Floyd Rose trem AAARGH!!

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Nekle, Sep 18, 2005.


  1. Nekle

    Nekle Member

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    How do you keep the darn thing from lifting? I've got 5 new springs in it and I can't seem to keep it from lifting and pulling away from the from the guitar as I try to tune it. The strings keep getting farther and farther from the neck. It's an older model which was retrofitted on a strat shaped body. I'm a new floyd user and this is very frustrating. When I got the guitar it was great. No problems. But when I restrung it it has never been the same. :(
     
  2. t0neg0d

    t0neg0d Member

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    Silly question... Are you using the same gauge strings as the ones that were on it when you bought it? If not... you'll need to get a setup!

    Other wise (another silly observation)... don't you want it floating? It is a floating tremlo...

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Nekle

    Nekle Member

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    Hi, thank you for responding. The originals were 9s or 10s but I don't remember. They were thin though. I put 10s on it. Do you think I should just go with thinner guaged strings then? Yes, it's a floating thing. I'm not sure how they are supposed to work. Been an LP player my whole life.
     
  4. poipounder57

    poipounder57 Member

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  5. Kevan

    Kevan Member

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  6. PolyMorf

    PolyMorf Member

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    On a FR you must ALWAYS block under the bridge when changing strings. I usually tuck in a legal pad on my son's Ibanez RG.

    Re-loosen all the strings and get the bridge level with the body and block under it. In reality, it should be level with the bridge height adjusters. You will probably have to play with the springs.

    Retune to pitch with the blocking still in. Take it out and see if the bridge is still level. If it has pulled down you may have to loosen the springs. If it is pulled up, you have to tighten.

    You may have to retune a few times before the tuning becomes stable The key is to keep the bridge parallel to the body/height adjusters. You may have to tweek the springs a few times.

    Regards,

    Harry
     
  7. Neill

    Neill Member

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    Not to derail the thread here but for those who use floyds: why use them? Seems to me that hipshot, wilkinson, point, etc. make non locking trems that work extremely well... especially with straight string pull on the headstock.
     
  8. Gary Ladd

    Gary Ladd Member

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    I guess you weren't a heavy metal guitarist back in the 80s ;)

    The whole purpose of the locking trems is to facilitate doing hundreds of divebombs in a song while still staying in tune, non-lockers won't even come close for the guy yanking on his trem-arm every 3 seconds.

    Although I seldom do dive-bombs these days, I still own a couple of locking systems - They're great for gig situations were the last thing you want to worry about is tuning your guitar, especially if you do a lot of string bends, trem-work & have a heavy right hand...

    :D
     
  9. Nekle

    Nekle Member

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    Thanks for all the good info Poi, Kevan and Harry!
    Harry, the bridge pulls up every time after I remove the block pulling the strings about a half inch away from the neck at the higher frets. I guess I need to find out how to "tighten the bridge" to keep it level. I don't know how to do this yet so I'll look deeper into the links you guys provided. Neil, I'm just stuck with this thing I guess because the mod done to the guitar to get it in there is pretty extensive; side bolts, routing and all. I'm a total newb with a heavy duty trem setting so thanks a lot everyone. The guitar has a Fender strat body and a Warmoth locking neck setup with a raw uncoated neck. It played really nice and low when I got it so the potential to get it back is there I've just got to learn how to do it. Thanks for the help.
     
  10. Scottone

    Scottone Silver Supporting Member

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    I picked up an old Lado II with a Floyd and it had the same issue. Someone had tried to put ultra heavy string on it when it was setup for lighter strings.

    I had never dealt with a Floyd before, but I just followed the directions on a couple of web sites and had it setup after a couple of hours of tinkering.

    Basically, if you want to go to a heavier string guage, you have to tighten the screws holding the claw at the back of the body. You'll find that you have to do a few adjustments to get it right.

    I always scoffed at Floyds before, but they are actually pretty cool if you like using the bar.

    Good luck...
     
  11. Nekle

    Nekle Member

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    Hey! I got it to work!:dude
    Thanks all for your help. It took me a little time to understand what was going on with it. All your references helped. I had to remove the claw bar completely where the springs attach underneath it. It didn't have any play left. It was out of room and the springs weren't staying tight enuf. I put in 3 screws closer to the side wall of the underneath and I attached the circular part of the springs to these and it made enuf spring tensiion to keep the thing from lifting up on the frontside. then I reattached the groung wire. Works great!!
    Thank you Thank you Thank you
    :dude :dude :dude
     
  12. ctoddrun

    ctoddrun Member

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    I never take all of the strings off at one time.


    BAD, BAD idea.

    Block or not, once its set up with the string guage you're gonna use, removing one string and tuning it up again, is the way that works best for me.

    That being said, my Floyd guitar doesnt get much use because:

    a) string change hassel

    b) no access to alternate tunings

    c) I'm not Eddie
     
  13. Kevan

    Kevan Member

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    The 'one string at a time' method is correct for floating trems. It's worked for me for the last decade plus. My RG-ART endures the most violent trem abuse one can throw at it, and it *always* (yes- always) returns to zero.

    I think the main reason people avoid FR trems is simple laziness. A FR is more maintenance than a hardtail. People don't want to spend the extra time setting it up to work properly, and then maintain it. Lame reason, but it's my guess.
    Sorry Todd, but I have to call you on all your points here. Well...maybe not number C.

    A. Ever tried threading a string thru a Strat trem block in a dark club? Talk about a hassle. My FR trems: zip out the old string, zip in the new one (reverse; with the ball end at the tuner), one snip with the wire cutters at the fine tuner, lock the string end in the saddle, and tune. Quick.
    As an aside, pretty much anything can be considered a hassle if you're not used to doing it regularly.

    B. Not true. I fixed that: http://www.tremol-no.com

    C. Yeah, sadly neither am I. :D
     
  14. NuSkoolTone

    NuSkoolTone Member

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    I take all strings off to clean and start from scratch and never have a problem.

    1. 1st get all the fine tuners about halfway before tuning guitar to pitch.

    2.Get the guitar up to tune but a hair flat before locking down the nut (The nut sharps the string a hair when you lock it.)

    3.Tune the guitar with the fine tuners. Repeat tuning about 3-4 times until the tremolo stabilizes.

    4.(optional) Stretch strings a little bit, and do step 3 again. If the strings stretched so far that the fine tuners run out of room, then repeat steps 1-3.

    Sure, it takes 5 minutes more than a "normal" guitar but once that baby's in, it STAYS in longer than any other!
     
  15. Randy

    Randy Member

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    I basically do it this way too, except I just play the heck out of it (without touching the bar) to stretch the strings before I lock down the nut at all, using the headstock tuners to get it back to pitch while the strings stretch out. Once the guitar is staying in tune this way, I clamp down the nut, fine tune and hardly ever have to touch it again until the next string change.
     

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