Flat sawn vs Quarter sawn on Fender necks. FS sounds better to me.

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Tag, Feb 8, 2020.

  1. ALLCAPSCHAP

    ALLCAPSCHAP Member

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    ONE COULD ALSO JUST PICK BOTH UP BY THE NECK AND SHOUT AT THEM REAL HARD.

    THAT IS WHAT I WOULD USUALLY DO.
     
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  2. korus

    korus Member

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    Or write them a post in all caps instead. ;)
     
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  3. 8nthatK

    8nthatK Supporting Member

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    Finally, a worthy post in this thread.

     
  4. bassman00

    bassman00 Silver Supporting Member

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    As far as I know, all necks are made with the grain. I'm fairly sure a neck made across the grain would snap under tension. So in both FS and QS necks, the grain runs along the length of the neck. Again, will the same piece of wood sound different depending on which face is the fingerboard? If so, why?

    One correlation could be that since necks are wider than they are thick, the QS ones have more rings present than the FS. Could it be a density difference after shaping? Another is from a stability aspect. Maybe the truss rod tension needs to be more extreme in one orientation or the other to keep it at the proper relief? Maybe it's grain runout which is more prevalent on FS?
     
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  5. Tag

    Tag Gold Supporting Member

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    Ha! You rascal!
    Were the guitars sawn differently? Did #2 have a universal route?
     
  6. ALLCAPSCHAP

    ALLCAPSCHAP Member

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    GIRTH, CANT GET ENOUGH GIRTH.

    GIRTH AND STIFFNESS (DEPENDING ON THE DIRECTION), THATS WHAT ITS ALL ABOUT.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2020
  7. Tag

    Tag Gold Supporting Member

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    I suspect it's something like this, and I am 100% sure they sound different. I am also 100% sure flatsawns sound and react like vintage guitars, vintage guitars were flat sawn!
    That does not take much logic to figure out, and, our blind testing proved this! I have yet to actually play a single example showing otherwise, and remember, it's easier to hear and feel on Teles. The terms would have to be set up exactly the same on a Strat, and even so the springs soften the initial ping. These even goes back years with me in why I always kept and played CS Strats a bit more than Teles, and why up until now I always thought the earliest CS models sounded better.
    (My single example being my first Flat sawn CS Strat) I kept and played that baby for long time! My many QSs never lasted more than a year. I will keep testing a putting up clips as time goes on. Looking forward to my first QS exception. I am sure there must be a few out there that sound like a FS vintage guitar....then again, maybe not. Time and more samples wi tell.
    :beer
     
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  8. rockon1

    rockon1 Member

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    A lot of interesting points. One thing is for sure and thats its a lot of" maybes".
    The QS others have posted didnt seem to suffer frim plinkiness though. Then again I might be biased
     
  9. Tag

    Tag Gold Supporting Member

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    One did, and we need Maple Teles for max effect.
     
  10. rockon1

    rockon1 Member

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    Yeah , ummm, not convinced.
     
  11. Tag

    Tag Gold Supporting Member

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    Then stick to QS and stay away from vintage Fenders.

    :beer
     
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  12. rockon1

    rockon1 Member

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    QS no problem. Unproven hypothesis regarding QS is though. Enough misinformation around already.
     
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  13. bassman00

    bassman00 Silver Supporting Member

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    Well, the "maybes" are what need to be controlled. Problem is, unless you can get two sticks that have identical grain, density, etc, we'll never know for sure. Since no two board, even from the same tree, have been proven to be identical, we'll truly never know. I think Husky's test is the closest we could come.

    And to throw one more cinder on this fire. Does whether the neck blank, or the board it's cut from, was air dried, kiln dried or a combination of both contribute to tonal differences? Does anyone know how Fender dried their lumber back in the day? Does the CS do it the same way today?
     
  14. bassman00

    bassman00 Silver Supporting Member

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    Clearly there's a tonal difference in your examples, but I believe you're generalizing a little too much. Bottom line is play what you love and inspires you.
     
  15. Tag

    Tag Gold Supporting Member

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    More tests coming! Stay tuned!
    However...
    Point#1. Vintage Fenders were flat sawn.
    2: The four vintage Teles I have had access to all reacted the same as the FS Custom shops.
    All QS reacted differently.
    I will keep testing and posting.
    Play what you like, again, I am 100% sold.
    :beer
     
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  16. Route67

    Route67 Member

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    I’m not a scientist, but as one who works with wood, on average, a shaped neck without truss rod that is flatsawn will be much easier to break over the knee than a quarter sawn of same - higher grain content on average of QS will impart more strength and stiffness, whereas the FS will be more pliable. The elephant in the room is with the truss rod installed - if you ever have tried breaking a one piece maple neck with truss rod - it’s well neigh impossible due to the reinforcement - how this translates to tone, all I can say is on average, FS will allow for softer, smoother bloom of notes than QS, the latter which provides an initial harder “attack” of the note plucked - all this applies to the one piece maple neck - in my opinion, a rosewood fretboard adds an additional damping effect to the ringing tone of maple, making a subtle exercise well neigh extremely difficult to judge for tonal response.
     
  17. bassman00

    bassman00 Silver Supporting Member

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    That could be true only if there's runout on the FS side. If it's a perfectly "quartersawn" piece with no runout on the FS side, then there's no exposed grain subjected to the shearing pressure applied in your example. Another "maybe". ;)

    @Tag Can you measure the grain runout of the necks you're testing?
     
  18. Route67

    Route67 Member

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    I think by its very nature a flatsawn neck has runout at the section of curvature at the back of the headstock, but a break along the middle always looks possible to me on a FS if not for truss rod reinforcement.
     
  19. orogeny

    orogeny Member

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    i'm glad i don't have this problem :cool:
     
  20. T92780

    T92780 Silver Supporting Member

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    Get this thread to 100 pages and Fender 2021 NAMM announcement: FCS "True Vintage" LTD with FS necks, hand wound vintage pups from Abby, etc.
     
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