Found out one of my old pedals is collectible

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by adcard, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. adcard

    adcard Member

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    So apparently that cheap old Delay pedal I bought used as a teenager is kinda collectible.

    Its a Boss DD-2 made in December 1983. Never thought anything about it. Just assumed it was a junky old out of date delay pedal not worth a second thought.

    I've spent most of my professional playing days not using a delay, but a few years ago when I switched to a non-reverb amp I wanted to add a little ambience and I knew I didn't want or need anything complicated so I just got a nice simple analog MXR carbon copy....as you see Im not extremely versed in delay pedals :)

    I've selling unused gear like a mad man lately so I was sitting at my computer and saw this thing in the corner and figured I was just see if it can at least sell for enough to justify the effort of listing, selling and shipping....like $40. So I searched it on ebay and saw all these prices in the $100's $200's and even $300's. Bout crapped myself!! (Granted there aren't a lot of them actually selling for more than two hundred but even to see some listing as high as that was quite surprising)
    Looks like somewhere in the $150-$170 is a good average sell price.

    Now I don't know if I should sell it or hold on to it. I do want money these days, but maybe this one I should hold to?
    Thoughts??
     
  2. mcdes

    mcdes Member of no importance

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    If you ain't using it, sell it. Unless your a collector? Ha
     
  3. Class5

    Class5 Member

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    I've been playing so long all my old gear is now vintage & collectible.
     
  4. Harvesterofsorrow

    Harvesterofsorrow Member

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    cool, same with my boss ce-2 made in oct 83
     
  5. MG90

    MG90 Member

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    As soon as you sell it you will want it back. Years later, for the rest of your life actually, you will still regret selling and wish you had it.
     
  6. zosozep7

    zosozep7 Gold Supporting Member

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    Keep it! Its the long chip inside that makes it sound nice and warmer then your normal dd pedal. Ive got 3 ofthem.
     
  7. sbr

    sbr Member

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    I foolishly sold one last year and I've regretted ever since the following week.
     
  8. jacoblee83

    jacoblee83 Member

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    I have my dad's old CE-2. I don't use it but for sentimental value alone I will probably never sell it.
     
  9. FlyingDutchman

    FlyingDutchman Member

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    I still have an original Marshall Bluesbreaker pedal I got for Christmas when they were first released. Its still in its box with manual. Ill never sell it. Gift from the parents.

    I did trade away an original Whammy WH-1 that I got brand new for a birthday when they first came out and Ive regretted it ever since. I even paid top dollar for two of them over the years but the sentimental value just isnt there..
     
  10. Zerksies

    Zerksies Member

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    I would sell the thing if you are not using it or have a desire to use it, buy something cool that you will use
     
  11. vintage66

    vintage66 Member

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    You wanted to sell it until you found out you could get more than you expected for it? :p
    If you truly don't like it and don't expect to want it back, sell it. If you have any doubts, I'd hang on to it. Of course you could wait to see if it goes up. I could have bought one about 3 years ago for $80-probably should have, but I didn't like it so I went analog.
    Theres the flip side-sometimes I'll think of a pedal (or guitar) I used to have and wish I had it back, then can't remember what I bought with the money from it. Most pedals I don't miss-I sold them for a reason. Guitars though....
     
  12. adcard

    adcard Member

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    I am going to keep it for now. But I need to get one thing fixed for sure. The other day before I realized that its even worth keeping I pulled it out at my teaching studio on a whim and plugged it in. It worked, then it would not come one, then it worked for a minute, then nothing. Didn't really think much of it, but I just happen to bring it home to see if maybe I could get it working on my own. Just out of curiosity.

    Well when I got inside of it, there was one thing right off the bat that stood out: Look at that Brown Disk Cap on the back of the DC supply board. It has a burnt spot on it.

    [​IMG]

    I didn't even really know exactly what that was. I was fairly certain it was in the Capacitor family. I wasn't sure if something was causing a short so i put a small layer of Elec. tape on the inside wall close to where that Cap would make contact if it could. That seemed to work. I used it for several hours at the house this past weekend on my practice amp.

    But now that I know that this pedal is actually worth something, I want to fix it correctly.

    From what I understand that little orange'ish brown disk is a "Ceramic Disk Capacitor". And it is on the back of the DC Supply Board What really stumped me was when I started reading about DD-2 repairs and and common causes of pedal failures. I did not come across one single source talking about this particular Cap having any issues. I wanted to find somebody describing the exact issue my pedal is having so I can could replicate their procedure to fix it. Also, if Im going to get a new Cap to replace this one I need to know exactly what to get and these Caps don't have standard coding on them.
    They are one solid color. They have a 3-digit number up top but no Letter Letter after the number for a "tolerance" code just the three numbers. then the voltage in the middle, and then a set of three letters that I can't find any relevance to. The info from the top of the cap is : "104" "25V" "KCK" So thats .1uF (104pF), 25V, no tolerance indication and God only knows what "KCK" means.

