Flyng V ?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by aroman, Jan 26, 2006.

  1. aroman

    aroman Member

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    What tone difference will you expect between a Mahogany V with stop tail Tune-o-matic bridge vs a Korina V with "strings thru body" bridge ?
    (Everything else being equal)
     
  2. Neill

    Neill Member

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    no idea other than to me korina has more "presence" or "fidelity" than mahogany. a little brighter....
     
  3. µ¿ z3®ø™

    µ¿ z3®ø™ Member

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    golly, that's a tough one.
    i really only have tons of experience w/ the old skool korina V's.
    i have played 'other' V's tho'.
    my preference is for the korina V's.
    i think they are thicker sounding w/ an interesting harmonic overtone that is quite different from mahogany stop tailpiece V's. to my ears, they have a more unique tone. this could come down to the necks as well. generally speaking, all the korina V's i've played have had quite substantial necks and it is my belief that big necks quite often mean big tone.
    i think that someone could mistake the sound of a mahogany V for that of an SG or maybe even an all mahogany les laul custom. the korina has a much more unique voice that i don't think i would ever mistake for anything else.
    i'm curious to hear other peeps impressions of this issue.
     
  4. AaeCee

    AaeCee Member

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    Absolutely spot-on. And I'll add a bit. I have a Korina Historic Gibson V with the 'strings through' configuration. As Neill implied, it is extremely resonant...you can really 'hear the wood'. Further, having also played one with a stoptail, mine has an overall snappier nature to it, with a more complex tonality. No mistaking the sound for anything else. The V/stoptail OTOH, exhibited a bit more of a generic sound...closer to a SG. If you can, def go with the strings through set up, especially with a korina body. It's an awesome wood, and you will want to hear every nuance. That's the mix to get there, and it's why that model is held in such high esteem. AC
     
  5. HEY!YOU!

    HEY!YOU! Senior Member

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    I agree with the others plus the design originally was for string thru body....for a reason.
    Here's mine:
    [​IMG]
     
  6. AaeCee

    AaeCee Member

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    And BTW...both models you mention have a tune-o-matic bridge. The difference is, one is string-thru, the other has a stoptail. Just to clear up any confusion. AC
     
  7. AJ Love

    AJ Love Senior Member

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    I sure love Albert King's tone...
     
  8. aroman

    aroman Member

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    Thank you !!
     
  9. exhaust_49

    exhaust_49 Member

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    I'm intrested on how different mahogany and korina sound. I plan to build a les paul with a maple top and korina back/neck.
     
  10. leoman57

    leoman57 Guest

    I have been building warmoth partscaster guitars over the last few years. I have tried a few different woods and have come down to swamp ash, mahogany and Black and White Limba(korina) for my builds.

    I'll start with the black limba by saying it sounds completely different than white, nothing like anything I have ever heard. Sort of a mix of walnut, white korina and mahogany, very much like an old firebird tone wise. I tried a mahogany neck and a white limba neck on the black body and liked the mahogany better, more snap and pop. The white limba neck made the guitar too tame.

    Which leads me to what Korina is all about, it's warm, smooth with a sweet high end. I used the white limba neck on a light weight swamp ash body to tame the annoying high end of the light weight swamp ash.

    I would not recommend a maple cap on white korina, I have had extremely mixed results with maple necks on white bodies. I have tried about 4 necks and three sounded bad, one sounded great but I didn't like the way it played. That neck was a very white soft maple that had "no" flame or Birdseye at all, as opposed to the other necks which had a mix of both to varying degrees. If anything I would put a mahogany cap on it which will give you a little more snap in the tone.

    Of course the neck wood has a lot to do with it also. Overall it's a soft sweet sounding wood and needs a little help. As for Albert King's guitar, his pickups were real unpotted PAF's and were slightly microphonic. Couple that with his enormous hands and plucking away with a thumb the size of three of my fingers and that's a big sound.

    I have also noticed that white limba can get a little screechy with a lot of gain. It's not an easy wood to deal with because it's very neutral and can accentuate some of the negatives of the other woods and pickups you are using. But once you dial it in, it will be a very toneful and sweet sounding guitar.

    I would not recommend using it for a neck wood, it's very soft. I think depending on how thick the cap of your guitar would be, maybe you should think about a mahogany neck and a maple cap sans the flame. If you don't care about having the beautiful aesthetic effect of flame that is.

    As for a Flying V made of mahogany verses White Korina........close, I think the string through body of the Korina helps. I also think the mahogany would have more bite and a bigger bottom end, the Korina a sweeter more focused midrange.
     
  11. exhaust_49

    exhaust_49 Member

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    I was thinking of doing a warmoth chambered lp with black korina body with a maple cap, white korina neck with a brazillian rosewood fretboard but since your post leoman57 I'm thinking a black limba body with a maple cap, mahogany neck with a brazillian rosewood fretboard.

    I'm making this guitar for classic rock (ac/dc, zeppelin, bto ect.) and blues. I also want to be able to get some new rock tones (nickelback) which is a very different sound. Maby I should just stick to mahogany body with a maple cap, mahogany neck and a brazillian rosewood fretboard. Both the classic rock artists and many of the new rock artists I like use mahogany guitars. But whatever I get Im planning on getting the body chambered for more resonance.

    What do you think?
     
  12. leoman57

    leoman57 Guest

    By having the guitar chambered you are adding to the equation. If you dig players that use mahogany bodies, than by all means go that way. If you want to get close but something a little different go with the black Limba.

    The White korina neck also needs a lot of finish. The body attachment screw holes strip easily and unless you get a fatback profile you might have tuning problems. There just might not be enough wood on a thinner profile.

    I don't think the chambered body does **** as far as resonance once the guitar is plugged in. Unless you are comparing it to a heavy overly finished body. Too much finish will deaden the sound and a very heavy wood will also change things. Think in terms of the Les Paul's from the Norlin era circa mid 70's, very heavy mahogany, maple neck and a lot of finish.....dead sounding guitars. Not even the maple cap and neck could over come that heavy mahogany and thick finish.

    What you hear without the amp might be the exact opposite with the amp cranked. I think the biggest reason to get a chambered guitar is for weight factors and if you play with a cleaner sound. I had a chambered DC LP that I put a Tom Holmes pup in the neck and it sounded great. I always crank my amps and it did not sound like it was chambered at all.

    There is a lot to it, again it's the equation. You have to make it like an equation, one thing in the equation changes everything and everything is a factor. You might think you have the equation figured out only to find once every thing is together your equation was wrong. Although you must give the guitar some time to mellow out, it might not sound good right away. It will definitely sound different in a week or two.
     
  13. exhaust_49

    exhaust_49 Member

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    I am chambering the guitar mainly for the weight relief (bad back) and just see the added resonance as a plus. Even if the guitar does not have any added resonance, my back will be happy.

    I'm gonna go all mahogany with a flame maple cap and brazillian rosewood fretboard with chambering. I also already had the 59' roundback profile from warmoth set in my mind.

    About the guitar being an equation, your right but I think there are too many factors (also ones that you can't control) at work. You can enginner a guitar to sound great and if the wood is too dense, you have an expensive piece of firewood.
     

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