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Flat Response Speaker For Acoustic Guitar

Tsfrance

Member
Messages
70
I hope I am posting this in the correct place.

At the moment I have three amps. A Yamaha THR10, Boss Katana 50 and a Vox AC10. Im trying to find the best amplification for my acoustic guitar. I have a T-Rex Soulmate Acoustic Multi Effects Pedal that I use with my guitar. I have tried using the Katana to amplify it and it sounds decent when I use the acoustic channel. The acoustic channel sounds better than the aux in along with the use of the pedal. On the THR10 it sounds ok but the Katana is better. The Vox AC10 is not an option although its a snappy sound it is quite bright and even with the Soulmate I can not EQ it out. So my question is would I be better off to invest in a FR speaker to use in conjunction with the Soulmate. Im asking in general would that be a better way to amplify it? Thanks.
 

CactusWren

Member
Messages
810
Why don't you try it out with some acoustic guitar amps?

For nylon-stringed guitars, you want to go PA. I use a K10. But that's a different sound from acoustics.
 

mccreadyisgod

Member
Messages
420
If I was in your shoes, I'd look at a powered PA speaker, like the QSC K10 or K12, and then use your multi-FX pedal in front of that. You could certainly use an acoustic amp, which are very similar to a PA speaker, but with a preamp, EQ, and (possibly) some basic effects. In a pinch, a full-range bass combo amp or keyboard amp can also work, as they (like an acoustic amp) have full frequency response and a high-frequency driver.
 

Rob Taft

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,501
I use an Atomic CLR. The attached video isn't mine but it is a good comparison. Not cheap but is clear, has a flat response and can be very loud if needed.
 

JCW308

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,821
I hope I am posting this in the correct place.

At the moment I have three amps. A Yamaha THR10, Boss Katana 50 and a Vox AC10. Im trying to find the best amplification for my acoustic guitar. I have a T-Rex Soulmate Acoustic Multi Effects Pedal that I use with my guitar. I have tried using the Katana to amplify it and it sounds decent when I use the acoustic channel. The acoustic channel sounds better than the aux in along with the use of the pedal. On the THR10 it sounds ok but the Katana is better. The Vox AC10 is not an option although its a snappy sound it is quite bright and even with the Soulmate I can not EQ it out. So my question is would I be better off to invest in a FR speaker to use in conjunction with the Soulmate. Im asking in general would that be a better way to amplify it? Thanks.
You're using the wrong type of amp with your acoustic. As others have said, get a powered PA speaker or dedicated acoustic amp and you'll be in great shape. BTW, how do you like the Soulmate Acoustic?
 

SRQGuitar

Platinum Supporting Member
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,896
An acoustic amp would duplicate a lot of the functionality of Soulmate. All you need is a decent powered speaker. QSC K10 is a popular choice but I prefer the Yamaha DXR10. I use it with the Helix for acoustic guitar, resonators and mandolin.
 

Barnzy

Member
Messages
3,377
I agree that those amps will likely not meet the needs of acoustic guitar amplification even with mods or speaker swaps. I would look into bass or keyboard amps or PA gear to get a "full frequency" sound that an acoustic guitar needs. I know Peavey or Roland keyboard amps are fairly cheap on the used market and if you got a few more bucks to spend, a proper acoustic guitar amp or PA is the way to go.
 

smolder

Platinum Supporting Member
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
14,305
You're using the wrong type of amp with your acoustic. As others have said, get a powered PA speaker or dedicated acoustic amp and you'll be in great shape. BTW, how do you like the Soulmate Acoustic?
There is actually a substantial trend of playing acoustics through vintage electric guitar amps.

That said, the electric guitar amp will generate both warmth and distortion. If you want pure accurate reproduction, JCW308 is precisely right.

The most neutral, flat guitar speaker I’ve experienced was an electro voice EVM. Heavy, clean, and bland imho.
 

JCW308

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,821
There is actually a substantial trend of playing acoustics through vintage electric guitar amps.

That said, the electric guitar amp will generate both warmth and distortion. If you want pure accurate reproduction, JCW308 is precisely right.

The most neutral, flat guitar speaker I’ve experienced was an electro voice EVM. Heavy, clean, and bland imho.
EVM with the Soulmate would be incredible!
 
