firewood questions

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by neastguy, Apr 13, 2015.

  1. neastguy

    neastguy Supporting Member

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    I'm no outdoors man... yes I know .. sacrilege on TGP.. anyhow.. I was thinking about getting a fire pit for the backyard of our new house... we have a big field behind us but no trees.. ect...

    anyhow.. if I just want to use it a couple times a month .. maybe 3 for a couple hours at a clip tops.. maybe just cook some hotdogs over the flame with the kids..ect.. how much wood will I need each time and is it worth the hassle to find a place to store it? I don't want to have to deal with finding a big ol pile of wood...
    :bitch
    yes..
     
  2. DYNA BILL

    DYNA BILL Member

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    You could go to your local large supermarket or home supply store. They usually sell bundles of firewood for the occasional user.
     
  3. lefort_1

    lefort_1 Nuzzled Firmly Betwixt Gold Supporting Member

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    Around here, lots of people sell 1/3 cords.
    If you buy them now (when cut green/heavy sap) you'll get them for about half off...and they would be burnable (not fully seasoned) by fall.
    For a short fire, you might want to look into a softwood like fir, cedar or pine.
    They won't last as long and you won't be worried about oak or black locust logs burning until the next dawn.


    Also, I've got 3 dead doug firs I need to drop.
    My neighbors have 5 or 6.
    "drought die-off" sez the state forester.
    When I drop them, you're welcome to drop by with a chainsaw.
     
  4. hellbender

    hellbender Member

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    Be prepared to have to drain it and clean the mucky ash out each time it rains. Gets old quick.
     
  5. neastguy

    neastguy Supporting Member

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    :omg

    screw the fire then.. I don't want a mess just to eat more carcinogens
     
  6. Bobby Wasabi

    Bobby Wasabi Member

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    How about just get a cover for it?
     
  7. Snare227

    Snare227 Vendor

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    Any parks around close? I know in WV we have a few invasive insects and camp grounds are really promoting buying your firewood at their park instead of hauling in your own (which transplants the insects to new areas). That would be an easy place to get a bundle every now and then. If you don't have proper storage for a larger load. Also, if it is just going to be an occasional thing, I wouldn't go for a permanent structure or a "pit". I'd just pick up a small metal one on a stand or a "chimnea" at Lowes. Then you can just have your fire time and let it go out overnight and just dump the ashes in the morning and store it in a shed or garage. One less thing to mow and weedeat around as well.
     
  8. swiveltung

    swiveltung Member

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    You want wood that is at least 6 months cut. That will be dry enough to burn well. You need some kindling to start the fire (cedar etc) but I find small fireplace logs work well for this. Store your wood covered to keep dry in the rainy or winter season. Have fun, having a fire is great. You'll probably want 10-12 chunks of wood for each fire for a 1.5-2hour fire or so.
     
  9. Ulug

    Ulug Member

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    And some guitar stores carry lots of it too... :p
     
  10. mike6m

    mike6m Supporting Member

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    My firepit is a premade one and it came with a cover. I have some wooded areas on my property and I collect sticks when I mow the yard and throw them in the pit waiting for the next firepit evening. I always keep it covered, but just as any wood burning fireplace, you will have to clean out the old ashes from time to time. Keeping the firewood covered is good to keep it dry too.
     
  11. greenhilander

    greenhilander Member

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    Get one with a chimney. I have one with a chimney and its great.
     
  12. neastguy

    neastguy Supporting Member

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    what you talking about willis?

    this is starting to seem like a lot of work for some fun fire with the family
     
  13. DYNA BILL

    DYNA BILL Member

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    It's TGP. We tend to overthink things.:bonk
     
  14. greenhilander

    greenhilander Member

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    I purchased an outdoor fire place. It has a chimney. Just like the old brick ones only this is metal. I've had it for 8 years. I had to put 1 coat of paint on it last year. Its great.


    http://www.lowes.com/pd_597372-5925...epits&pl=1&currentURL=?Ntt=firepits&facetInfo=

    Like this one.
     
  15. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    Might be just as well.

    You guys in Ohio have some serious issues with insects, which are ravaging your ash trees, other trees and you don't want to be moving around wood especially if you can't spot these insects.

    Buy wood at the Grocery on a very few occasions; cleanup doesn't get old unless you do it all the time.
     
  16. bullfrogblues

    bullfrogblues Supporting Member

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    We built this one in 2012 and have been enjoying fires a lot. Not so much in the hot summer, but I dug out the pit rather deep and filled it with stones. so it drains easily.
    [​IMG]
     
  17. music321

    music321 Member

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    A fire pit is as much work as you want it to be. As for it working, the biggest factor is having wood that has had sufficient time to dry, not just a few months. It sounds like this isn't really up your alley, so you might find the whole thing to be a drag. Fire provides great ambiance, but it can be done very simply. An ex girlfriend had a fireplace that we used, but never with wood. We simply put a candelabra in it. It was just as nice as a fire, but much less work. A propane fire pit or a few decorative lanterns might be the way to go. As for cooking stuff, a Chinese Pu Pu Platter burner is all that the kids would need.
     
  18. marcuslom

    marcuslom Member

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    Unless you have access to applewood or such, food will tast better if you cook using charcoal. I have plenty of firewood, mostly maple, but I use it only to start the fire and then add charcoal.
     
  19. Irreverent

    Irreverent Member

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    NOT if you want to cook on it. Conifers/evergreens are not, for the most part, useful for cooking.

    I will respectfully disagree. Many hardwoods, especially oak, hickory, cherry, and yes, maple, are fine to cook over.

    Peace.
     
  20. 84superchamp

    84superchamp Silver Supporting Member

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    there are usually ads in the paper for firewood and it is nice if you have a dry place to keep it, even in a stack covered with a tarp or something similar. a cover for the pit to keep out moisture and you're all set.
    i love those summertime fires in the back yard. the kids love em too.
     

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