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For those who were teens in ‘77, what was your reaction to Never Mind The Bollocks?

sixty2strat

Member
Messages
12,562
Their music never did anything for me because as far as I can tell it wasn’t really about that. Music was not the primary product of the band, it was an excuse for being seen. Their image and fashion sense, their identities, that was what they were peddling, and that’s where all the talk of changing dress etc comes from. If they were starting up today, when a justification for being in front of a camera beyond being good looking is no longer demanded, I imagine they’d be Instagram influencers or something. I know this will get be drawn and quartered but I don’t care.
Not totally an unfair view. I came to them late and thru reggae into the clash then into the Pistols. So by that time the culture war of fashion had passed. What was left a very decent hard rock album, that stands up better then the BS hype should have permitted. Then there is Richard III twisted bitterness of John Lydon which as a coddled American teen was really meaningless from 77-82, just so much look at us stick. As a young adult in my early 20's stuck in a series of soul sucking jobs (20 years of schooling and the put you on the day shift )and a faded American dream crushed from 2 recessions , now no matter what they meant or contrived it was"we mean" struck home. About the same time I became a Dylan fan. So hair metal guys singing about party 24-7 or Or the happy idiots shouting born in the USA and who failed to understood the irony I was angry and felt cheated. The Pistols were never going to be Zep or Crimson but I was an angry young man they at last seemed authentic, stripped of the fashion and trend.
 

bailydread

Member
Messages
164
Nice rebuttal and I see where you are coming from as well. Perhaps it’s something you had to experience firsthand when it happened to appreciate. Or perhaps I am just jaded from being from a generation where rebellion is the status quo, because we were educated by the culture that followed from holding those attitudes as an ideal. The rebellion acted out by my generation is, in my opinion, very superficial and vain, for the most part, and in fact it has had a niche carved out for it by the powers that be so that we feel we have more of a voice than we actually do. It’s both convenient and relatively easy to corral. And so I see the now-establishment rebellion of bands like the Sex Pistols as being the first driven nails in the walls of my generation’s temper tantrum sandbox. Having written this out, I realize this is not necessarily the band’s doing, so my complaint isn’t really with them. They probably just wanted to get chicks and look cool like most kids.
 
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Aaron Mayo

Member
Messages
2,201
I think it’s a great rock n roll album. Didn’t hear it till the 80s, alongside other punk and hardcore music that was fun to skate and destroy to. I was told that “punk rock sucks” but the cook at the restaurant I worked at, which was perfect.

I wasn’t into the fashion and the other stuff, just loved the sound of it. It’s pretty much “maximum rock n’ roll” to quote the title of a fanzine from back in the day.
 
Messages
1,950
At the time, I was 17-18 and thought the Pistols (and punk, in general...) sucked. It was an excuse for peeps who couldn’t play or sing to be in a band. And, this coming from a New York Dolls fan ;). Then, came all The Knack wannabes with their skinny ties. But... lots of good bands came out of all that and I came to appreciate and like many of them. A lot. Rock had become kind of bloated and it did give it a kick in the ass. I even like a few Pistols songs though I found them mostly obnoxious (JR, I’m talking to you...) and the least talented of many of their peers.
 




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