fusion is a no go.

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by GrantMe, Aug 9, 2005.


  1. GrantMe

    GrantMe Guest

    ok i need help here......i am working in the vein of a fusion type style playing....my problem is my improve sucks most of the time and im not so sure as to why. ....i cant play with anyone at this time and havnt for over 2 years but that will end soon....so i record some random progression and then go back and improvise over it but mostly its just not there even if its melodic its just not in step with the progression..it just sounds bad...do you think this is because i dont have a good grasp of the progression before i improvise or is there something you think im missing in general?..i mean i understand many many options that i can play in a fusion setting so ..i dont know....i dont think its just a practice thing either because its been going on for awhile now...if its like some standard blues, rock, pop, or country kinda thing i sound fine but the jazz or fusion vein it just isnt there mostly....i know this is kinda a vague question but if you have any opinions let me know.
     
  2. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    Some questions come to mind:

    What kinda' progression are we talking about? Which chords, how many measures per chord? What time signature? What kinda' melodic ideas are you playing over them? Are they complex ideas, or are they simple motifs that you are bringing through the changes (and altering them for the chord changes)? Etc. etc. All these questions and more.

    Stick with it. You'll get past this.

    Cheers,

    Dave
     
  3. GrantMe

    GrantMe Guest

    to answer your multiple questions......its all different every time...lol..just what ever i feel like at that moment.....im sure i will get past it its just that i havnt gotten better in a couple years with this stuff.....thanks for the reply.
     
  4. StevenA

    StevenA Member

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    Any time you find yourself unhappy with the results you have been getting, it is usually a result of not doing it enough: Not listening enough, singing enough, playing with other musicians enough, practicing enough, taking lessons enough, writing out lines enough, transcribing enough. Do all these things for 500,000 hours and then tell me how its going.

    Steven
     
  5. spencerbk

    spencerbk Member

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    my guess from that sentence is that you aren't hitting the changes. When starting with a new progression - you can always seek out the "sweet" notes of the chord and sound good. By sweet I generally mean 1,3,5, and 7 - but as your ear gets better you can start to use all the notes more and more.

    For example, if you were playing an unusual "random" progression like Ebmaj7 to Gmaj7, the 1,3,5, and 7 of each chord is Eb, G, Bb, D and G, B, D, F# respectively. G and D are in both chords so you can always hang around those two - and accent the Bb to B change as you change chords (While the F# over the Eb chord will be pretty dissonant, for example).

    More common chord progressions will have many notes in common from chord to chord throughout an entire song - making things a little easier, but still spend time accenting the notes that change with each chord

    good luck
     
  6. GrantMe

    GrantMe Guest

    i think your exactly right and thats what i was leaning towards....becausei dont have the greatest ear and dont always hear or know when the change is coming up because up because i just dont have the groove of the progression solid....and yet i always seem to play by ear when i record these little things...or at least attempt...lol

    so do think its my ear or my lack intimacy with the song im playing over...im sure its both though huh? lol
    thanks
     
  7. hear and play

    hear and play Member

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    That's continuous music (no toilet, food, sleep) 24/7 for slightly over 57 years.

    Not only would your skills improve, you could write one heck of a jazz-blues about your experience.

    :cool:
     
  8. spencerbk

    spencerbk Member

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    My guess is that it is "lack of intimacy" - since if you can hear where the chords are going, then your ear has done its job. For example, if you can listen to the blues and not be surprised when the progression turns around again, your ear is working. Playing what your ears hear is a different challenge, as is knowing more "complex" songs as well as you know the blues.

    When you described recording a random chord progression - that sounded off an alarm for me. In fusion, jazz, rock, etc. no progression is ever "random" - unpredictable if you hadn't heard it before perhaps - but there is a pattern. And the patterns usually aren't too hard to predict ... 4 beats of this, 2 beats of that, 2 beats of another, repeat, etc. Furthermore - the chords are usually arranged in a way that sounds good - which often means there will be patterns within the patterns you'll come to recognize.

    I have found that even unexperienced musician can sing a very melodic solo if they are familiar with the song (i.e. the chord progression, even if they don't know it). The next step is translating that to guitar.
     

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