Fight of The Best Dumble Clones! Quinn vs Louis Electrics Cobra!

Tag

Platinum Supporting Member
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40,320
I think the guitar mix is better in this one, but I like the reverb in the first one.

That's just personal taste though.
Thanks Blues! I dig the verb too. :beer

And I just played the Cobra Lou adjusted.
Somebody else has a killer amp coming!!
:banana:banana:banana
 

Tag

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
40,320
I think the guitar mix is better in this one, but I like the reverb in the first one.

That's just personal taste though.
By the way....I just ordered a new Dell computer that should really rock with Reaper and for my recordings for years to come! Should be here in 10 days. You guys were 100% right on it being worth making the switch. The recordings sound so unreal through my Yamaha monitors I cant believe it!
:)

I understand now that the clips play MUCH louder on soundcloud than on my computer, so I have to mix at lower volumes.
This is fun! :facepalm
 

Tag

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
40,320
I think the guitar mix is better in this one, but I like the reverb in the first one.

That's just personal taste though.
One more thing too....did you listen to the playing all the way through in that Benson tune I posted?? I have been saying for 20 years I was going to learn that solo note for note. Thats what I'm doing now. Unbelievable playing. You want to see what sets him apart from Sco, Metheny, Stern etc etc, just learn that solo. He plays changes when he wants and hears them. The notes TOTALLY do not work with the chords underneath in places, yet they fit perfect. The man is on a different level. And when he plays blues and pent licks, he makes EVERY change. Its maddening. No one shreds the changes to pieces like Benson. He plays totally by ear, what he wants, when he wants. The chords do not limit him, they are the loosest guides to what he plays. Do yourself a favor and transcribe some of it. Unless you know your theory really well though, it will be very hard to figure out how parts work.
The man is unbelievable.........
He definitely needs a Cobra.
:banana :banana :banana :banana :banana
 

Bluesful

Silver Supporting Member
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38,936
One more thing too....did you listen to the playing all the way through in that Benson tune I posted?? I have been saying for 20 years I was going to learn that solo note for note.
I did.

I didn't realise it was a Benson solo note-for-note.
 

8nthatK

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,175
OR... you could do what George does and learn to visualize chord progressions and substitutions to the nth degree and not worry about theory whatsoever. Arps over every possible chord and substitution possibilities (whether those chords are currently being articulated or not) with some chromatics and you're done. :D

Easy Peasy... :rotflmao

Of course, he does like playing ∆7's a step down and over 7's...and...and... :p


Unless you know your theory really well though, it will be very hard to figure out how parts work.
 

Tag

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
40,320
OR... you could do what George does and learn to visualize chord progressions and substitutions to the nth degree and not worry about theory whatsoever. Arps over every possible chord and substitution possibilities (whether those chords are currently being articulated or not) with some chromatics and you're done. :D

Easy Peasy... :rotflmao

Of course, he does like playing ∆7's a step down and over 7's...and...and... :p

The advantage of knowing the theory is you understand how to use it yourself (I know you understand this Kern!) Example...Someone can learn that entire solo note for note, play it perfectly, and other than what they understand, not be able to use any of it in a coherent way. George plays F-6 lines over G-7 here for instance. That can really mess you up if you do not understand V-1s and relative 7th and minor 7th relationships! I use to transcribe his solos and would get totally lost. You can do more harm than good sometimes!!
 

8nthatK

Silver Supporting Member
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3,175
Oh, I'm not arguing against theory at all. I'm merely pointing out that's not the way George plays the way he does. :D

There is nothing more important than learning to see (hear) everything in a chordal context rather than scales, patterns etc.
I wish I could have a do over there... If I can 'see' every option I have on any given chord (approaches, substitutions, etc), harmonic and melodic, I don't care about theory one iota in that moment. The only value of theory at that point is in explaining the methodology.
I don't want to think 'I can play a harmonic minor arp over this V7'...I want to be able to visualize and hear those options in real time.

