiple pieces of rosewood glued together? Or does it mean that its thicker than some, or what? Not being a Fender guy I'd have assumed that all the rosewood fretboards were basically the same, although I'm sure the quality of the rosewood could have major differences.

    Now that I think of it though, I remember borrowing a tele from a guy in the 70s and thinking that it looked like the fretboard was curved in the same radius as the neck. Like it was the same thickness at any point not flat on the back of it where it was glued on, more like a cap laid over a rounded neck than a slab glued onto a flat neck.... hard to describe. And maybe not right to begin with?:messedup

    Anyhow I'd appreciate hearing what exactly makes something a rosewood slab as opposed to just a rosewood fretboard.
     
  2. DGDGBD

    DGDGBD Member

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    It differs from the version which used a thinner veneer-like thickness of rosewood glued to the curved maple neck.
     
  3. E Baxter Put

    E Baxter Put Member

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    Here's a pic. Slab on the left, veneer on the right.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Tone Loco

    Tone Loco Silver Supporting Member

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    Wow, I guess that picture clears that right up! Thanks.

    Is one or the other associated with any particular time frame? Pretty sure the tele I saw with the non slab was whatever was current in about '73. Did Fender start with slabs and go to the thinner one after being bought out or did they always do it both ways or what? Thanks for the education BTW :AOK
     
  5. Gas-man

    Gas-man Unrepentant Massaganist

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    A related question: why do people always say "neck" when they mean "fingerboard".
     
  6. dazco

    dazco Member

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    Correct me if i'm wrong, and i may be. But the slab started with the first rosewood models in what, about 60? Then they went to the veneer type like the right one in the pic sometime in the mid to later 60's, probably when CBS took over in i think '65. And i don't think they went back to slabs till the first reissues in the early 80's. like i said i may be wrong, but i think thats close.
     
  7. dazco

    dazco Member

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    To confuse you.:D
     
  8. gkoelling

    gkoelling Member

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    Because it's easier than fingerboard and everyone knows what it means anyway. No big deal, really.

    Actually, if we want to get real technical it's a fret board, not a finger board. There are no fingers on it but it has at least 21 frets.
     
  9. 84Bravo

    84Bravo Member

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    There is a difference in construction, and, a difference in tone. Slab boards tend to be darker than lam boards generally--not always, don't start yellin' at me.
     
  10. Drew816

    Drew816 Supporting Member

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    I would agree, this isn't always the case but all things being equal a Slab-board or thicker rosewood board is going to tone things down a bit more. Personally I prefer more rosewood and thicker boards but they're tough to come by. I have a Charvel Strathead that has a mega thick rosewood board, 1 5/8 nut width and the perfect profile (for me) and it sounds amazing; to me anyway. I had a Jackson Strathead neck that was the same way, only 1 11/16th nut width so I sold that guitar off and have regreted that sale ever since...

    Happy Playing!
     
  11. 83stratman

    83stratman Supporting Member

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    The lam board on Strats appeared in mid to late '62, IIRC.
     
  12. RickC

    RickC Gold Supporting Member

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    +1

    In fact, when Fender first started doing vintage re-issues in the early 80's, they specifically chose a "62 re-issue" designation for the rosewood board Strats so that they could change to lam board if desired and still be historically accurate.

    /rick
     
  13. 83stratman

    83stratman Supporting Member

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    Yep, that's what I have always understood as well.

     
  14. buddastrat

    buddastrat Member

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    That's weird, my 06FEB66 strat neck has a veneer like on the right.
     
  15. zombiwoof

    zombiwoof Supporting Member

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    My '66 Electric XII also has a lam board neck, they probably didn't change back until later in the sixties.

    Al
     
  16. jaevee14

    jaevee14 Member

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    Every now and then a neck after '62 will turn up with a slab. I don't know if there is any rhyme or reason to it. I recently saw a slab rosewood board on a Mustang neck from the late sixties. Mustangs didn't go into production until '64 so you would figure that all of the boards would be veneer.
     
  17. E Baxter Put

    E Baxter Put Member

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    They did both slab and veneer necks during the 60s. If you look at Jaguar and Mustang necks you will find both veneer and slab necks during the same years. I think it's much easier to make slab necks.

    I've heard that if they screwed up a veneer neck they could just sand it flat and make it a slab neck. I'm not sure what the real story is though.
     

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