    Are these a correct replacement for that cap?
    Does anybody have any experience with this stuff or know exactly where to go to find these answers?


    I went a head and ordered some caps that I think are right. The ones in the middle of the picture


    [​IMG]




    Also, Incase anybody is interested here is the schematic:


    [​IMG]
     
  13. adcard

    adcard Member

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    The thing is I can't honestly say if I like it or not. To me that was always just some old thing that I have had for ever. I might have messed around with it when i was younger, but as a professional musician I never gave it the time of day since I just assumed it was inferior.

    Its not just that I was going to sell something I didn't like until I found out it was worth a little bit of money....I was going to sell something that I have always ASSUMED was no good and when I saw what they are selling for it wasn't really about the money or the value, it was the fact that apparently I have had a nice good quality pedal sitting in a drawer for all these years.

    So now I am intrigued to at least try it out on my pedal board live.
     
  14. Jahn

    Jahn Listens to Johnny Marr, plays like John Denver Supporting Member

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    all of my old pedals sold for "vintage" prices - my old TS-10, PS-5, bud box dyna comp, russian muff and stone, FL9, and so on. one man's old is another man's vintage.
     
  15. guitarz1972

    guitarz1972 Member

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    Keep it OP, unless you just get hard up for about $150. Keep it in a drawer, pull it out every once in a while for something different, bragging rights, etc. Cool pedal, definitely get it fixed.

    Cheers.
     
  16. amp_surgeon

    amp_surgeon Member

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    Yes, it's a 0.1uF cap. If it's on the DC power jack board then it's almost certainly used to power line filtering. It's not in the signal path, and replacing it won't affect the tone of the pedal.

    KCK was a Thai company that made ceramic caps. The company was FOUNDED in 1987. That either means your pedal is newer than you thought, or that cap has been replaced at some point in time, or Roland simply installed a cap that barely fit. From the photo (as near as I can tell) the cap rubbed on the chassis, eventually chipping the ceramic coating away and shorting the capacitor to ground.

    The tolerance isn't critical with power filtering caps. When they list one tolerance number it often does NOT mean plus or minus. It often means only the minus tolerance. The plus tolerance can often be as much as 80% higher. This isn't a bad thing. With power filtering caps you generally just want enough capacitance to get the job done. Too much won't hurt anything.... within reason. A beer can 1000uF electrolytic would put a heavy startup load on a wall wart, but 80% up from 0.1uF isn't even 0.2uF.

    The problem you've got is the diameter of the cap. Can it be bent down away from the chassis? The diameter is dependent on the capacitance, the voltage rating, the dielectric material, and the number of layers. You want to replace it with one of the same capacitance, if possible. 25V is near the bottom end for ceramics. You might be able to find a 12V cap that would work, but I wouldn't waste too much time looking for one.

    Dielectric material is divided into three common classes, I to III. Class I has the highest accuracy and best stability. Class III has the worst. Conversely, class I capacitors tend to be bigger diameter (called "volumetric capacity"), while class III tend to be smaller. You can sometimes still got relative small diameter in a class I or II capacitor by getting multiple layers - they're thicker but smaller diameter.

    If you don't have room to bend that cap away from the chassis then hunt the Mouser site for a cap with a small enough diameter. The cap in your picture would work, but the question is whether or not it will fit.
     
  17. adcard

    adcard Member

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    Yeah even after I get it completely fixed, I will probably only bring it out every now and then on gigs. I'll mostly just keep it her at the house.
     
  18. durbanpoison

    durbanpoison Member

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    Still got my MIJ DM-2 that I bought back in the early 80s while I was a teenager!
     
  19. vintage66

    vintage66 Member

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    When I tried a one, I really couldn't hear a difference between it and a DD-3 for instance-it still sounded very digital and exact. Is the diffrerence very subtle? That's just not the sound I wanted and maybe was expecting it to sound warmer or something because of the bigger chip. It's funny that we're talking about discontinued digital chips now like the old discontinued analog stuff like the DMM 3005 vs 3008's.
     
  20. KennyM

    KennyM Supporting Member

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    Same here although I refuse to admit it lol.

    I have so many seemingly collectible things around my studio that sadly I'm the original owner of. I guess one of these days I'll have to face the fact that I am now vintage :bonk

    Doubt my value has risen considerably though.
     

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