Fusion theory or analysis sites.

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Frank Prince, Jan 6, 2008.


  1. Frank Prince

    Frank Prince Member

    Messages:
    3,546
    Joined:
    May 31, 2004
    Location:
    Omaha, NE
    I realize this could be an unclear topic, but are there any sites that deal with compositional analysis of artists like the Dregs, Mahavishnu, Tribal Tech, Chick Corea, Weather Report, etc.?

    It seems that there are common chord forms and sounds among these bands, but even though I have listened to an enormous amount of this music, I still have trouble "wrapping my head around the chord structures", recognizing where the key changes are heading, etc., the way I can with simpler rock, funk, jazz, and RnB tunes.

    If you do not know any sites but have some tips for this kind of pattern recognition, that would also be great.
     
  2. Swain

    Swain Member

    Messages:
    2,412
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2005
    Location:
    N. Little Rock, AR.
    This site (TGP) is a pretty good start. I have a feeling, you're gonna be doing a LOT of reading, soon! LOL
     
  3. Kappy

    Kappy Member

    Messages:
    14,044
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2005
    Location:
    West Village, NYC
    Not sure how active he is on the site, but Don Mock used to teach the fusion course at GIT, currently teaches in Seattle and has his own site: http://www.guitaraxis.com I can't recall specific analyses of the artists you mentioned, but he comes heavily out that school of playing and music.

    Also, TheRealAllanHoldsworth.com's forum, when they're talking about music and not being another stupid guitar player comparison forum, have some pretty good info (threads, tabs, etc) in the technique section.

    Best of luck!

    Dave
     
  4. jzucker

    jzucker Supporting Member

    Messages:
    20,237
    Joined:
    May 20, 2003
    Location:
    Home of the ex-world champion Cavs
    IMO, there no such thing as "fusion" theory. It sounds to me like you need some background with "jazz" theory. Pick up Mark Levine's book. I"m assuming you have a grasp of traditional music theory? If not, start there instead.
     
  5. wire 247

    wire 247 Member

    Messages:
    486
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2006
    Location:
    Marietta Ga.
    Getting Scott Hendersons videos would'nt hurt either.......
     
  6. John Czajkowski

    John Czajkowski Member

    Messages:
    1,123
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2006
    Location:
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Hey Frank, the great groups you listed certainly represent the diversity of influences that we loosely refer to as fusion. I bet you are well aware that the composers in those outfits are coming from correspondingly different places that influence their writing style in terms of idiom, harmony, melody, form, rhythm, etc. So, if you are interested in studying a fusion of styles, I would argue it is wise to make sure you are knowledgeable with the source idioms from conventions of harmony, melody, counterpoint and beyond. For example, before you take apart some Tribal Tech charts and solos, it would be wise to have first studied the blues and bebop phrasing, and conventions of jazz chord progressions and substitutions. This is where a well-versed teacher could be very helpful to you. Not many people will have the drive and ability to learn this all independently! Go for it!

    :dude
     
  7. countandduke

    countandduke Member

    Messages:
    1,268
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    There are a couple Scott Henderson books out there and they are all good. Scott said in an interview that his style is actually similar to Donald Fagan from Steely Dan so analyzing some of those tunes might help too. Mel Bay has a book entitled "Getting into Fusion" and I found it nothing more than some scales and then chords derived from those scales. I think "fusion" encompasses a lot of different kinds of music so being well versed in blues and jazz would certainly not be a bad idea...

    Chris
     
  8. gennation

    gennation Member

    Messages:
    6,642
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2006
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Just get the John Mclaughlin DVD's, learn from the master.

    They are exactly what you are looking for, and will keep you learning for a long time.

    You can use the On Topic section of my lesson site too: http://lessons.mikedodge.com there's a bunch of Mclaughlin related stuff there too.
     
  9. Frank Prince

    Frank Prince Member

    Messages:
    3,546
    Joined:
    May 31, 2004
    Location:
    Omaha, NE
    Thanks for all the suggestions, guys.

    I have a lot of basic theory and have internalized the diatonic major modes, can improvise a bit over ii-V-Is, build chords up to 13 against the diatonic major modes, etc.

    I think where I am lacking is on the diminished and augmented scale side, modes and chords built from the harmonic and melodic minor scales, reharmonization, and all that.

    I have the Levine book, and I have started to shed on the material I am unfamiliar with. I may take a shot at internalizing a lot of of that material before I try anything else.


    I also have one of the Henderson books, so I might start looking at that and reading the scores along with the CDs once I'm up on all the Levine stuff.

    After that, if I haven't died of old age yet, then I might try McLaughlin's DVD's. :eek:
     
  10. Sid

    Sid Member

    Messages:
    3,432
    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Location:
    Jersey City
    I found this to be really helpful, you're a great teacher man....that counts for a lot in my book:D...lotsa guys have a lotta knowledge but teaching is an art!!!
     

Share This Page