Messages
5,047
I guess it also depends on how much, physically, you want to be schlepping. For my preference a guitar in one hand and acoustic amp in the other means one trip from car to venue, and quick setup and break down.
 

Tim Bowen

Member
Messages
3,483
It's never discussed from this angle, but in my opinion the first variable to consider is whether your amplification is to have tweeters or not. Remember that if signal is to be fed or split to a PA, tweetage is already in the picture. Tweeters add a distinctive presence which many players find addictive. Tweeters also potentially create more sonic challenges, especially with treble-sensitive instruments such as banjos and dobros, and upper mids-sensitive unison course instruments such as mandolins and 12 string guitars. Plus, tweeters tend to fight with gain-additive devices. I can get nice sounds from high end systems that contain tweeters, surely, but I can't get them to behave in all of the ways that I need them to, unforgiving beasts that they are.

Suffice to say, tweeterless systems for me. I like the sound of the two 5” neodymium speakers in my teeny little Phil Jones AG-100 Cub 100 watt solid state amplifier. I can play any of my acoustic-electric or electric instruments through that little amp and they sound just like what they are, with no high end presence irritants. The amp is loud enough for my duo, and I'm splitting to PA anyway, but substantially more balls would be needed for working with a rhythm section. I would probably get ten or twelve of the Cub AG-100s and stack 'em like Courtney Love & Hole did with all the Ampeg Portaflexes on that TV show in the 90s. Or maybe a couple of AG-300s and some line out action. No tweetage though.
 

spence

Member
Messages
1,622
I'm with you on tweeters Tim. I hate them in acoustic amps. I use a Genzler Line Array Pro and it sounds better than any powered speaker I've tried. Yes it's expensive, but you get what you pay for.
 

Mister Natural

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,554
dunno how"flat it is - really love my Roland AC60 - great balance and terrific sounding verb & chorus
and it's indestructible !
 

BEACHBUM

Member
Messages
3,005
I like the sound through my PA but the bottom line is that since I no longer do that many gigs I got fed up hauling the head, speakers and stands around and picked up one of the original Loud Box Pros that sounded great but weighed almost as much as my Twin. Now I'm on a Katana head and extension cab and it's as good as I've heard without going into the big bucks. In fact to my ears this rig is right up there with a Martin I use to own that had the on board Aura system. The trick is to learn how to use the software and spend the time dialing it in for your particular guitar and pickup.

 
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Rod

Tone is Paramount
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
21,307
I use a 2 QSC K10’s for our acoustic trio... (and I don’t like tweeters either).. the key to getting the QSC’s, which use a woofer and a horn, to get a natural sound is to roll off high eq on the acoustic guitar mixer channel. I also use an eq on my pedalboard for further tweaking... we don’t play or sing at high volumes so I just put the K10’s in back of us on stands so we hear the same sound as the audience does... if I was using an acoustic amp, I’d find one with no tweeters
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Jim85IROC

Member
Messages
1,918
The Katana 50 should work about as well as a PA. At most, you may give up a little bit of high frequency "sparkle", but it should be otherwise fine. The Katana 50, like most modeling amps, uses a neutral sounding speaker driver and allows the digital modeling to tailor all of the sounds to emulate various speaker cabinets. The acoustic amp mode takes this into account and colors the sound similarly to what an acoustic preamp would do.

The Katana has more than enough configurable settings via the PC settings that you should be able to dial in a very pleasing acoustic tone. At the very least, you should be able to use it to figure out specifically what you don't like about it, and in doing so, you'll be much better prepared to decide what other options will best suit you.
 

Rod

Tone is Paramount
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
21,307
The Katana 50 should work about as well as a PA. At most, you may give up a little bit of high frequency "sparkle", but it should be otherwise fine. The Katana 50, like most modeling amps, uses a neutral sounding speaker driver and allows the digital modeling to tailor all of the sounds to emulate various speaker cabinets. The acoustic amp mode takes this into account and colors the sound similarly to what an acoustic preamp would do.

The Katana has more than enough configurable settings via the PC settings that you should be able to dial in a very pleasing acoustic tone. At the very least, you should be able to use it to figure out specifically what you don't like about it, and in doing so, you'll be much better prepared to decide what other options will best suit you.
Cool idea!
 




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