For the Shred Community

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by IndieHead, Sep 17, 2006.

  1. IndieHead

    IndieHead Member

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    Shredders and frens with super quick fingers...

    how many of you can perform your chops on a 7.25 radius and vintage frets? Most of the shredders i know only play on flatter boards and when i present them with my vintage strat, they just cant play as fast or accurately!

    The only player that can do that is Yngwie, but his strats are all scalloped...
     
  2. teleshred

    teleshred Member

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    i think it's a matter of getting used to..I used to struggle playing as fast as on my pgm, but after playing with my tele for extended hours i'm able to play fast on it, but not as fast as with my pgm..
     
  3. jakob

    jakob Member

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    12 radius makes it easier for me but I guess it's what you are used to.
    I have been playing 9.5 radius now for some time and I must say that
    It's starting to feel really good but 7.25 that's to much for me...
     
  4. Luke

    Luke Senior Member

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    When will this scalloped fingerboard let's you play faster myth ever die? The analogy makes no sense, it is like saying you can run 2 mph faster on your treadmill when wearing Nike sneakers.
     
  5. leper messiah

    leper messiah Member

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    The Ibanez JS series of guitars that Satriani plays are designed pretty close to vintage strat specs. He seems to do ok...
     
  6. jakob

    jakob Member

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    JS uses a Multi-radius Prestige neck....can anybody explain how works ?
     
  7. jazzandmetal?

    jazzandmetal? Supporting Member

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    It starts at a low radius and gradually moves to a higher falt radius as you go up the neck. Think it is called a compound radius.
     
  8. Yngtchie Blacksteen

    Yngtchie Blacksteen Member

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    ...which makes bending a lot easier. Doesn't affect speed.

    It all depends on what you're accustomed to, for the most part. Any good player should be able to pick up any guitar and make it sound great. Eric Johnson is a guy who normally plays really old Strats, and he rips like no other.
     
  9. IndieHead

    IndieHead Member

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    Eric Johnson had his tech to reradius his good old 57 and had medium jumbo frets put on them. But I m sure he could play really fast with the vintage specs. but how many EJs are there? for most of us, it would be a struggle.
     
  10. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    I always overhear people saying "O no, this isn't valid music, the radii of the guitars being played is all wrong!"

    Come freakin' on! Who cares what you play it on? Does it sound good? Does it move you? I don't care if it's played on a tuba with strings nailed to it. If it has the power to move me, I like it.
     
  11. jakob

    jakob Member

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    That really has nothing to do with his question at all.
     
  12. Shredcow

    Shredcow Member

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    Its a matter of getting used to... though, take a 7.25" radius to a 14" radius as comparable to a family car to a racing car. Each does its job but one's optimised for a specific task.

    I would say that a shredder wouldn't be at his best if he were to use gear that does not compliement his playing style. He can get used to the guitar, and still shred, but not at his best.
     
  13. KRosser

    KRosser Member

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    Where exactly is the 'shred community', and can I get there by bus from downtown?
     
  14. beePee

    beePee Member

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    I agree!!!.... even though the analogy isn't very strong with the Nikes.

    FOR ME scalloped finger boards not only make bending easier it also helps with hammmers and pulls but more than cancels the speed out with with slides.Sorry but the the radius/action thing is pretty goofy equvalent to speed.

    Speed is about accuracy,synchonization,genetics and lots of practice ,Practice ,PRACTICE!! :RoCkIn .....not the fretboard radius or string action.I think most guitarist are slowed down by lack of honest practice than blisters on their fingers....:crazy

    BP
     
  15. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    But what you said below does?
    :crazy
     
  16. drfrankencopter

    drfrankencopter Member

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    I think sweeping should actually be easier on a low radius fretboard, that way the natural curve of the fretboard helps you roll your fretting hand, as opposed to flatter boards where your fingers have roll to damp the non played strings.

    As far as radius and speed goes, I think there's no correlation. Flatter radius' help with bending and not fretting out. If you measure a well played vintage guitar they often end up with a somewhat compound radius after the frets have been dressed a number of times.

    I think anyone who's playing at the limits of their ability is going to have a tough time when presented an instrument that's very different from what they're used to playing.

    Cheers,

    Kris
     
  17. slhguitar

    slhguitar Member

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    I find it has more to do with the profile and thickness of the neck itself, and less to do with the radius of the fretboard. For example, the Ibanez guitars designed with a very flat and thin neck make it easier to keep your thumb centred on the neck. I think its true that a good player will be a good player no matter what guitar he/she is playing, but I think that some guitars/necks provide a greater handicap, especially when speed and precision is the major concern. IMHO, of course.
     
  18. nickreynolds

    nickreynolds Member

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    You can run 2+ mph faster with Nikes if you normaly run with your lead boots on :AOK
     
  19. Cokemachine

    Cokemachine Member

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    I have a love/hate relationship with "compound radius" necks mainly because although the concept mathematically makes sense, very few builders actually implement the design properly. The way that some builders subjectively graduate several different radii together definitely describes a "compound radius". The correct approach however is best described as a "conical radius". I generally default to the old "if it feels good it is good" ideology. What works for one person may not necessarily work for the others. Some players just feel more comfortable with a straight radius as opposed to a compound or conical radius fretboard. I know I do even though the math says I shouldn't.

    I do think that most players pay too much attention to fingerboard radius. Typically, the hardware on a guitar plays more of a limiting factor than the actual radius of the fingerboard with regard to the playability. For example, the Floyd Rose bridge was designed around a 10" radius. Many other bridges out there simply do not have the adjustability to compliment vintage radiused fingerboards such as 7.25" and 9.5". Look at any lock nut - how many of them have a radius on them. As slhguitar pointed out, neck profile has a much larger affect on playabilty than fingerboard radius and in my opinion is the largest contributor to playabilty.

    Locking trems systems like Floyds are one thing and most modern bridges do allow for more variety in setup, but really, to say that you play like a god on a 12" radius and like a one armed Simpson's character on a 7.25" is a bit of a stretch. Obviously, everybody has a radius that they are more comfortable with, but I cannot see it becoming a huge limiting factor to one's playing.
     

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