Floyd rose block upgrades

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by evan47, Dec 7, 2017.


  1. evan47

    evan47 Member

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    Has anyone tried upgrading their Floyd rose tremelo block?
    I am interested in peoples findings re the different materials available,,,,,,,brass, titanium, tungsten, copper, granite versus the original block.
    Are there any other worthwhile upgrades that will improve tone?
    I dont expect massive changes to my tone but am willing to splash out a little at a time and have a brass trem stopper fitted (it made the highs ring out a little clearer and helps a lot with tuning stability and note bends at the expense of making the unit only able to drop pitch which does not bother me), a brass spring claw ready to be fitted and a brass big block on its way.
     
  2. guitargeek6298

    guitargeek6298 Member

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    I put a brass big block in my Hamer Diablo. It completely changed the guitar, for the better. I had swapped pickups constantly trying to get a meatier tone, and has finally settled on a Dimarzio Breed set in there, but still wasn't entirely happy.

    I installed the brass block, and suddenly the guitar was louder, and now the tone was too meaty. So I took the Breed Neck, put it in the bridge, and installed an Air Norton that I had in the neck, and it was like the guitar was suddenly reborn.

    Big, big fan of the brass block. I haven't tried the brass claw, but the block completely solved the tone issues that I'd always had with that guitar. It's my next sounding guitar now.
     
  3. B Money

    B Money Member

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    I replaced a crappy zinc trem block on a licensed floyd with a brass block. It make a subtle but noticeable difference. I wouldn't say it was a huge change, but the tone did seem a little more defined and punchy.
    Considering the relatively low cost, I though it was worth it.
     
  4. EADGBE

    EADGBE Member

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    I tried one in a Gotoh Floyd Rose. I didn't like it. I went back to stock in a month. The big brass block made the tone all midrange. It seemed to lose highs and lows. It overly compressed the signal. I think Leo Fender and Floyd Rose got it right with the regular stock block.
     
  5. skhan007

    skhan007 Supporting Member

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    I have a 42mm brass block on one of my Floyd guitars- Instant and huge improvement in low-end and sustain. Thinking about adding one to another one of my Floyd guitars. I'm also curious about Brass vs. Zinc, Titanium, etc. What's the difference between them and does that difference justify the prices?
     
  6. LaXu

    LaXu Member

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    I have some titanium parts in my Carvin C66. They were installed by the previous owner so I don't know how it sounded originally. In any case the block is far more substantial than the one on the OFR and the guitar sounds fantastic.
     
  7. xzacx

    xzacx Member

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    My only experience was with brass, but I have to say that I was shocked with how noticeable it was. It didn't change the character of the instrument or anything that drastic, but I absolutely could tell the difference.
     
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  8. cardinal

    cardinal Member

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    I've done lots of swapping with various size brass and tungsten blocks.

    In short: it depends on the guitar. I don't know why, but I've had some where the block change was so significant a drummer could tell the difference in the sustain and tone (the heavier the block, the more rounded the tone). Others, it seemed to make absolutely no difference.

    Not very helpful, but all you can do it try and see.
     
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  9. jfb44

    jfb44 Member

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    Cost/price is reflected depending on the metal's/alloy's density & "rarity". "Rarer" metals are more difficult to extract from ore to achieve high purity & in bulk quantity therefore cost more to process. Denser metals transmit sound waves/vibrations, i.e. energy, at a slower rate compared to less dense materials which is observed as greater/longer sustain. Theoretically, tremolo blocks made of osmium, iridium or platinum will have the greatest/longest sustain since these are the most dense metals.
     
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  10. skhan007

    skhan007 Supporting Member

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    Cool- Thanks! I'll have to refer to the periodic table to see my choices. Can't imagine the price tag on a platinum sustain block! My brass block sounds pretty darn good, so I'd love to try a guitar with a denser material to see if it's worth the upcharge to my ears.
     
  11. mrwolf

    mrwolf Member

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    I put the tungsten in my Anderson with the non fine tuning Floyd and the difference was huge.
    Its like every frequency is turned up to 11.
    Its an expensive choice but def worthwhile.
     
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  12. mrwolf

    mrwolf Member

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    The spring claw makes absolutely no difference whatsoever.
    I have the KGC claw in one guitar and its beautifully crafted and looks lovely but the tone didn't change in the slightest.
     
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  13. smithguitars

    smithguitars Supporting Member

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    DISCLOSURE:FU Tone Dealer here.
    I have done Brass L Block upgrades on Two EVH guitars of my own, along with titanium inserts, locking bolts and bridge bolts. Instant sustain machines! I use and recommend FU Tone upgrades. I say, Go for it!
     
  14. PBGas

    PBGas Supporting Member

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    You forgot the brass screws. Those are an absolute game changer! They have to all work together.

    ;););):D
     
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  15. PBGas

    PBGas Supporting Member

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    This is very, very true. I have a couple of brass blocks in my Fender CS strats with Floyds. They really made a difference in tone on the alder bodied guitars. Both guitars are just beefier now. I tried it in the PRS Floyd Custom 24 and it didn’t do much of anything so I left those as stock. The original blocks are brass as stock, they are just zinc plated. My Lifeson Axcess already has a decent brass block on the Gotoh system on it.
     
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  16. Mikhael

    Mikhael Member

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    Here's an odd one. On my Parker NiteFly, the springs kept popping out of the block. So, I got a sheet of steel, cut a sliver off, drilled holes in it, and screwed it down on top of where the springs hook into the block, to hold them in place. It made the tone fuller, more balanced, AND it made the vibrato quieter and smoother. I was kind of surprised that there was a tonal difference.

    Oh, and the springs don't pop out any longer. :)
     
  17. evan47

    evan47 Member

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    The block you fitted was most likely too small for the depth of your trem cavity.
     
  18. B Money

    B Money Member

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    I think Ibanez trems have screwed on strip to retain the springs in the block
     

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