Fret Board Note Chart

22990atinesh

Member
Messages
32
Hello friends, I've started learning guitar couple of months ago. I'm trying to understand the basic concepts. Below is the "Fret Board Note Chart" that I made, after what my music teacher told me. What I wanna know is that, does all the major/minor scales and chords are based on this chart. Actually I've a A minor Scale which contains notes not in the order as of above chart.


 

The Funk

Member
Messages
4,556
Hello friends, I've started learning guitar couple of months ago. I'm trying to understand the basic concepts. Below is the "Fret Board Note Chart" that I made, after what my music teacher told me. What I wanna know is that, does all the major/minor scales and chords are based on this chart. Actually I've a A minor Scale which contains notes not in the order as of above chart.


The chart is backwards, or at least 90 degrees rotated, depending on how you look at it.

All the notes are there. There are no notes in Western music that cannot be played. Thats every scale, every chord. All there.

There are 12 tones in western music. If you look at your guitar, you will see that there are 2 dots at the 12th fret. This is not random. If you start from an open string and play every fret up to the 11th fret, you will play every note in western music. Then, starting from the 12th fret, it just repeats. It is this way for every string.

Each string is set 5 tones higher than the previous string, except for the B string, which is 4. Why is it 4? Because it makes it easier to do things because it helps you maintain fingering patterns across the fretboard. The guitar is designed for accompanying a vocalist, so it is optimized for chording.

This setup also makes it so that in any 4 fret span, you have every note available to you. These are called "positions".

The plus side of all of this, is that if you can remember certain finger patterns, you can play anything you want without actually knowing anything about music.

The guitar is an interface to the western musical system. If you learn the interface, you can control the system, even if you don't learn the system. It is the opposite of say, a piano.
 

gigs

Member
Messages
11,051
Seesm to me it would be more visually useful if it just indicated the whole notes (remove the accidentals). We typically know what's between the A and the B.
 
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jazzguitar

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
641
LOL! I was going to post something helpful but I think I'll see where this goes first. :rotflmao
 

Polynitro

Member
Messages
23,616
that looks incredibly complicated.

I learned all the notes one string at a time. Rote memory should take about a week or two or three depending how motivated you are. helps to sing each note.

great great thing to memorize all the notes on the board no matter what method you use.
 

luv

Member
Messages
3,154
I actually like the chart, but not in it's current orientation. I think it helps see the relationship of the notes on the fretboard.

OP - the chart (for a right handed guitarist) should look more like this

E ->
B ->
G ->
D ->
A ->
E ->

That way, like someone mentioned, the chart looks more like the fretboard as you are looking down at it from a playing position. Easier to visualize that way. Noone was mocking you, just having some fun. I don't quite understand your original question either. I think you are asking about the relationship of different notes to different scales. Everything scale has a root note and climbs from there, but each scale has a different pattern of notes....sharing some notes and not sharing others. Good luck in your process.
 

Tex Milo

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
512
What the F*** do you mean ?
I'm new to music It doesn't mean you'll mock me.
The chart is good man. No one was trying to mock you! We come in peace! With that said the chart may be backwards to us Yankees but it's easy for me to read FWIW.
 

22990atinesh

Member
Messages
32
Hello Guys I think I found the solution to my ques. I know its actually upside down, musician prefer another standard way of showing the fret board but that was not my doubt. My doubt was is there any other arrangement of notes than the above fret board note chart. Ans is yes. Actually The above Fretboard Note chart is valid for standard tuning (E tuning). If we change the tuning, the notes across the fret board will get changed. For example suppose we have tuned the guitar in standard D (DGCFAD). Then the fret board note chart will become.

 

Forgotten

Member
Messages
422
Just chart it yourself, its a standard exercise everyone does when taking lessons. If you need help grab a pocket tuner, and fret A note. It will tell you what note your playing. it tell you if your on any eadgb.
 






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