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Floyd Rose guys - can this be fixed?

Rick Lee

Member
Messages
11,158
I did not build this one, but rather impulse-bought it without giving a good enough going over. Turns out the lower bridge mounting bolt was just about to break the wood in front of it and it did as soon as I got home, tuned it up and gave the Floyd a VH-like workout. Seller was gracious and helped me epoxy it back, but the bolt still leaned a little forward.



I really wanted to get these bolts perpendicular, so I pulled the bridge off again and there's really not much meat between those bolt holes and the bridge cavity. I don't think I can use wood filler and redrill these. So I tried to pound a few real small finishing nails in front to get the bushing and bolt to going perpendicular. Looked good for a few min, but I think it broke the epoxy free and the wood chunk it only staying put by pushing up against the pickup. This is a real mess now.



Upper bolt leans a tad too and you can see hairline paint crack, but the wood still looks good.



I can't stand to toss this body, as the paintwork is otherwise pretty accurate and it plays pretty well. Can a pro fix this?

 

Eagle1

Senior Member
Messages
8,655
Yes no problem.
You have to rout out a sizable piece and replace it with new wood. The new piece can be a block of maple to take the strain and also extend in to the pickup cavity a tad to prevent it reoccurring.
 

B. Howard

Member
Messages
1,211
Whew! Is this something my local guitar tech can do or is it more specialized?
That will depend on your tech. It is a bit more involved than the typical broken headstock but not the most difficult repair to come in the door I am sure. If he cannot I am sure he will know who to send it to.
 

Rumy22

Senior Member
Messages
287
Fyi, on many floyd rose guitars, I have seen the poles on a slight angle. Whether this has to do with the drilling for the mounts or a product of the pulling against the by the trem (or both), i am not sure. However, it has never affected the playability. So the fact that the poles are perpendicular to the guitar should not drive you crazy.
 

Rick Lee

Member
Messages
11,158
I did a build a few months ago where I made the poles perfectly perpendicular, there's more meat between them and the pickup cavity and that guitar plays like a dream. This one, however, always has issues. Action on high strings just always goes out and buzzes, tuninng goes flat after a day of sitting and I just think those poles are not firmly set. That epoxied wood chunk has moved forward and this needs to be fixed once and for all. Gonna be tough to match the paint with the new piece of wood, but that's the least of my worries now.
 

cardinal

Member
Messages
5,405
I've had a very guitars with leaning posts and they stayed in tune just fine. I'm sure that at somepoint though the problem does need addressing.

The trouble with that guitar is that if you've tried to glue that piece but it's still moving, I think you'll have to just drill it out and graft in a new piece of wood. I'm not sure you'll have any luck trying to glue the piece again because it can be hard to find glue that will adhere to the glue already on the piece.
 

Chris Scott

Member
Messages
9,261
I'd had a post all ready thinking that it has "wood screws" (rather than machine screw/threaded insert) 'til I saw that it already has them.

However, those inserts appear to be smaller in dia. than what I prefer, and you might want to consider upgrading them to a larger diameter, regardless of which repair approach you decide on. (there's a few)
 
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jimshine

Member
Messages
1,594
This is very common. I drill the hole out larger and plug it with a hard maple dowel with the grain running opposite the length of the dowel. Plug the hole, then redrill. I have seen this technique used on some very early factory Floyd Rose equipped that were not Kramers.

This problem has existed to some extent since Floyd Roses came out. The ones that it seems to happen the most to are the basswood or alder bodied guitars with recessed trems and bushings on the studs. Some manufacturers worked around this by using a metal plate for the studs.
 






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