FIRST album that actually changed you?

Bluedano1

Member
Messages
7,565
I owned a few albums as a 10 year old in the '60's ( gifts from my older sisters) that would turn out to be huge Rock Classics- (Cream Disraeli Gears, The Doors Strange Days, as examples.

But it was my getting The Allman Brothers at Fillmore East ( in 1976, long after Duane) that was my real, transformational (?) mind-blower.

How a band could lock-in so strongly and jam for so long on one song; the improvisational yet epic guitar solos of Duane and Dickey- and the sounds they got! It was ( IS!) intensity like nothing I'd ever heard.
 

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Beyer260

Member
Messages
530
Led Zeppelin - Physical Graffiti (Deluxe CD Edition) - Music


I found this in my Dad's collection when I was a kid and first starting to get into music. On "Down By The Seaside", the guitar is run through a Leslie cabinet for a swirling, "underwater" sound. I couldn't get that sound out of my head and wanted to know how Page made his guitar sound like that. I'd never really thought about how records were made before, and this was when I started listening critically to music, hearing how all the parts worked together.
 

weedzzz

Member
Messages
455
The Strokes - Is This It?

I was pretty much still a kid, I was a bit young for the Britpop scene here in the UK but I liked the music. The little wave just after Britpops peak was bands like Travis and Coldplay who were ok but not the kind of bands you look at and find the epitome of cool when you’re a kid.

Then a year or two later The Strokes arrived, although they weren’t a UK band, they we’re signed to rough trade and had initial success here. Finally it was a band with music I loved, made me wanna turn up my amp, change the way I wanna dress etc. as an impressionable kid, that changed the course of what music I loved, wanted to be in a band etc..
 

stutter chugg

Member
Messages
529
Pink Floyd - The Wall
I became a huge Floyd fan around 10. Few years later, another album from outside my wheelhouse also made a pretty big dent.

 

gonzoknife

Member
Messages
769
Rush - Moving Pictures

I was 10ish. I remember an older girl playing it while we talked to her through her window. Something about that sound hit me and it was all I could think about.

That kicked off a lifelong love of Rush. I started collecting all their albums (thank you Columbia House!). First saw them live at 14 and then consistently for the rest of their career including the final show. I wanted to be Alex so I learned guitar. That lead to a degree in classical guitar.

Geddy, Alex and Neil provided the soundtrack to a large part of my life.

 

shoule79

Member
Messages
431
This one, right here. Before it I was a mix of hard rock and 80's new wave stuff, with a bit of college rock thrown in. Underground music was not part of my vocabulary when this album was released and I heard Smell's like teen spirit on the radio for the first time.
NirvanaNevermindalbumcover.jpg


It also led me to a lot of other albums that changed me even further, but this was the first big one.
 

MuzicToyz

Member
Messages
448
Machine Head - Deep Purple. I still remember listening to Smoke on the Water on the radio when it first came out thinking "that band has to have like 20 guitar players". It was the hook that got me interested. Kiss Alive 1 completed the catch.
 

stomped box

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
355
Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols.

Lots of records influenced my musical development, such as it has been, or at leasts tastes and sensibilities (Some Girls, Murmur, Too Far to Care, Tim) but nothing ever bent my spine like Never Mind the Bollocks. I was a standard issue yard ape 70s rock potential baby metalhead at that point, circa 1980. I'd heard OF it, but not heard it until a much cooler friend played it for me. Nothing has ever sounded as new and raw as Holidays in the Sun, and it still lights my nerves up. I borrowed his copy, rode the bus home feeling like I was holding like seven pounds of smack in my lap, real contraband in my midwest shithole.

That record diverted my path and opened me up to things outside the force-fed.
 

Mr. Fret

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
346
I owned a few albums as a 10 year old in the '60's ( gifts from my older sisters) that would turn out to be huge Rock Classics- (Cream Disraeli Gears, The Doors Strange Days, as examples.

But it was my getting The Allman Brothers at Fillmore East ( in 1976, long after Duane) that was my real, transformational (?) mind-blower.

How a band could lock-in so strongly and jam for so long on one song; the improvisational yet epic guitar solos of Duane and Dickey- and the sounds they got! It was ( IS!) intensity like nothing I'd ever heard.
Here's Brother Duane's backline!
 

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