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First gig with electric drums last night...

crambone

Member
Messages
17,977
...and it went well!

Surprisingly refreshing to be able to have all of the drums in my IEM mix.

Our drummer has always been one of those "drum by the seat of your pants" kind of guys so I was floored when he bought the kit. The guy hits HARD and I must say I was happy when he bought it but my first thought was "He is gonna HATE it".

Turns out he loves it!
 

jfranks

Member
Messages
150
Nice! I'm a big fan of those things... Which brand/model he got? Oh, and did he use the stock brain sounds or a computer?

I have a V-Drums kit, but it needs a computer+kontakt to make it sound good (and it does!!!), but I was wondering if there is a simpler solution!
 

MoPho

Pho Shizzle
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,629
I was wondering if there is a simpler solution!
I've been a v-drum user for a good 20 years. The Roland dominance is slowly being broken. Solutions are being worked on. Until then, what you use and I use (Roland + Toontrack Superior) are where it's at. The issue seems to be the ability (or willingness) to load up enough RAM to support mulitiple layers and round robin in a way to avoid hot spots. I'd also argue that a match up of a Roland and Toontrack would be a smart move since COSM still sucks. I use a converted acoustic kit with a TD-20x module and I refuse to upgrade any further with Roland until they get it right.
 

kiki_90291

Member
Messages
3,881
It doesn't surprise me at all that he likes it. I'm a former drummer who went electric in the early days (late 80's I was playing standing up on a Roland Octapad). The electric kits do two things for a drummer - first, you can finally have different sounds for different songs. Guitarists all geek out to have a variety of tones in their rig - drummers are no different. It's nice to have some variety. Second, it is fun to hit hard - while you need to be able to keep a groove even when you're playing lightly, it's nice to be able to cut loose a little. Unfortunately, acoustic drum kits don't have volume controls . . . being able to play hard an just turn it down a little is a very nice thing indeed. If they could just get the cymbals to feel better, I think they'd be perfect.
 
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wire-n-wood

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,356
I love electronic drums. Acoustic drums are too damn loud to share a small stage with. Honestly, I have no idea how drummers can put up with the sound of those acoustic cymbals crashing at arms length.
 

Marris Otter

Member
Messages
706
Both of my favorite drummers used electronic kits. They completely changed the way I wrote and they were so, so much easier on my banged up ears.
 

ant_riv

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,367
Congratulations! Great to hear it is working out well for you.

Electronic drums have come a long way, and it is mostly all good.

We started using them at rehearsal, and are planning to go to IEM (yes, we're a bit slow) and it is great to have the variety of drum sounds available AND ultimate volume control.

I expect to go Kemper, so no more stage volume issues.
 

rsm

Member
Messages
14,088
I've been looking for a local drummer that plays and is into using electronic drums for over a year (on and off)...still no luck. Let me know if he decides to move near here ;)
 

tiktok

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
22,589
I found myself in two bands this year where the drummer uses a V-drum kit most of the time. In one band, we rehearse at rental rehearsal facility where there's a PA and backline--acoustic drum kit, a couple of half stacks, a bass amp. There, the drummer always uses the provided kit. For the gigs he brings his V-drums, and we've had some of the predictable teething pains--forgotten critical cables, slow setup because he's moved the kit a half dozen times over the course of a couple of years (at most). At the shows I'd say it's generally "meh", because he goes into the PA, and we're dependent on the onstage monitor mix for 100% of the drum sound. We don't get the sort of soundchecks that allow us to really dial that in with the vocals and acoustic guitar, and so the onstage sound is often on the....weird side. But, it's not my band, so that's the gig.

In the other band, the drummer always brings a monitor, and we usually don't go through the PA at all (instrumental band), and I usually forget that it's an e-kit when I'm playing. The second guy is also a much better drummer, and has been using e-kits for a decade or more--this is his third setup. Sometimes he uses one of his acoustic kits, and those sound great, but the e-kit is the right solution for about half our gigs.
 

ripgtr

Member
Messages
8,890
Used to rehearse at the drummers house back in the 90s. He had an electronic set in his studio, he used that, we plugged guitars into the board and sang with no mics - it was loud enough. And we did a lot of 4 and 5 part harmony. He used an acoustic kit live, but it was nice rehearsing every week at a low volume. We gigged 4-5 nights a week, so it was a nice break.

Funny thing, I just hooked up with the band, the drummer plays electronic set. A traditional country band, of all things. Like, think Merle Haggard and Ray Price old. We had our first get together last week at the pedal steel players house and the drummer played HIS electronic set. So, it is getting pretty common, even in places you would not expect.
 