Anyway, sorry for the derail.
:beer
 

The Pup

No Complexity Without Value
Silver Supporting Member
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3,639
When purely improvising, I do not attemp to understand why something I am playing might [subjectively] sound "good."

I am really just along for the ride (outwardly looking in).

Specialized knowledge provides a language to communicate among the learned.

In this case, I am without a tongue to speak.
 

Tag

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
40,320
Oh, I'm not arguing against theory at all. I'm merely pointing out that's not the way George plays the way he does. :D

There is nothing more important than learning to see (hear) everything in a chordal context rather than scales, patterns etc.
I wish I could have a do over there... If I can 'see' every option I have on any given chord (approaches, substitutions, etc), harmonic and melodic, I don't care about theory one iota in that moment. The only value of theory at that point is in explaining the methodology.
I don't want to think 'I can play a harmonic minor arp over this V7'...I want to be able to visualize and hear those options in real time.

Anyway, sorry for the derail.
:beer
Exactly. But for many of us mere mortals you have to learn that in your head first, then mechanically apply it for a while before it comes out naturally!
His playing F-6 lines over the G-7 were in anticipation of the upcoming Bb7 chord for example. I hear that naturally now and do it all the time for that reason. But I was taught that years ago, and it took me a few years of forcing it in (and sounding bad) to beat it into my memory for it to come out correctly now. No different than playing a pentatonic lick.....
And those guys learned it the same way from other people, all the way back to Charlie Parker. Lol! Its amazing that even today, most things you hear in jazz go straight back to Parker and Coltrane. It seems the different personalities are based on how much of each you mix together. Benson learned to hear that stuff from his favorite players doing it, and the monsters he played with showing him!!
 

Tag

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
40,320
When purely improvising, I do not attemp to understand why something I am playing might [subjectively] sound "good."

I am really just along for the ride (outwardly looking in).

Specialized knowledge provides a language to communicate among the learned.

In this case, I am without a tongue to speak.
For me, learning to improvise required knowing exactly what I was doing. I collected melodies, licks, riffs, lines and noises I liked and beat them into my subconscious along with whatever else was already there. Now its drawing from that vocabulary when I improvise. Its exactly like learning words and phrases in a language and then speaking. You draw from your vocabulary to get out what you want to say on the topic at hand. Exactly how I am writing this now.
:)

That is only how I do it, and it may or may not apply to anyone else!!!
 

willie k

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,223
Wow, you guys know stuff. I just ask the bass player what key we’re in, and start noodling. Wish I’d actually learned more back in the day. Kind of hard for this old dog to learn new tricks. It often takes a new gear purchase to make me play. I came to the realization I am just bored with my noodling. My focus now is on playing with a lighter touch in anticipation of Cobra time. For me that is a considerable challenge.
 

RAG7890

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,288
I have to admit, watching RF on his Instagram page has been an eye opener...............picking up some good information. :aok

Just thought I'd throw that in since I previously said I'm not really a fan.

:beer
 

The Pup

No Complexity Without Value
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,639
For me, learning to improvise required knowing exactly what I was doing. I collected melodies, licks, riffs, lines and noises I liked and beat them into my subconscious along with whatever else was already there. Now its drawing from that vocabulary when I improvise. Its exactly like learning words and phrases in a language and then speaking. You draw from your vocabulary to get out what you want to say on the topic at hand. Exactly how I am writing this now.
:)

That is only how I do it, and it may or may not apply to anyone else!!!
With respect to music, enjoyment [perhaps even fulfillment] is multi-faceted.

You have a depth of [applied] understanding I will never know.
 
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Tag

Platinum Supporting Member
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40,320
With respect to music, enjoyment [perhaps even fulfillment] is multi-faceted.

You have a depth of [applied] understanding I will never know.
Well, you could learn everything I know if you wanted. But enjoyment in music, or almost anything, is specific to the person for sure! My number 1 goal is to be a strong improviser. Pretty much always has been. Someone else may want to write songs. Another may want to play cover songs perfectly etc etc. Its endless!!
:beer
 




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