Messages
17,941
I'm happy with the Roland kit I bought, triggering SD2. But the cymbals, especially hi-hats, SUCK. I think I might buy actual cymbals or those Zildjian low volumes ones, and record them with mics...
 

stevel

Member
Messages
14,545
Yeah, Cymbals are usually the weak point.

But, IMHO, it's a no-brainer for a cover band, a "rock" band, or especially, a "dance" band.

I've been looking for a local drummer that plays and is into using electronic drums for over a year (on and off)...still no luck. Let me know if he decides to move near here ;)
@rsm - you have to do what the OP did - buy it yourself. Of course, that means you need to be the bandleader and hire the people too - you hire them and say, "here's the kit you're playing". Works great if you can pay good money, but if not...

Acoustic drums are too damn loud to share a small stage with. Honestly, I have no idea how drummers can put up with the sound of those acoustic cymbals crashing at arms length.
Well, the way they're played by most "dummers", yes, they are too loud. Just like the childish guitarists who insist they have to dime a 100 watt amp to get the goods. I've met more than a few drummers who were in their 30s whose ever other word was "what?" because their hearing was pretty shot.

Acoustic Drums, like an acoustic guitar, or other acoustic instruments, can be a a wonderfully expressive musical instrument. It's just too bad very, very, very few people play them that way. It doesn't help that most small bands can't afford the proper gear and don't run a PA correctly and when it comes time to leave something out of the PA, it's the kit. So naturally they have to play to "carry the room" and that means all the on-stage monitoring (be it amps or monitors) has to come up, and that means FOH has to come up... And the more players you have unmic'd, the more of a problem this is.

It's just like guitarists - "rock" players play too loud because of the same reasons (they can, they have come to believe it's the way they should play, they're unmic'd, and they're trying to hear themselves).

But play with some good musicians in a little combo trio that plays adequate but not juvenile volumes, and you've got some magic.
 
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bgood

Member
Messages
946
We've been using them at rehearsal for about a year. High end Roland kit. It's great. I got myself a DTX set since I started taking drum lessons - no way I could practice enough with just my acoustic set. They're great. Recently added Ziljian Gen16 cymbals. The Yamaha plastic cymbals sound better but these feel way better. In a mix they aren't too bad sounding and they can be dialed in way more than I have tried so far. Big improvement in feel.
 

swiveltung

Member
Messages
14,499
My drummer has an E set and never uses it. I wish he would. It would be sooo nice to be able to adjust the level. It could make a big difference at some gigs. I play a duo gig now and then with just a bassist. It's amazing the difference without drums, just a drum machine. We just set up two small mains behind us and cross them. No monitors at all.
 

giltgitguy

Member
Messages
509
As someone else said, the cymbals on an e-kit are a glaring weakness. I have used my Roland kit for a couple gigs, but with real cymbals. That was years ago, and I wouldn't do it again.

To me, there's no comparison between a real kit and an electronic kit. The subtle nuances you can get out of a real kit make it so much more musical than playing one dimensional samples. That's especially true for the cymbals. I enjoy the challenge of playing quietly on an acoustic kit. However, the Roland kit is great for being able to practice without bothering the family and neighbors.

A good drummer should be able to do more than just bash away.
 

eicca

Member
Messages
1,232
I have dreams of a hybrid kit. Real cymbals and hi-hat with electric toms, snare and kicks, and the PAs would sit where the kicks usually do so the band can still hear. I've got a killer set of tom and snare samples that were FREE TOO... I've never really liked the raw acoustic kit sound, mostly because all I hear is cheap college trash. But a mic'd and cranked drum set through a massive PA is unforgettable.
 

NamaEnsou

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,892
Used to rehearse at the drummers house back in the 90s. He had an electronic set in his studio, he used that, we plugged guitars into the board and sang with no mics...
I seldom care to use mics at practice unless it's a hard rock type of band. My friends band I've been playing with recently, they sing into mics and most songs I just sing without it, at least until the volumes start getting higher or I'm singing a quiet song.

I'm happy with the Roland kit I bought, triggering SD2. But the cymbals, especially hi-hats, SUCK...
I've always liked the combination of high quality electronic drums, paired with real cymbals. Still have yet to hear electronic cymbals that I really liked.
 

kiki_90291

Member
Messages
3,881
Has anyone tried the Zildjian Gen16 cymbals? I tried them out at a music store briefly when they first came out they seemed like a really great concept - they were dead quiet and felt like playing a real cymbal. I've never seen anyone using them in real life, though.
 




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